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Author Topic: Updated undergraduate biochemistry textbook  (Read 7174 times)

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aram2189

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Updated undergraduate biochemistry textbook
« on: April 04, 2015, 08:39:21 PM »

I am currently searching for a textbook for an undergraduate biochemistry course. Currently at my institution biochemistry is divided into three courses and the textbook that was required in the first course is now obsolete in the second course (metabolic pathways). The professor consistently says the chemical mechanisms shown in the textbook are no longer accepted or incorrect. The textbook is Biochemistry by Berg seventh edition. Can someone please offer alternatives that are more up to date with the chemical mechanisms.
« Last Edit: June 11, 2017, 12:35:59 AM by Arkcon »
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Arkcon

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Re: Updated undergraduate biochemistry textbook
« Reply #1 on: April 07, 2015, 10:26:59 AM »

I suppose the simplest answer is the most recent version of that author's textbook.  To give a more involved answer, I'd like a better explanation of the premise:

Quote
The professor consistently says the chemical mechanisms shown in the textbook are no longer accepted or incorrect

Umm ... huh?  The standard biochemical reactions, such as glycolosis, the Kreb's cycle, and the like?  Those have been well defined and verified for decades.  I'm pretty sure my Zubay textbook, back in 1994, explicitly said the pathways were done, and modern work is focused more on determining triggers for various side reactions, as a way of better understanding metabolism.

Then again, 18th century scientists in Britain lamented that, with Newton's work, everything was known, and nothing was left to learn.  They were wrong, so maybe there needs to be a real paradigm shift in our knowledge of biochemistry.  I'd still like a specific example, 'tho.

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Babcock_Hall

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Re: Updated undergraduate biochemistry textbook
« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2015, 01:33:35 PM »

Mechanisms may refer to the steps catalyzed by a single enzyme, as opposed to the intermediates in a pathway.  However, I would like to know more about what the professor means also.  Didn't he or she specify a textbook?  BTW, there is no reason to think that the mechanisms in an undergraduate text would always exactly match those that one might find in a graduate enzymology textbook.
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aram2189

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Re: Updated undergraduate biochemistry textbook
« Reply #3 on: April 13, 2015, 09:12:50 AM »

I would like to first apologize for the late reply. As Babcock_Hall said earlier by mechanisms I am referring to:

...steps catalyzed by a single enzyme, as opposed to the intermediates in a pathway.


or if you will the arrow pushing mechanism of said metabolic reactions. Also to clarify the professor did not recommend the textbook. As I said earlier Biochemistry is divided into three courses at my school, Biochemical Structure and Function, Biochemical Energetics and Metabolism, and Biosynthesis of Macromolecules. The textbook served me well in the first and last course stated above however for the current course I am taking, Biochemical Energetics and Metabolism, the textbook is hardly used. Comparing my notes from lecture to the textbook I can say that some of the mechanisms are identical, some are similar with omission of the actual enzyme taking place in the reaction (ie rather than a Histidine residue donating a proton to oxaloacetate, oxaloacetate becomes protonated from a free proton) and others are quite different. Babcock_Hall, you mentioned a graduate enzymology textbook, what would you recommend? I know that I can just as easily google it and find a list of textbooks, but is there any in particular that you prefer?
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Babcock_Hall

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Re: Updated undergraduate biochemistry textbook
« Reply #4 on: April 13, 2015, 09:34:40 AM »

Enzymatic Reaction Mechanisms by Frey and Hegeman (2007).  Unfortunately, the market is so small that new books only come out very infrequently.  The previous book that was totally focused on mechanisms was from about 1979 by Christopher Walsh.  As a general biochemistry textbook, Nelson and Cox or Voet and Voet are both good choices IMO.
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