Chemical Forums

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Sponsored links

Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) Production Hazards to Palnt Assets?  (Read 1977 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

pwl

  • Very New Member
  • *
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2

During the production processes of Methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI - all three isomers) - what are the inherent hazards one might need to consider to the detriment of the production plant's assets (I am not concerned about personnel safety matters - I understand the non benign nature of MDI)?

In other words what are the main corrosive / other effects due to the WHOLE production process on metallurgical / other assets (structure / tanks / piping etc)?

Are special alloys required during new build plant construction?

Are special Hazards involved - likelihood of explosion / corrosive leakages etc?

What should a Techical Integrity Assurance Manager look out for in particular during the construction of a new MDI plant?

Thank you for your consideration.
Logged

Stepan

  • Chemist
  • Full Member
  • *
  • Mole Snacks: +39/-4
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 358
  • Air Chemistry Man
    • Supplier of air sampling equipment and services
Re: Methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) Production Hazards to Palnt Assets?
« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2010, 06:53:39 AM »

MDI easily polymerizes if in contact with moisture. Obviously this is an exothermic reaction. Also will react with everything which has -OH or =NH, -NH2 or active -H. And quite toxic, also causes allergic sensitization.

OC pro

  • Chemist
  • Full Member
  • *
  • Mole Snacks: +35/-14
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 396
Re: Methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) Production Hazards to Palnt Assets?
« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2010, 08:18:12 AM »

Moreover, phosgene is used to produce MDI. This is the most potent danger in the whole process.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
 

Mitch Andre Garcia's Chemical Forums 2003-Present.

Page created in 0.064 seconds with 23 queries.