Chemical Forums

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Sponsored links

Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Turnover number of Carbonic Anhydrase  (Read 4210 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Rags241

  • Very New Member
  • *
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2
Turnover number of Carbonic Anhydrase
« on: March 04, 2011, 09:45:15 PM »

So i seem to be very stuck with a question, and I was hoping some of you could give me a helping hand -- point me in the right direction :)

The question is:
Carbonic anhydrase of erythrocytes (Mr 30,000) has one of the highest turnover numbers we know of. It catalyses the reversible hydration of CO2.
If 10 ug of pure carbonic anhydrase catalyses the hydration of 0.30g of CO2 in 1 min at 37 degrees celcius at Vmax, what is the turnover number of carbonic anhydrase (in units of min-1)?

Now I know Vmax=kcat x [E] but I couldn't really get further from there as I had problems calculating [E] -- so any help would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks
Logged

Yggdrasil

  • Retired Staff
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Mole Snacks: +455/-20
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 3052
  • Physical Biochemist
Re: Turnover number of Carbonic Anhydrase
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2011, 04:40:34 AM »

Do you know how to calculate the number of moles of carbonic anhydrase that correspond to 10μg?  Can you calculate the number of moles that corresponds to 0.30g of carbon dioxide?
Logged

Rags241

  • Very New Member
  • *
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2
Re: Turnover number of Carbonic Anhydrase
« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2011, 09:23:09 AM »

Yeah that's just a case of n=m/M isn't it? But how do I get from moles to concentration when I don't have a volume -- that's where I got stuck.
Logged

Yggdrasil

  • Retired Staff
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Mole Snacks: +455/-20
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 3052
  • Physical Biochemist
Re: Turnover number of Carbonic Anhydrase
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2011, 08:44:45 AM »

Just assume your volume is x.  It should cancel out in the end.  (If you prefer using real numbers instead of variables, just assume 1mL volume)
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
 

Mitch Andre Garcia's Chemical Forums 2003-Present.

Page created in 0.06 seconds with 23 queries.