Chemical Forums

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Sponsored links

Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Electrochemical Series  (Read 598 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Nitin_Naudiyal

  • Regular Member
  • ***
  • Mole Snacks: +1/-13
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 92
Electrochemical Series
« on: December 05, 2012, 11:38:42 PM »

E0Cu2+|Cu = 0.24 V
E0Ni2+|Ni = -0.257 V

In my college Textbook its written that Ni Spatula will displace Cu from CuSO4
How does one determine that Ni displaces Cu from its solution.
Is it that Ni has a lower ( Negative) reduction potential than Cu hence it displaces it.
Or is it that a compound with lower Reduction potential displaces the other with higher Potential?
Logged

Borek

  • Mr. pH
  • Administrator
  • Deity Member
  • *
  • Mole Snacks: +1368/-369
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 20971
  • I am known to be occasionally wrong.
    • Chembuddy
Re: Electrochemical Series
« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2012, 12:20:42 AM »

Is it that Ni has a lower ( Negative) reduction potential than Cu hence it displaces it.
Or is it that a compound with lower Reduction potential displaces the other with higher Potential?

Somehow I fail to see the difference.

If you ask whether it matters if the potential is negative - it doesn't. What matters is that one potential is lower than the other.
Logged
ChemBuddy chemical calculators - stoichiometry, pH, concentration, buffer preparation, titrations.info, pH-meter.info

Nitin_Naudiyal

  • Regular Member
  • ***
  • Mole Snacks: +1/-13
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 92
Re: Electrochemical Series
« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2012, 12:28:02 AM »

Quote
Somehow I fail to see the difference.

If you ask whether it matters if the potential is negative - it doesn't. What matters is that one potential is lower than the other.

So, if one potential is lower than the other, the element with the lower potential will displace the compound with the higher potential.
Is is correct?
Logged

Borek

  • Mr. pH
  • Administrator
  • Deity Member
  • *
  • Mole Snacks: +1368/-369
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 20971
  • I am known to be occasionally wrong.
    • Chembuddy
Re: Electrochemical Series
« Reply #3 on: December 06, 2012, 02:13:22 AM »

Generally speaking - yes.

Note that in water you always have some H+, so elements with negative potentials can displace it producing H2. It is also possible that given element is passivated with oxides, which make it nonreactive, even if the potential suggests otherwise.
Logged
ChemBuddy chemical calculators - stoichiometry, pH, concentration, buffer preparation, titrations.info, pH-meter.info

Nitin_Naudiyal

  • Regular Member
  • ***
  • Mole Snacks: +1/-13
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 92
Re: Electrochemical Series
« Reply #4 on: December 06, 2012, 11:22:16 PM »

E0Ag = 0.8V, E0Cl2 = 1.36V.
So, is Oxidation of Ag is possible by Cl2?

As the Standard Potential of Cl2 is greater than that of Ag, Cl2 can oxidize Ag.
i.e. Ag can reduce Cl2
Is it correct?
Logged

Borek

  • Mr. pH
  • Administrator
  • Deity Member
  • *
  • Mole Snacks: +1368/-369
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 20971
  • I am known to be occasionally wrong.
    • Chembuddy
Re: Electrochemical Series
« Reply #5 on: December 06, 2012, 11:35:01 PM »

Yes.
Logged
ChemBuddy chemical calculators - stoichiometry, pH, concentration, buffer preparation, titrations.info, pH-meter.info

Nitin_Naudiyal

  • Regular Member
  • ***
  • Mole Snacks: +1/-13
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 92
Re: Electrochemical Series
« Reply #6 on: December 06, 2012, 11:45:35 PM »

Thank You
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
 

Mitch Andre Garcia's Chemical Forums 2003-Present.

Page created in 0.054 seconds with 23 queries.