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Author Topic: New to spectroscopy. Have an interest, time and the machine.  (Read 483 times)

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Trismus

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New to spectroscopy. Have an interest, time and the machine.
« on: October 03, 2016, 04:56:22 AM »

Hi

I recently got a Picospin80. Now im trying to learn how to operate it, or at least the basics.
I've come to realize that its much more to this then I first thought.

I run some sample in the machine, and get a spectrum. But there is so many different parameters and settings to do.
Iv understood that its one pulse scan i should do. How can one know what optimal frequenze is for different substances?

This is the Picospin interface




This is what i get from alcohol and the substance dissolved.



Here is the same alcohol without added substance



I have edited this in Mestrenova. Just the basic stuff, baseline correction and putting in multiplet.

This is about as far as I have come.
I'm trying to figure out what the sample is, and the purity of product.

All kind of help is appreciated.


« Last Edit: October 03, 2016, 05:09:02 AM by Trismus »
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Irlanur

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Re: New to spectroscopy. Have an interest, time and the machine.
« Reply #1 on: October 18, 2016, 11:02:12 PM »

Quote
How can one know what optimal frequenze is for different substances?

Well as long as your taking proton spectra, they should be in the range of a few ppm , so you probably won't have to adjust the frequency too much. The exact frequency also depends on your magnet, which is probably more or less stable.

Quote
I'm trying to figure out what the sample is, and the purity of product.

since your resolution is around 4ppm and the typical chemical shift range of protons is around 10ppm i doubt that this is possible with this spectrometer only. I guess you could use it to follow chemical reactions, though.
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