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Author Topic: Why does acetic acid + NaOH have a larger ∆Hrxn than HCl + NaOH?  (Read 280 times)

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labratattack

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referred here from reddit.

Why does acetic acid + NaOH have a larger ∆Hrxn than HCl + NaOH?

This question comes from general chemistry II lab and is not for a grade (not sure if that matters here or not), but more of a challenge question. Will someone help me understand? Thank you
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mjc123

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Re: Why does acetic acid + NaOH have a larger ∆Hrxn than HCl + NaOH?
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2019, 10:32:18 PM »

What is the actual reaction that happens in HCl + NaOH?
What else happens in AcOH + NaOH?
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labratattack

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Re: Why does acetic acid + NaOH have a larger ∆Hrxn than HCl + NaOH?
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2019, 06:44:09 AM »

HCl and NaOH both completely dissociate and form water plus ions. Acetic acid is a weak acid and doesn’t completely dissociate but NaOH does. So, because acetic acid doesn’t completely dissociate it’s ΔHrxn is greater?

Is that on the right track?
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mjc123

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Re: Why does acetic acid + NaOH have a larger ∆Hrxn than HCl + NaOH?
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2019, 10:34:24 PM »

Yes. Can you write equations for the reactions that occur? Assume (as I assume the question does) that you start with aqueous solutions of the reagents, so you don't have to consider the dissociation of e.g. NaOH - it's already dissociated.
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