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Author Topic: Faster way to dissolve tin?  (Read 2889 times)

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Qaiphyx

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Faster way to dissolve tin?
« on: February 19, 2017, 08:40:48 AM »

Whats a faster way to dissolve tin with hydrochloric acid without using nitric acid?

The reaction with concentrated hydrochloric acid is quite slow, and I honestly havent been able to find anything on this topic.

Edit: Guess I should clarify that I mean is there a way to speed up the reaction with hydrochloric acid, other than adding nitric acid.
« Last Edit: February 19, 2017, 10:27:27 AM by Qaiphyx »
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Enthalpy

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Re: Faster way to dissolve tin?
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2017, 06:41:43 AM »

The standard means is to have the metal finely divided: as a powder, turnings...

Besides that, if you want just hydrochloric acid, you can only adjust the temperature and concentration.

Or would you accept an additive other than nitric acid?
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CobaltBlue

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Re: Faster way to dissolve tin?
« Reply #2 on: May 16, 2017, 02:07:27 PM »

I have an idea... I tried dissolving tin, and yes it is slow.  I also was trying to dissolve nickel, very slow also.  I didn't want to use nitric acid, as I don't have any, and at the moment I don't want to deal with that.

After much thinking, I thought of increasing the temperature.  I used a beaker on a hot plate set to around 1 or 2, but too much of either the water or HCL was boiling off fast.  So I tried using a boiling flask with a rubber stopper with a small hole.  Voila! I boiled the nickel button (a flattened sphere) for 3 days, (better than waiting potentially for several months!) till it was gone.  Not only that, little of the liquid boiled away.

I bought a boiling flask that had an extra long neck, which I think also helps keep the liquid in. 

Also, I tried boiling it at a setting of 2 which made the solution boil like mad, so I turned it down so there were few bubbles from the solution and mostly from the nickel. 

Yes, 3 days is a long time, but it is MUCH better than the alternative.
So try that with tin.  I am going to try it. 
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Enthalpy

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Re: Faster way to dissolve tin?
« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2017, 05:53:49 AM »

Would it be conceivable to let electricity speed up the reaction?

Use tin as the + electrode, something unreactive (graphite, stainless steel...) as the - electrode, inject a good intensity and be patient. Use big flat electrodes close to an other.

Make sure that potentially evolved Cl2 can escape where you don't breathe, and that evolved H2 can't accumulate. If Sn reacts, Cl2 shouldn't evolve.

Opinions welcome! Don't trust me on such topics.
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Qaiphyx

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Re: Faster way to dissolve tin?
« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2017, 03:37:37 PM »

I have an idea... I tried dissolving tin, and yes it is slow.  I also was trying to dissolve nickel, very slow also.  I didn't want to use nitric acid, as I don't have any, and at the moment I don't want to deal with that.

After much thinking, I thought of increasing the temperature.  I used a beaker on a hot plate set to around 1 or 2, but too much of either the water or HCL was boiling off fast.  So I tried using a boiling flask with a rubber stopper with a small hole.  Voila! I boiled the nickel button (a flattened sphere) for 3 days, (better than waiting potentially for several months!) till it was gone.  Not only that, little of the liquid boiled away.

I bought a boiling flask that had an extra long neck, which I think also helps keep the liquid in. 

Also, I tried boiling it at a setting of 2 which made the solution boil like mad, so I turned it down so there were few bubbles from the solution and mostly from the nickel. 

Yes, 3 days is a long time, but it is MUCH better than the alternative.
So try that with tin.  I am going to try it.

Revolutionary....
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