Chemical Forums

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Sponsored links

Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: quantum numbers  (Read 806 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Mona lizza

  • New Member
  • **
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 6
quantum numbers
« on: July 25, 2017, 04:53:20 AM »

As we know that when n=5 azimuthal quantum numbers has value 0,1,2,3,4 it means that 5 shell consist s,p,d,f,g orbital,but we know that g never appear in any atom so n-1 rule is wrong???? :(
Logged

mjc123

  • Chemist
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Mole Snacks: +180/-8
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1276
Re: quantum numbers
« Reply #1 on: July 25, 2017, 06:41:54 AM »

No known atom has electrons in a g orbital in the ground state, but that doesn't mean that g orbitals don't exist. Electrons can occupy g orbitals in an excited state.
Currently recognised elements go up to 118 (oganesson), with complete 7s, 5f, 6d and 7p shells. Once you get beyond that (if you do), you will start filling up 8s, then perhaps 5g, etc.
Logged

Mona lizza

  • New Member
  • **
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 6
Re: quantum numbers
« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2017, 06:51:50 AM »

I have red somewhere that when n=5 azimuthal quantum number 0,1,2,3,4(we skip 3) why + if there is g orbital also than what is its shape
Logged

mjc123

  • Chemist
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Mole Snacks: +180/-8
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1276
Re: quantum numbers
« Reply #3 on: July 30, 2017, 10:37:25 PM »

Google "g orbital shapes"
Logged

Enthalpy

  • Chemist
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Mole Snacks: +171/-48
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2234
Re: quantum numbers
« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2017, 01:42:44 AM »

Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
 

Mitch Andre Garcia's Chemical Forums 2003-Present.

Page created in 0.287 seconds with 23 queries.