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Author Topic: question about chemical reaction: what sweating does to teflon  (Read 1508 times)

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empleat

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question about chemical reaction: what sweating does to teflon
« on: November 27, 2018, 02:11:44 PM »

Hello,
i have problem, my hand is sweating during gaming and on bottom of my mouse feet creates spots from sweating. It is tricky, because every human can have different chemical substances in their sweat. I am interested what sweating does to teflon surface, if it changes surface itself, there is probably nothing i can do. But if only sticks to it, maybe i could use cloth with a bit bleach, or some cleaner. But i don't want to damage it, it is better to don't do anything, if not sure. For example water damages cloth mousepad, i have that from support. I don't know if it is good idea try to clean mouse feet with anything. I want to clean it, because my mouse feet wore out quickly.
Thank you for answer.
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wildfyr

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Re: question about chemical reaction: what sweating does to teflon
« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2018, 04:33:29 PM »

If it is just teflon, it cannot be harmed by anything cleaning agent you have at home. Rubbing alcohol (isopropanol) is a nice first choice.
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Re: question about chemical reaction: what sweating does to teflon
« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2018, 11:35:14 PM »

Do they make mouse feet out of Teflon?
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Re: question about chemical reaction: what sweating does to teflon
« Reply #3 on: November 28, 2018, 12:06:40 AM »

Do they make mouse feet out of Teflon?

Apparently they do make replacement Teflon mouse feet for gaming.   

Yea - anything should do - it is pretty chemically resistant.
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empleat

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Re: question about chemical reaction: what sweating does to teflon
« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2018, 02:34:59 AM »

Ye i meant this isopropyl alcohol, instead of bleach, i forgot how it called.
Quick question yet, if i clean mouse feet with this and yet i wipe mouse feet with cloth, before placing mouse back on mousepad. It won't be cleaned from isopropyl to 100%, i read that isopropyl alcohol can leave stains on cloth.
And it is not good idea to use water to clean cloth by mousepad manufacturer, so i am not sure it is good idea to clean with water mouse feet either and again not sure i would be 100% free from isopropyl than, if i cleaned mouse feet with water after using isopropyl.
What is your opinion on this, i probably ask yet razer support on isopropyl and cleaning mouse feet with it.
I am paranoid, because my mouse feet and mousepad wore out quickly and i use microfiber cloth and gently wipe mousepad and mouse feet with it after gaming session, but it gradually build up and yet dust is problem, it sticks around mouse feet, because there is small hole around it and onto mouse pad and i cant get it out, small pieces of dust.
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Re: question about chemical reaction: what sweating does to teflon
« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2018, 02:48:50 AM »

Ye i meant this isopropyl alcohol, instead of bleach, i forgot how it called.
Quick question yet, if i clean mouse feet with this and yet i wipe mouse feet with cloth, before placing mouse back on mousepad. It won't be cleaned from isopropyl to 100%, i read that isopropyl alcohol can leave stains on cloth.

It evaporates pretty quickly - I would guess that it would be fine to use IPA.  I wouldn't personally use bleach as it would taker longer to evaporate and I wouldn't want it on my hands...  IPA though? - no problem - it will evap off in no time.
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empleat

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Re: question about chemical reaction: what sweating does to teflon
« Reply #6 on: November 29, 2018, 04:33:30 AM »

Okay stil problem is sweat sunk even to mouse pad. And mousepad cannot be clean with water, i got that from support and even from experience it is worse.
And isopropyl alcohol can leave stains, how to clean mouse pad from sweat than ?
Because during gaming session my hand sweats and i can't clean mousepad with micro fiber cloth every 15 min.
And isopropyl alcohol maybe not idea on cloth pad, it cause stains i read and i don't know if it cant damage it, i ask support yet about this.
And do you have idea what it could do to cloth mousepad ?
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Re: question about chemical reaction: what sweating does to teflon
« Reply #7 on: November 29, 2018, 05:00:40 AM »

Okay stil problem is sweat sunk even to mouse pad. And mousepad cannot be clean with water, i got that from support and even from experience it is worse.
And isopropyl alcohol can leave stains, how to clean mouse pad from sweat than ?
Because during gaming session my hand sweats and i can't clean mousepad with micro fiber cloth every 15 min.
And isopropyl alcohol maybe not idea on cloth pad, it cause stains i read and i don't know if it cant damage it, i ask support yet about this.
And do you have idea what it could do to cloth mousepad ?

Your sweat is only going to stain the mouse mat and at worse smell after sometime.  Can't you just replace the mouse mat when it gets smelly or horrible?

When you say that water damages it...  do you mean it discolours it or stains it?  If that is all then is it really a problem?

