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Author Topic: Vanadium/HNO3  (Read 315 times)

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shiffdaddy

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Vanadium/HNO3
« on: January 09, 2017, 05:36:43 PM »

I'm really into safely making/experimenting with my excess metals from my periodic table of the elements collection. I decided I had enough Vanadium so I wanted to test against the acids (HCl, H2SO4, HNO3) so I set up 3 tests tubes and the only one that reacted with with nitric acid.

The solution was a blue color, into a darker blue with sludge on the top.  Once the powder was completely dry I thought maybe I have vanadium nitrate. The powder was insoluble in water and made sort of an orange stain wherever it touches

any thoughts?

Ben
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cutelab

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Re: Vanadium/HNO3
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2017, 05:41:35 AM »

Hey Ben, what is the source of vanadium here?
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Enthalpy

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Re: Vanadium/HNO3
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2017, 12:18:20 PM »

My two cents, just to seed the thread:
  • Your observations match Wiki's claims
  • If nitric acid corrodes but others don't, then nitric probably acts as an oxidizer there rather than a plain acid
  • In such a case, the main product wouldn't be a nitrate
  • Its standard electrode potentials don't qualify vanadium as a noble metal. It's said to resist corrosion thanks to its oxide layer. Though, such metals with a good oxide layer tend to withstand nitric acid better than hydrochloric, so the situation is somewhat unexpected.
Wish you get better answers.
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Corribus

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Re: Vanadium/HNO3
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2017, 05:29:24 AM »

Vanadium complexes exhibit a variety of colors depending on the oxidation state of the V center. The oxides take on a number of colors, and V2O5 is notably orange.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vanadium%28V%29_oxide

In solution, hydrated vanadium complexes are also variably colored, and the +2 aqua complex is intensely blue.

Be aware, vanadium complexes and salts are mildly toxic, so I hope you are using gloves and other suitable protection. Which of course you should be doing whenever you play around with chemicals.
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