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Author Topic: A physical chemistry problem  (Read 5125 times)

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vhpk

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A physical chemistry problem
« on: June 16, 2009, 10:51:16 PM »

I have difficulty solving an exercise in Physical Chemistry of Atkins.
A diving bell has an air space of 3.0 m3 when on the deck of a boat. What is the volume of the air space when the bell has been lowered to a depth of 50 m? Take the mean density of sea water to be 1.025 gcm- 3 and assume that the temperature is the same as on the surface.
The answer is 0.5m3, however, I don't know how to solve the problem as I don't know what the relationship between the density and the volume when temperature is constant apart from : V =mD, but it can't be praticed in this case.
Thank you for reading and helping me solve this :)
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Borek

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Re: A physical chemistry problem
« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2009, 11:43:03 PM »

Use density of water to calculate pressure.
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vhpk

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Re: A physical chemistry problem
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2009, 11:58:27 PM »

Okay,
P =Dgh = 1.025x10-6x9.8x50 =5.0225x10-4, right ?
Then use:
P1V1 = P2V2
With P1 = 1.0atm, V1=3.0m3, P2=5.0225x10-4 and calculate V2.
Is that right ???
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Re: A physical chemistry problem
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2009, 01:07:09 AM »

Watch your units.
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