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Author Topic: How to Test the Possibility of a Compound  (Read 382 times)

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R3negade

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How to Test the Possibility of a Compound
« on: January 20, 2019, 11:10:41 PM »

Hey folks!
I am currently a freshman in uni and I find chemistry to be rather interesting. While I am not that knowledgeable because I am in beginning university level classes, I still have a question...

The other day I was messing with the ball and stick models making compounds and I ended up with 10 Hydrogen atoms, 3 Carbon atoms, 2 Nitrogen atoms, 2 Sulfur atoms, and 1 Oxygen atom. Wherever the image is posted is my quick sketch of the compound before I had to deconstruct it. Sorry it sucks...

So what I am looking for is a method to verify that this is indeed a possible compound that could theoretically exist. I understand that this is most likely knowledge way above which I have been taught since I believe this to be in the realm of organic chemistry but I figured where better to find an answer than a chemistry forum. Thanks!
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mjc123

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Re: How to Test the Possibility of a Compound
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2019, 11:58:29 PM »

You seem to treat S and N as if they were tetravalent, like C. Is this correct?
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OrganicDan96

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Re: How to Test the Possibility of a Compound
« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2019, 10:43:29 AM »

it won't exist as a neutral compound as you have two many bonds to nitrogen and sulphur. of course you can have nitrogen with 4 bonds but it takes a positive charge and you would have some negative counter ion to balance the charge.
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