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Author Topic: The nature of matter  (Read 1833 times)

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Borek

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Re: The nature of matter
« Reply #15 on: April 15, 2018, 09:50:23 PM »

There should be a reason for the state changes between similar elements in regards to a couple particles

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I feel it's not very scientific to merely state it s the nature of the elements , not that anyone is.

I feel like you are missing the point. Not every question has an answer, I already gave examples of such questions.

There is no problem with scientifically explaining properties of carbon and nitrogen based on their electron configuration. Not easy, it requires quantum mechanics, but perfectly doable. Trick is, it doesn't answer the original question. Original question assumed (even if indirectly) there exists a continuity of properties that is a reason behind change from the solid to the gas, and there is no such continuity.
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Kalium

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Re: The nature of matter
« Reply #16 on: April 18, 2018, 06:17:52 PM »

I understood the point , and I can see the historic view of not having answers to current phenomenon.

I mostly wasn't looking for a particular answer either , I suppose , or not even really , I was stating the unique limited amount of knockdown evidence for states we have , or maybe not even because I've not really read any new or much older material for that matter on it.

It wasn't aimed at anyone . Just an observation of intrigue because of the novelty of the op question . I wasn't even lol asking for an experts opinion , it was subjective lol.


"Trick is, it doesn't answer the original question. Original question assumed (even if indirectly) there exists a continuity of properties that is a reason behind change from the solid to the gas, and there is no such continuity."

I would be very much interested in reading material that proves that the continuity does not exist ....and not to have any pride issues on it , mainly only to see what research has progressed to on it , and if or a limit has been reached for what ever reason and the question abandoned altogether .

There are many questions in science that are not currently possible to begin to answer . Absence of reasons for state changes is not a particular one that sits well with me . ha it's not like I have a choice other wise if it doesn't , it's just that it seems absurd to me subjectively that it would not . It feels closer to a lack of understanding , but again, I'm not well enough versed .

I never intending on disagreements with peers on subjects I've not mastered material. The op question only forces me to imagine question s about the nature as well . Even if the answer is it doesn't have and answer . But that just is not something I have an easy time with personally . I'm more apt to think that it doesn't have an answer yet .

But I may know less , well I can admit openly , I know not much more that anything about it to even decern if it woukd have a pattern or not .

Lol I only found the question one of interest was all .
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