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Author Topic: How to calculate the maximum charge of an atom or a molecule?  (Read 278 times)

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IBM

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How to calculate the maximum charge of an atom or a molecule?
« on: August 10, 2018, 12:24:39 AM »

How to calculate the maximum charge of an atom or a molecule?
As we know the equivalent weight = atomic weight / maximum charge
Al, Ca and O2
Al, E = 27/3 = 9
Ca, E = 40/2 = 20
O2, E = 16/2 = 8
I see on the books that the charges of Al, Ca and O2 are 3, 2 and 2 but
How to find the charges of Al, Ca and O2?
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chenbeier

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Re: How to calculate the maximum charge of an atom or a molecule?
« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2018, 03:37:24 AM »

Your question is not understandable. The answer you had already given. The charge has something to do if a atom can loose electrons or can gain electrons. Check about the built up about atoms, in the easiest way the model according Bohr. Also the table of periodic system.
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chenbeier

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Re: How to calculate the maximum charge of an atom or a molecule?
« Reply #2 on: August 13, 2018, 03:51:49 AM »

I still dont understand your calculations.
One I think is the molar mass, but I dont understand your divisions. For oxygen O2 you us only molar mass of one atom.
« Last Edit: August 13, 2018, 04:12:54 AM by chenbeier »
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