Chemical Forums

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Sponsored links

Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Solubility  (Read 313 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

cholmes7

  • Very New Member
  • *
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1
Solubility
« on: June 14, 2017, 04:04:45 PM »

I am desperate for some help concerning the solubility of potassium bisulphate and calcium chloride. I would really appreciate someone being able to explain why the solubilities of these two compounds are different to each other!!! ??? ??? ??? PS: my draft is due tomorrow and this is the last part of my assignment, I am so stuck! PPS: any help is good help, i will be so appreciative wowwo PPPS: i now understand it has to do with anions and cations???
« Last Edit: June 14, 2017, 05:50:28 PM by cholmes7 »
Logged

Borek

  • Mr. pH
  • Administrator
  • Deity Member
  • *
  • Mole Snacks: +1550/-389
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 23544
  • I am known to be occasionally wrong.
    • Chembuddy
Re: Solubility
« Reply #1 on: June 14, 2017, 09:54:41 PM »

I am desperate for some help concerning the solubility of potassium bisulphate and calcium chloride. I would really appreciate someone being able to explain why the solubilities of these two compounds are different to each other!!!

Why should they be identical?

Solubility is a function of interactions between all involved molecules. That means solvent, dissolved substance, plus - if the dissolved substance dissociates - cations and anions produced during dissociation. Plenty of things to consider.
Logged
ChemBuddy chemical calculators - stoichiometry, pH, concentration, buffer preparation, titrations.info, pH-meter.info

Ricin

  • Regular Member
  • ***
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 17
  • https://www.chronoleaks.com
    • Chronoleaks
Re: Solubility
« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2017, 01:34:46 AM »

Please be explicit, there are different types of solubility. I think i can help you thou

Arkcon

  • Global Moderator
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Mole Snacks: +477/-135
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 6763
Re: Solubility
« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2017, 01:22:50 PM »

I am desperate for some help concerning the solubility of potassium bisulphate and calcium chloride.
 

OK.  Their solubility are published, and you can use the values in a practical way.  I know that's not what you're looking for, but I wanted to show the sort of question that's easy to work with.

Quote
I would really appreciate someone being able to explain why the solubilities of these two compounds are different to each other

Well, basically because they're different substances.  Aluminum is light, lead is dense.  Mercury is a liquid at room temperature, iron is a solid, helium is a gas at all temperatures.  Why are you so specific, and so selective, with nothing explicit to go on?

Quote
!!! ??? ??? ??? PS: my draft is due tomorrow and this is the last part of my assignment, I am so stuck! PPS: any help is good help, i will be so appreciative wowwo PPPS:

Please follow our rules for posting, they're detailed here: Forum Rules{click}.

Quote
i now understand it has to do with anions and cations???

This angle of understanding this problem will probably not benefit you.

Here is the Wikipedia article regarding solubility:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solubility  Much of it does not have any bearing on the problem as you've stated it.  Its a lengthy article however, but it can't help you much, because you question is very advanced.  Lets see what it has: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solubility#Incongruent_dissolution

Look at this part, and also the next section: solubility prediction.

Quote
A number of methods have been applied to such predictions including quantitative structure–activity relationships (QSAR), quantitative structure–property relationships (QSPR) and data mining. These models provide efficient predictions of solubility and represent the current standard. The draw back such models is that they can lack physical insight. A method founded in physical theory, capable of achieving similar levels of accuracy at an sensible cost, would be a powerful tool scientifically and industrially.[27][28][29][30]

Can you follow that?  I can't -- not really.  All I know is that I can't know without using concepts that far advanced for me.

We get these sorts of questions all the time -- why is lead heavy, why is copper red and its salts blue, why is technetium radioactive when nothing else around it on the periodic table is, why is the neutron heavier than a proton and electron combined.  These are not bad questions, but there's no way we're going to get an answer for a high school student one posting at a time.
« Last Edit: June 18, 2017, 03:24:21 PM by Arkcon »
Logged
That all depends on how reasonable we're all willing to be.  I just want my friends back, except for Cartman, you can keep him.
Pages: [1]   Go Up
 

Mitch Andre Garcia's Chemical Forums 2003-Present.

Page created in 0.071 seconds with 23 queries.