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Author Topic: Anyone know how to plot Michaelis Menton curves in Excel?  (Read 21336 times)

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Jazzified

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Anyone know how to plot Michaelis Menton curves in Excel?
« on: May 02, 2008, 01:27:23 PM »

I'd like to make Michaelis Menton curves using Microsoft Excel.  Is there a way to do this?
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Yggdrasil

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Re: Anyone know how to plot Michaelis Menton curves in Excel?
« Reply #1 on: May 02, 2008, 06:23:43 PM »

Do you want to plot a theoretical curve or do you want to fit some data to a curve?  Excel can do the former, but I don't think it can do the latter easily.
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JGK

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Re: Anyone know how to plot Michaelis Menton curves in Excel?
« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2008, 03:36:31 AM »

It should be No different to plotting a standard X, Y regression plot all you have to do is to make sure you the correct X and Y data ranges and format the graph approprietly to get your information.
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Einherjar_PT

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Re: Anyone know how to plot Michaelis Menton curves in Excel?
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2008, 05:24:45 AM »

I was trying to do the same very recently. Excel, (at least as far as I know, and without addons) doesn't perform Hyperbolic Regression. Use the program Hyper32, besides doing hyperbolic regression, it was designed to aid in Enzyme Kinetics, and it also plots the Lineweaver, Eadie and Hanes lines, for the given initial speeds and substrate concentrations.
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Gerard

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Re: Anyone know how to plot Michaelis Menton curves in Excel?
« Reply #4 on: May 24, 2008, 08:01:42 AM »

I'd like to make Michaelis Menton curves using Microsoft Excel.  Is there a way to do this?
- i think it is quite complicated when you use the michealis-menten plot...i mean not all enzymatic and bacterial activity follow the plot curve..particularly when multiple substrate inhibition is involved...
when i was still an assistant reseracher in the microbial technology i was culturing bacillus subtilis what i do is that i use the Lineweaver-Burk equation it is more linear than the hyperbolic plot of the M-M equation...thus one can directly predict the next activity of the enzymes...
however if you really want to plot the M-M equation you can plot on the Y axis the reaction rate and in the x-axis the substrate concentration..you can determine Km at Vm=0.5Vm....
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Einherjar_PT

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Re: Anyone know how to plot Michaelis Menton curves in Excel?
« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2008, 09:53:41 AM »

Different linearization methods have different advantages and disadvantages.
Lineweaver-Burk is very susceptible to error, specially in the low values of substrate concentration. The Hanes is in my opinion one of the most accurate. But that depends on each case, choose wisely...
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Gerard

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Re: Anyone know how to plot Michaelis Menton curves in Excel?
« Reply #6 on: May 25, 2008, 04:29:59 AM »

Different linearization methods have different advantages and disadvantages.
Lineweaver-Burk is very susceptible to error, specially in the low values of substrate concentration. The Hanes is in my opinion one of the most accurate. But that depends on each case, choose wisely...
-the hanes method....yes i tried that....i can recall my professor asked me to derive that,my first paper was a real mess....
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