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Author Topic: solubility of aspirin  (Read 52539 times)

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cuongt

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solubility of aspirin
« on: July 16, 2006, 12:02:17 PM »

why is aspirin insoluble in water? is it because it only has one OH bond(hydorgen bond) and also its structure is a large non polar component?
and when NaHCO3 is added why does it make aspirin soluble in water?( this i dont get  :D)
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Yggdrasil

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Re: solubility of aspirin
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2006, 12:31:07 PM »

Yes, since most of aspirin is non-polar, it is insoluble in water.

For your second question, think about how sodium bicarbonate reacts with asprinin (hint: aspirin = acetylsalicylic acid) and how this changes the properties of aspirin to make it more soluble.
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cuongt

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Re: solubility of aspirin
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2006, 02:07:04 PM »

TY TY TY ROFL  :P :D
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Albert

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Re: solubility of aspirin
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2006, 08:58:06 PM »

For your second question, think about how sodium bicarbonate reacts with aspirin (hint: aspirin = acetylsalicylic acid) and how this changes the properties of aspirin to make it more soluble.

NaHCO3 reduces disaggregation time due to effervescence. The reaction between NaHCO3 and acetylsalicylic acid yields H2CO3 (hence, H2O + CO2). The bubbles act like an explosive.
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Yggdrasil

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Re: solubility of aspirin
« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2006, 09:24:55 PM »

However, powdered acetylsalicylic acid is still going to be largely insoluble in water.  The main purpose of the sodium bicarbonate is to deprotonate the carboxylic acid in acetylsalicylic acid to produce a sodium acetylsalicylate salt which is much more soluble in water (due to the presence of a charged carboxylate group).  The effervesence, as Albert noted, will help the sodium acetlysalicylate disolve faster.
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cuongt

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Re: solubility of aspirin
« Reply #5 on: July 16, 2006, 09:48:31 PM »

wow soo much depth thanx for explanation and help guys  ;)
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