How about having, lets say, 2 mouse matts... when the first is too stained from sweat or is too horrid to look at or use then chuck it in the washing machine and use the second. Let it dry thoroughly before reusing it -  I bet that the 'damage' to the mouse matt is only going to be visual fading of the colours in the pictures on it or something like that - I can't see what actual damage it is going to do that would stop it from doing its job. It's only a bit of foam with a bit of fabric over it.   OR - I think you can get plastic types which I presume you can wipe.




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empleat

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Re: question about chemical reaction: what sweating does to teflon
« Reply #8 on: November 29, 2018, 07:58:12 AM »

No water damages its surface and it has friction afterwards, razer support literally warned me to not use water to clean mousepad. Problem is how to clean it, only wiping it with dry micro fiber cloth won't cut it. And don't know if isopropyl alcohol would be good idea to clean mousepad surface, that's why i wanted your opinion, or some other option maybe.
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Re: question about chemical reaction: what sweating does to teflon
« Reply #9 on: November 29, 2018, 11:28:06 AM »

Without any information on what the mousepad is made of, it's impossible to know, but I find it unlikely that water actually damages the material itself. Rather, damage and loss of surface properties from cleaning with water is probably due to two things: (1) mechanical shear resulting from scrubbing damages whatever fabric weave is responsible for the surface properties (Kind of like how they tell you to blot, not scrub, a stain out of a carpet or furniture upholstery); (2) residue from hard water or detergents remains on the surface, which also changes surface properties. Your sweat is mostly water, so the mousepad is getting wet anyway, and so is just about any cleaning agent you are likely to find. Pure solvents like alcohol are more likely to do lasting harm than water is, particularly if the material has some kind of hydrophobic surface coating.

My advice would be to use a wet, but not drenched, soft cloth and blot the pad clean. Then blot dry. I'd use distilled water instead of tap water, and I would try to avoid detergents where possible.

Not 100% sure what product you have, but I found the following link from Razer about their mouse pads and cleaning:

https://support.razer.com/gaming-mice-and-mats/razer-goliathus-control-edition/

They allow for cleaning with water, just not fully submerging it.

If what you have is the Golianthus brand, I looked and couldn't find what the fabric actually is, but the promotion website indicate only that it is a microtextured fabric. The microtexture (small strand diameter, tight weave) is what gives the surface low friction properties.

https://www.razer.com/gaming-mouse-mats/razer-goliathus-speed

Most microtextured fabrics are made from artificial materials like Nylons or polyesters. These would not be damaged unless they were allowed to soak for a long time. Nylons and polyesters can and do swell in the presence of water, which would damage the weave, but you'd have to expose them to a lot of water and over a long period of time and/or at high temperature. I have microfiber glass cleaning cloths that I use all the time to clean optics at work, and they get damp, and they're fine.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microfiber

So: were it my pad, I'd use as little water as possible and don't scrub. Alternatively, you'll have to use a dirty mat, which probably will disrupt the low friction properties as much as any slight weave damage will. You may also want to spot test the cleaning process on the corner or something first.
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Re: question about chemical reaction: what sweating does to teflon
« Reply #10 on: December 04, 2018, 02:59:44 AM »

No water damages its surface and it has friction afterwards, razer support literally warned me to not use water to clean mousepad. Problem is how to clean it, only wiping it with dry micro fiber cloth won't cut it. And don't know if isopropyl alcohol would be good idea to clean mousepad surface, that's why i wanted your opinion, or some other option maybe.

What is it made from then?   Can't you just get a couple of those foam ones with printed fabric over it? I think you can wash those easy enough and cycle them like I suggested.

Without any information on what the mousepad is made of, it's impossible to know, but I find it unlikely that water actually damages the material itself.

Quite. I can't think of what material used in a mouse mat that would be damaged by water.   
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Re: question about chemical reaction: what sweating does to teflon
« Reply #11 on: January 09, 2019, 07:08:37 AM »


My advice would be to use a wet, but not drenched, soft cloth and blot the pad clean. Then blot dry. I'd use distilled water instead of tap water, and I would try to avoid detergents where possible.


That didn't work, it made it even, worse. I used microfiber cloth for glass, which was recommended me from razer and moisten it in water and than blot mousepad, afterwards, friction is even worse. Mouse reacts so sluggish.
Don't try that !!!
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Re: question about chemical reaction: what sweating does to teflon
« Reply #12 on: January 09, 2019, 10:35:04 PM »


My advice would be to use a wet, but not drenched, soft cloth and blot the pad clean. Then blot dry. I'd use distilled water instead of tap water, and I would try to avoid detergents where possible.


That didn't work, it made it even, worse. I used microfiber cloth for glass, which was recommended me from razer and moisten it in water and than blot mousepad, afterwards, friction is even worse. Mouse reacts so sluggish.
Don't try that !!!


Buy a different make of mouse mat. I am certain there are many made from various different materials...  I can't think of any of them that are actually damaged by water - so maybe it's just the brand you are buying. Try a different brand that use a different material.


And you didn't answer our question   -  what material is your one made from? 

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