Chemical Forums

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Sponsored links

Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Why is hexane reformed and isomerised?  (Read 5717 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

mattg2006

  • Guest
Why is hexane reformed and isomerised?
« on: December 28, 2005, 03:50:11 AM »

Why do oil companies reform and isomerise hexane and other hydrocarbons?

Thanks
Logged

Will

  • Organic Dude
  • Chemist
  • Full Member
  • *
  • Mole Snacks: +58/-2
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 400
Re:Why is hexane reformed and isomerised?
« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2005, 04:21:08 AM »

Hexane can be reformed to benzene (at 500oC, 40atm using Al2O3 catalyst). Benzene is a relatively valuable hydrocarbon, so it is economical to do this reaction, even though benzene can be extracted from coal (destructive distillation to coal tar and fractional distillation) and made by the polymerisation of ethyne.

The reason oil compainies do reforming, alkylation, cracking and platforming (using platinum as catalyst, often allowing lower pressures to be used) is because they produce hydrocarbons with a higher value/quality.

Hope this answers your question :)!
Logged

mattg2006

  • Guest
Re:Why is hexane reformed and isomerised?
« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2005, 04:25:36 AM »

Yes, that does answer my question. I don't think I covered it in class though, which is why I didnt know how to answer it.

Thankyou very much.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
 

Mitch Andre Garcia's Chemical Forums 2003-Present.

Page created in 0.124 seconds with 23 queries.