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Author Topic: Eyewash advice for home lab?  (Read 785 times)

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Consequentium

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Eyewash advice for home lab?
« on: June 01, 2017, 07:11:30 AM »

Hello, I'm coming close to finishing my B.S. in chemistry, and I've been happy to tinker and putter around with chemistry and electronics at home. Nothing fancy, but I find it helpful to "convince myself" of things as I learn about them, and I get a fair amount of benefit in terms of experience with azeotropic and other distillation techniques and old-school separations and identification techniques (modern spectroscopy means it's not something I was ever formally taught.) Electrochemistry is also something I do a fair amount of.

I do like to be very safe: I have a lot of strong acids, bases, and solvents. I store them carefully (separate acids and bases, I keep as little solvent as possible, synthesize ethers only when I need them etc.) I have an ABC fire extinguisher handy. Gloves, goggles, etc. Spray bottles with vinegar and baking soda solutions. I mention all of this in case it helps people understand what the possible issues are.

TL;DR: I'm pretty safe, but I don't have a great eyewash setup. I have two gallon bottles of distilled water in a dedicated area (near the first aid kit) in case I need a deluge or eye wash. I was thinking of buying one of those buffered eyewash kits, but I'm not sure it's an advantage. I work in a finished basement, but I'm pretty far from a sink. I was wondering if people had more advice on the subject.

I may seem a bit overcautious, but honestly, even a small disaster would probably complicate my life a great deal.
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Enthalpy

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Re: Eyewash advice for home lab?
« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2017, 11:43:55 PM »

In a basement, I'd worry about toxic gases.
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marquis

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Re: Eyewash advice for home lab?
« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2017, 07:58:20 AM »

There are bottled solutions, ( do a quick search of the Haws 7543 single bottle personal emergency eyewash station).  They are not as good as eyewash stations,  it a lot better than nothing. And relatively inexpensive.

Enthalpy has a point about chemical gases.  It is a cause of concern. 

Myself, I'm happy you are serious about safety.  Many people say they are, but don't train or prepare for safety issues.  Good luck.
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Consequentium

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Re: Eyewash advice for home lab?
« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2017, 02:39:26 PM »

In a basement, I'd worry about toxic gases.

I worry about that too, I work near one of those high basement windows and have a box fan pushing air out of it above the workspace. I also do electronics work in that area, so I also have small fume extractor for soldering. Not really as good as the box fan, though. 
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billnotgatez

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Re: Eyewash advice for home lab?
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2017, 08:27:35 PM »

@Consequentium
Have you thought about making your own fume hood?
http://www.instructables.com/howto/fume+hood/

@marquis
Is this an example of what you suggest for Personal eyewash station
Haws 7543 Single Bottle Personal Emergency Eyewash Station, (1) Sterile Saline Solution Bottle
https://www.eyewashdirect.com/haws-7543-single-bottle-personal-emergency-eyewash-c2610689

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