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Author Topic: How does copper form a Cu 2+ ion? (Electron Configuration)  (Read 101781 times)

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khaoz

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How does copper form a Cu 2+ ion? (Electron Configuration)
« on: February 13, 2006, 02:42:14 PM »

Normally, the electron configuration for copper would be [Ar] 4s1 3d10. What would be the configuartion for a Cu2+ stable ion be?
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madscientist

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Re:How does copper form a Cu 2+ ion? (Electron Configuration)
« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2006, 10:08:50 AM »

Cu = [Ar]3d104s1 this configuration does not follow the n+l rule. in other words if you use box notation to map out the electron configuration of Cu2+ you dont fill the 4s orbital first.

so,if:Cu=[Ar]3d104s1=29=atomic number=nu-mber of electrons

Then, Cu2+ indicates that 2 electrons have been given up by the copper atom and the electron configuration is therefore:

Cu2+= [Ar]3d9 =27= atomic number = number of electrons
« Last Edit: February 18, 2006, 10:11:28 AM by madscientist »
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DeP

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Re: How does copper form a Cu 2+ ion? (Electron Configuration)
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2011, 12:17:46 AM »

For Cu2+ you have indeed 27 electrons,
but first you have to fill in the 4s orbital and than the 3d orbital
so then you have  for Cu2+ a [Ar]3d74s2 electron configuration

The reason that they for Cu0 fill in first the 3d orbital instead of the 4s orbital, is because a full 3d orbital is more stable than an incompletely filled 3d orbital
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vmelkon

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Re: How does copper form a Cu 2+ ion? (Electron Configuration)
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2011, 07:50:18 AM »

For Cu2+ you have indeed 27 electrons,
but first you have to fill in the 4s orbital and than the 3d orbital
so then you have  for Cu2+ a [Ar]3d74s2 electron configuration

The reason that they for Cu0 fill in first the 3d orbital instead of the 4s orbital, is because a full 3d orbital is more stable than an incompletely filled 3d orbital

An electron jumps from the 3d to the 4s?
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