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Author Topic: Acid reactivity vs metals chart  (Read 307 times)

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pcm81

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Acid reactivity vs metals chart
« on: January 12, 2018, 11:50:42 AM »

Hi. It's been about 15 years since my last college chemistry class and i can't remember the name of the property i am looking for to find it online. As I recall there is more to acids reacting with metals than acid disassociation constant characterizing acid strength... After all a strong sulphuric acid cant dissolve gold, but HCL + Nitric mixture can. What is the name of the propetry i am looking for that will tell me which acids can and cannot dissolve which metals. I think it has something to do with nobilty of metals too...



Thanks ahead.
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Borek

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Re: Acid reactivity vs metals chart
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2018, 12:03:29 PM »

I don't think there is a single term covering what you are looking for. Some metals need strong oxidizers to dissolve. H+ is an oxidizer, but not strong enough. In general it is about redox potentials, but as a rule of thumb you can use reactivity series.

Hopefully some of these keywords will ring a bell for you.
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pcm81

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Re: Acid reactivity vs metals chart
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2018, 04:54:07 PM »

I don't think there is a single term covering what you are looking for. Some metals need strong oxidizers to dissolve. H+ is an oxidizer, but not strong enough. In general it is about redox potentials, but as a rule of thumb you can use reactivity series.

Hopefully some of these keywords will ring a bell for you.

If my memory serves me right it has something to do with oxidation reduction potential like in this chart:
http://eesemi.com/ox_potential.htm

Which is why HF pretty much dissolves everything since F has such much high potential.
Just was not sure if there is a table for acids vs metals allowing me not to think...
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Borek

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Re: Acid reactivity vs metals chart
« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2018, 10:06:10 PM »

If my memory serves me right it has something to do with oxidation reduction potential like in this chart:

Yes.

Quote
Which is why HF pretty much dissolves everything since F has such much high potential.

No. It is elemental fluorine (F2) that is a strong oxidizer, in HF fluorine is in a form of fluoride anion (F-), which is already reduced and not that reactive. Yes, it still has some interesting properties.
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Enthalpy

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Re: Acid reactivity vs metals chart
« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2018, 02:05:03 PM »

The corrosion resistance of metals does not depend simply on a redox potential. It depends much on the quality of the surface oxide.

For instance Ta resists corrosion very well but isn't a noble metal.

Or Cr makes steel stainless despite its redox potentials are similar to Fe.
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