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Author Topic: Citric Acid reaction equations  (Read 336 times)

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deezy

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Citric Acid reaction equations
« on: July 17, 2017, 12:52:36 PM »

Can someone help me identify the chemical reaction equations for the following, all are aqueous solutions, I think the metals will take place of 2 hydrogen's, but not sure what happens to the Sulfate the hydrogen gas.  Any help is much appreciated.

ZnSO4 (Zinc Sulfate monohydrate) +  C6H8O7  :rarrow: ?

MnSO4 (Manganese Sulfate monohydrate) +  C6H8O7  :rarrow: ?

CuSO4 (Copper sulfate pentahydrate) +  C6H8O7  :rarrow: ?

FeSO4 (Iron sulfate heptahydrate) +  C6H8O7 + Aqua Ammonia  :rarrow: ?
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chenbeier

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Re: Citric Acid reaction equations
« Reply #1 on: July 18, 2017, 01:33:52 AM »

Check the behavior of Citric acid and citrates as they working as  complex agents.
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Babcock_Hall

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Re: Citric Acid reaction equations
« Reply #2 on: July 18, 2017, 12:27:21 PM »

@OP, Why do you think that hydrogen gas will be evolved?
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deezy

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Re: Citric Acid reaction equations
« Reply #3 on: July 18, 2017, 06:19:52 PM »

I was mistaken when I wrote that. I was thinking of how H2 is typically produced when an acid and metal are reacted, but these are sulfates not metals.
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Arkcon

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Re: Citric Acid reaction equations
« Reply #4 on: July 18, 2017, 11:54:24 PM »

Good.  Now.  You have a molecular acid, soluble in water.  You have soluble sulfate salts, in water.  What do you get?

What do you get when you mix potassium chloride and sodium nitrate, as an example?

Note:  citrate forms complexes, as was mentioned before.  But why is that relevant to what you're doing?
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deezy

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Re: Citric Acid reaction equations
« Reply #5 on: July 19, 2017, 02:38:01 AM »

Would you get potassium nitrate and sodium chloride?  I understand Citric's form complexs with the metals as the metal sulfate dissociates. And I think the sulfates act as a weak base and grab a hydrogen from a water molecule but not 100'percent sure.

This is revelant in forming complexed fertilizer solutions. I am asking so I can understand the correct balanced equation of theses reactions.
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Arkcon

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Re: Citric Acid reaction equations
« Reply #6 on: July 19, 2017, 03:44:16 AM »

Would you get potassium nitrate and sodium chloride?

No you would not.  Try it and see.  If you tried it, how would you know?  Everything, reactants and products, is soluble in water.  You wouldn't be able to find them, in water, they'd exist as ions.

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I understand Citric's form complexs with the metals

Yes.

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as the metal sulfate dissociates.

No.  I mean. yes.  i mean, what?  Your statement here is irrelevant, to the statement before.  So, its not correct.  Or is correct in parts, but not strung together.  This comes up, from time to time, when people just string buzzwords together.  The only helpful thing we can say is, "No" or "Try again."

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And I think the sulfates act as a weak base and grab a hydrogen from a water molecule but not 100'percent sure.

Kindly provide a literate source for this statement.  It think its wrong, or, like the one before, made up of truths that are non-sequitors.

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This is revelant in forming complexed fertilizer solutions.

It is?  Dang.  I wouldn't have pulled that from the context to this point.

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I am asking so I can understand the correct balanced equation of theses reactions.

Interesting.  OK.  If a reaction doesn't happen, then it can't be balanced.  Also, there is no reaction, when you dissolve something, in something else.

But lets work with this.  You're forming citrate complexes.  What is their structure?  How are they formed, from ions, in solution?  What is the structure of a complex in general, and citrate complexes in particular?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coordination_complex
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