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Author Topic: Why acetone evaporates faster then H20  (Read 8893 times)

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Kensu

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Why acetone evaporates faster then H20
« on: December 05, 2005, 05:11:51 PM »

This is a questionthe teacher told us to research on. Ok first off I know that acetone is a volatile liquid and it evaporates easily. I need like more into depth explaination like what makes it evaporate faster and how and why.

Info:

Boiling point at 56.3 Degree C
Evaporate rate o f7.7 at 20 degree C
Density of .819 or 79g/cm^3

My guess is that is because of it's boiling point is lower then water which makes it evaporate faster. And one more question does the density have anything to do with it evaporating?
Thanks for your time I'll look this up tomorrow in school.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2005, 05:17:30 PM by Kensu »
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Mitch

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Re:Why acetone evaporates faster then H20
« Reply #1 on: December 05, 2005, 06:31:11 PM »

The key answer will involve water's hydrogen bonds.
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Kensu

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Re:Why acetone evaporates faster then H20
« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2005, 07:11:38 PM »

hmm ic I shall look into this, thanks for the hint. I will deliberate this with my teacher in the morning.  

But what if I were to relate this topic to a Kinetic Engergy form? Could I say that acetone would evaporate faster because it is volatile, this is because it's molecules doesn't put forth strong attractive forces on one another(reword book definition).

I would like to understand more of "molecules doesn't put forth strong attractive forces on one another".

Would they be talking about the high KE?
« Last Edit: December 05, 2005, 07:12:23 PM by Kensu »
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Mitch

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Re:Why acetone evaporates faster then H20
« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2005, 07:35:29 PM »

"molecules doesn't put forth strong attractive forces on one another" Thats one way of saying "acetone doesn't hydrogen bond". :P
« Last Edit: December 05, 2005, 07:35:48 PM by Mitch »
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Kensu

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Re:Why acetone evaporates faster then H20
« Reply #4 on: December 06, 2005, 05:38:04 AM »

Ah heh I had this explained from a  friend from WoW and found out that H20 is polar and has hydrogen bonding which keep the molecules closer. And now, acetone doesn't have hydrogen bond. =D ah thanks mitch. Great forum I found lol.
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Kensu

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Re:Why acetone evaporates faster then H20
« Reply #5 on: December 06, 2005, 03:59:46 PM »

Ah went to school today and found out that the answer she wanted was that it's because acetone has a less attracte force... wow  lol we went maybe too far in depth lol. ;D
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