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Author Topic: "How many electrons could occupy orbitals with the following quantum numbers?"  (Read 13238 times)

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s3a

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Question:
"How many electrons could occupy orbitals with the following quantum numbers?
a) n = 2, l = 0   b) n = 3, l =1, ml = 0   c) n = 4, l = 2   d) n = 1, l = 0, ml = 0"

I understand that each orbital can accommodate 2 electrons (do "orbitals" mean ml values?). I also understand that n = 1. n = 2, n = x is the coefficient 1, 2, and x respectively in front of the specific orbital. I know that the specific orbital is determined as follows: l = 0 ---> s, l = 1 ---> p, l = 2 ---> d, l = 3 ---> f. However, I do not know how to solve this problem. Could someone please explain it to me in a super simplistic way first by mentioning no theory but just steps and then incorporating the theory to it if possible?

Any help would be GREATLY appreciated!
Thanks in advance!
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renge ishyo

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Each orbital can only hold two electrons maximum. However, some of your answer choices contain more than 1 orbital in them...

For instance, if I was to ask you how many electrons could occupy p orbitals for n=2, l=1, ml = 0 the answer would be only be two electrons because ml=0 corresponds to only one of the three possible p orbitals (the three p orbitals correspond to values of ml = +1 or ml=0 or ml=-1).

However, if I instead ask how many electrons could occupy p orbitals for n=2, l=1, the answer would be six electrons because any of the three p orbitals could be used to contain electrons because the value of ml is not specified.

Not sure if that is what you wanted, but hopefully it helps you answer the question ;)
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