Chemical Forums

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Sponsored links

Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Questions on alcohols: dehydration, boiling point.  (Read 330 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Daiana

  • New Member
  • **
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 8
Questions on alcohols: dehydration, boiling point.
« on: January 13, 2018, 06:37:04 AM »

Questions are attached
Logged

wildfyr

  • Global Moderator
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Mole Snacks: +55/-6
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 507
Re: Questions on alcohols: dehydration, boiling point.
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2018, 09:41:43 AM »

Daiana, I see you have posted homework questions across several forums. It is a rule here that with each question you must show a bona-fide attempt to have solved it yourself before we will help you. See the red forum rule link at the top.
Logged

Daiana

  • New Member
  • **
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 8
Re: Questions on alcohols: dehydration, boiling point.
« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2018, 09:14:03 PM »

Hi, haven't I posted the solutions? I mean that I posted the solutions to check them. I didn't post just the bare questions. I have posted my attempts.
Logged

Daiana

  • New Member
  • **
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 8
Re: Questions on alcohols: dehydration, boiling point.
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2018, 10:47:56 PM »

Also, I am not in an English-speaking country or English-speaking school. I am doing self-study. I hope to study in Germany one day, so I am preparing... My questions aren't homework questions. I simply don't have anyone to ask subject questions in English here, where I am right now.
Logged

AdiDex

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Mole Snacks: +14/-12
  • Offline Offline
  • Gender: Male
  • Posts: 287
Re: Questions on alcohols: dehydration, boiling point.
« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2018, 08:50:01 PM »

Hydrogen bonding is all about the pulling the shared pair of electrons from bonded Hydrogen, making it Hδ+.Then this partially charged hydrogen is enough to polarise the neighbouring electrons and make a weak bond known as the hydrogen bond.
So all you need a highly electronegative atom to polarise the Hydrogen, Oxygen is more electronegative than Sulfur.
(Generally, these electronegative atoms includes only Fluorine, Oxygen, Nitrogen)


In the question, it is asked to write Constitutional Isomers, Cis-Trans isomerism is part stereoisomerism. You don't have to worry about that.
Although Elimination reactions generally lead to the most stable product in major quantity. So trans product will be major. But it can also give you the wrong product, you have to consider the stereochemistry of the reactants. In this question, it doesn't matter so you are good to go.

You can always draw the all the products in single reaction separated by plus sign until unless you don't  have to show the mechanism, it can be messy to show every mechanism in a single chemical equation.

Check Chemspider.com

You can write it in this manner, but it looks weird. So try to make structures as you have drawn in Computerised Image.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
 

Mitch Andre Garcia's Chemical Forums 2003-Present.

Page created in 0.058 seconds with 23 queries.