Chemical Forums

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Sponsored links

Pages: 1 [2] 3   Go Down

Author Topic: Good Inorganic Chemistry Textbooks  (Read 67445 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

hmx9123

  • Retired Staff
  • Full Member
  • *
  • Mole Snacks: +59/-18
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 888
Re: Good Inorganic Chemistry Textbooks
« Reply #15 on: April 07, 2008, 08:52:17 PM »

One excellent book is the Organometallic Chemistry of the Transition Metals by Robert Crabtree.  It is geared more toward organometallic chemistry, as you may expect, but it is written on a very understandable level and is quite good at explaining simple concepts like electron counting.

If the Inorganic Chemistry book by Shriver and Atkins is the same one but a newer edition of the Shirver, Atkins and Langford book, I don't have very high hopes for it.  The original was a giant turd.

The Advanced Inorganic Chemistry by Cotton and the Chemistry of the Elements by Greenwood and Earnshaw are both excellent reference texts, but aren't so hot for reading through.

I never bought the Basic Inorganic Chemistry by Cotton, as I wasn't enthralled by it.  Not to say that he doesn't have a lot of good things to say, as his Advanced Inorganic book is excellent, but his Basic book wasn't to my tastes.  I am unfamiliar with the other books.

I have Chemical Structure and Bonding by DeKock and Gray, but it is more geared toward molecular orbital theory.
Logged

Doom91

  • Regular Member
  • ***
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-3
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 54
Re: Good Inorganic Chemistry Textbooks
« Reply #16 on: February 15, 2009, 06:45:20 PM »

Does anyone has any recommendations for inorganic chem textbooks
Logged

sm2345

  • Regular Member
  • ***
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-2
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 15
Re: Good Inorganic Chemistry Textbooks
« Reply #17 on: February 26, 2009, 04:17:48 PM »

I use the book "Concise Inorganic Chemistry" by JD Lee and I think it's good.
Logged

c0d3

  • Regular Member
  • ***
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 25
Re: Good Inorganic Chemistry Textbooks
« Reply #18 on: May 10, 2009, 10:24:25 PM »

Inorganic Chemistry by Shriver, Atkins for me. I think it covers quite detail
Logged

brian

  • New Member
  • **
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-1
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3
Re: Good Inorganic Chemistry Textbooks
« Reply #19 on: May 11, 2009, 03:59:58 AM »

the shriver atkins books is simply terrible it explains things soo poorly ive worked with much better texts before
Logged

Rabn

  • Chemist
  • Full Member
  • *
  • Mole Snacks: +28/-13
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 284
Re: Good Inorganic Chemistry Textbooks
« Reply #20 on: May 11, 2009, 05:20:42 AM »

I've found that the Zumdahl text is pretty good. anyone else use it?
Logged

McCoy

  • Regular Member
  • ***
  • Mole Snacks: +4/-2
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 87
Re: Good Inorganic Chemistry Textbooks
« Reply #21 on: June 18, 2009, 08:57:48 AM »

Besides the books suggested, try Inorganic Chemistry
by Prof Catherine Housecroft (Author), Alan G. Sharpe (Author) 3rd edn.
It's quite good too.
Logged

McCoy

  • Regular Member
  • ***
  • Mole Snacks: +4/-2
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 87
Re: Good Inorganic Chemistry Textbooks
« Reply #22 on: June 18, 2009, 09:09:50 AM »


Yes I  agree on shriver...atkin inorganic not being thorough in explaining things. for example (just one e.g) it has topic on electronic transtion, yet says nothing! Chapter on transtion metal chemistry too is just annoying. I think Atkin Pchem is Atkin's best(well better).
[/quote]
Logged

408

  • Chemist
  • Full Member
  • *
  • Mole Snacks: +102/-30
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 792
Re: Good Inorganic Chemistry Textbooks
« Reply #23 on: June 18, 2009, 07:20:45 PM »

Housecroft and Sharpe is cool.

But no inorganic is complete without supplementation by  Cotton and Wilkinson, Advanced Inorganic Chemistry.
Logged

CrazyAssasin

  • Regular Member
  • ***
  • Mole Snacks: +4/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 47
Re: Good Inorganic Chemistry Textbooks
« Reply #24 on: January 02, 2013, 08:48:50 AM »

Could anyone suggest good inorganic chemistry textbook which involves coordination complex chemistry? It should involve like only one chapter not the whole book. I read some in Atkins chemical principles but it wasn't enough. I want a bit broader information.
Logged

orgo814

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Mole Snacks: +10/-6
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 406
Re: Good Inorganic Chemistry Textbooks
« Reply #25 on: March 27, 2013, 04:21:44 PM »

"Principles of Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry" by Gary Wulfsperg is an excellent introduction to inorganic chemistry
Logged

Big-Daddy

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Mole Snacks: +28/-94
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1177
Re: Good Inorganic Chemistry Textbooks
« Reply #26 on: August 12, 2013, 12:59:20 AM »

Any texts that cover the whole first 2 years of a typical undergraduate course without missing anything out? I don't think Atkins quite cuts it.
Logged

GabrielMoon18

  • Very New Member
  • *
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2
Re: Good Inorganic Chemistry Textbooks
« Reply #27 on: September 11, 2013, 05:00:29 AM »

norganic Chemistry, Second Edition [James House] is also a nice one
Logged

unsu

  • Regular Member
  • ***
  • Mole Snacks: +8/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 65
Re: Good Inorganic Chemistry Textbooks
« Reply #28 on: January 08, 2015, 08:28:56 PM »

Unfortunately, many modern inorganic chemistry textbooks do not describe chemistry of the elements very well, they are very brief and not well-structured, and bloated with too much of unnecessary information at the same time. They describe so many exotic molecules, bonds, quantum-mechanical features, etc. Many students and even instructors nowadays are not familiar with many basic reactions, typical compounds and their properties.

Housecroft&Sharpe = just a very good encyclopedia, chemistry of the elements and their compounds is just briefly mentioned in the paragraphs, but there are so many nicely coloured figures and pictures of rare compounds extracted from the research papers. There are some typos there. But I like it anyway.
Shriver&Atkins also lacks the chemistry of compounds, focusing too much on bonding and quantum chemistry. The font is too small.

James House = too brief

Meissler Tarr = good text but the main focus is on the complex compounds

Many inorganic chemistry textbooks do not cover the binary phase diagrams and non-stoichiometric compounds and phases. Anthony West "Solid state chemistry and its applications" is a good addition to your library collection, you will like it.

In my opinion, Cotton-Wilkinson and Greenwoods "Chemistry of the elements" build the necessary basis of inorganic chemistry despite being "old".
« Last Edit: January 08, 2015, 09:21:17 PM by unsu »
Logged

darkhunter

  • Very New Member
  • *
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1
Re: Good Inorganic Chemistry Textbooks
« Reply #29 on: November 17, 2015, 07:03:21 AM »

Please tell me about the book vacuum? I want to talk to those who know the vacuum.
Logged
Pages: 1 [2] 3   Go Up
 

Mitch Andre Garcia's Chemical Forums 2003-Present.

Page created in 0.343 seconds with 23 queries.