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Author Topic: Strange iron carbide  (Read 3367 times)

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bberti

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Strange iron carbide
« on: January 08, 2011, 12:34:38 AM »

Last night I ran into a strange chemical formula.
Fe26C6.
It was on a narrative book of my mother and I thought this was complete bulls&$#. As far as I know the only iron carbide is cementite with formula Fe3C.
Am I wrong?
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sjb

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Re: Strange iron carbide
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2011, 01:06:46 AM »

Last night I ran into a strange chemical formula.
Fe26C6.
It was on a narrative book of my mother and I thought this was complete bulls&$#. As far as I know the only iron carbide is cementite with formula Fe3C.
Am I wrong?

You may be able to get higher complexes of iron and carbon, just like you have buckyballs and similar for pure carbon. Having said that, I am not actually aware of any, and it could mean simply FeC, with the atomic numbers used for iron and carbon? What was the actual formatting of the text?

I can't find a full phase diagram for iron-carbon mixtures at the moment
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longdeer

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Re: Strange iron carbide
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2011, 11:40:20 AM »

In the early 1900's some books identified chemical bonds by using the Atomic number as an addition to the structure. If you notice on the Periodic Table 6 is the At.No. for Carbon and 26 is the At.No. for Iron.
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Enthalpy

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Re: Strange iron carbide
« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2011, 04:44:52 PM »

Many (dozens) iron carbides are known, with high numbers in their formula. Fe26C6 doesn't look uncommon, though I didn't memorize exact numbers.

Steel is the best known and most complex alloy. At least 10 names of different iron-carbide crystals are used commonly.

But sure, 26 and 6 suggest atomic numbers, well done.
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