Chemical Forums

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Sponsored links

Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: How to determine the strongest base?  (Read 6437 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

oceanmd

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Mole Snacks: +2/-19
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 114
How to determine the strongest base?
« on: May 27, 2008, 03:24:11 PM »

how can I determine the strongest base according to the Bronsted-Lowry theory? NO3, F, I, Cl

My reasoning: HNO3 is a strong acid (by using the table of strong acids), so NO3 is its weak conjugate base; the same is true about HCl and HI; HF is a weak acid, so F is its strong conjugate base. The answer is F
My question: how should I be able to determine it without using the table of strong and weak acids. Is there a way to determine it by using the Periodic table, or should I just memorize the strong and weak acids from the table?
Thank you very much
Logged

enahs

  • 16-92-15-68 32-7-53-92-16
  • Retired Staff
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Mole Snacks: +205/-44
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 2180
Re: How to determine the strongest base?
« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2008, 03:38:37 PM »

http://www.chemicalforums.com/index.php?topic=23756.0

But I would also just memorize the name and formula for the common 5 or 6 strong acids and the same or so strong bases listed in your book. I am against just memorization, as this is science, see the other thread I linked to for science. But you are going to need this information about those very common strong acids and bases so much so much, it will just make your life easier to take a few minutes and memorize them.
Logged

oceanmd

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Mole Snacks: +2/-19
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 114
Ionization equilibrium lies to the right
« Reply #2 on: May 27, 2008, 06:13:46 PM »

What does it mean
HX + H2O = H3O + X
If a strong acid reacts with a strong base H2O ionization equilibrium lies almost completely to the right.
The right of what? The above equation? H3O is a weak acid and X is a weak base, why is equilibrium to the right?
Is it true to say that equilibrium lies on the side of the weak acid?

Thank you
Logged

Borek

  • Mr. pH
  • Administrator
  • Deity Member
  • *
  • Mole Snacks: +1380/-370
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 21169
  • I am known to be occasionally wrong.
    • Chembuddy
Re: How to determine the strongest base?
« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2008, 08:47:14 PM »

Logged
ChemBuddy chemical calculators - stoichiometry, pH, concentration, buffer preparation, titrations.info, pH-meter.info
Pages: [1]   Go Up
 

Mitch Andre Garcia's Chemical Forums 2003-Present.

Page created in 0.053 seconds with 23 queries.