Chemical Forums

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Sponsored links

Pages: [1]   Go Down

Author Topic: Diesel motor as a laboratory tool  (Read 366 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Shannon Dove

  • Regular Member
  • ***
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 14
Diesel motor as a laboratory tool
« on: February 10, 2019, 06:23:32 PM »

For hydrogen reduction requiring high pressure....feed hydrogen gas into a diesel motor, pure hydrogen with no oxygen, and make it loop so that when it comes out of the cylinder on the exhaust stroke it's fed back to the intake manifold, and the material that you want to reduce, dissolve it in an organic liquid such as diesel or kerosene, then feed it into the injectors,...then just spin the motor like you are trying to start it up.
The solvent with your organic compound will be injected into very high pressure hydrogen when the Piston is near the top.
Of course heat is a major problem because the hydrogen is compressed really fast with no chance to cool...but we can discuss this problem
Logged

pgk

  • Chemist
  • Full Member
  • *
  • Mole Snacks: +76/-21
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 716
Re: Diesel motor as a laboratory tool
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2019, 08:03:08 AM »

What about safety?
Although not being a specialist in diesel motor technology, I think that when the piston quickly moves away from the top, compression will be followed by violent decompression = detonation of hydrogen in excess.
Logged

Shannon Dove

  • Regular Member
  • ***
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 14
Re: Diesel motor as a laboratory tool
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2019, 08:37:37 PM »

As for safety, the hydrogen won't detonate because there isn't an oxidizer, but if air should be accidentally introduced to the system, the motor will just start up and run, diesel motors can handle explosion from various fuels such as ether, ethonal, diesel, gasoline, propane, etc, etc, and oxidizers such as pressurized air and nitrous oxide. If the mixture explodes in the intake or exhaust manifold instead of the cylinder,... well just how hard is it to make sure air doesn't enter the system?
I want to add some more information to my idea. After the solvent is injected into the cylinder and the Piston goes down, the solvent hydrogen mixture will then be pushed into the exhaust manifold. Now remember, the injectors turn this solvent into a really fine mist that acts like a gas, as this mist goes onto the exhaust manifold some of it will turn back to liquid that will collect in a low place between the exhaust and intake manifold (remember the two manifolds are connected so it can continuesly loop). Now the liquid is pumped from the manifold back to the injectors , where it can be injected again into the hydrogen. So the hydrogen goes in a loop from the cylinder, to the exhaust manifold, then to the intake manifold, them back to the cylinder. Then just keep turning the motor for as long as necessary.
It doesn't need to be a diesel motor, a gasoline motor can be used, with the solvent injected into the intake manifold instead of direct injection into the cylinder.
Heat is a major issue because as it's compressed to a 20 to 1 ratio it will get extremely hot. To answer this problem, cool the hydrogen with dry ice before it enters the cylinder. Also pack dry ice around the motor's radiator to get the coolent very cold, and use alcohol in the motor's coolent system
Logged

rolnor

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Mole Snacks: +35/-3
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 471
Re: Diesel motor as a laboratory tool
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2019, 03:59:00 AM »

Are there any positiv things with this system compared to a PARR apparatus or similar? I think you want a high pressure a long time for hydrogenation to take place, I dont se the point?
Logged

pgk

  • Chemist
  • Full Member
  • *
  • Mole Snacks: +76/-21
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 716
Re: Diesel motor as a laboratory tool
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2019, 06:15:30 AM »

Detonation can be avoided in absence of air. But explosion cannot be avoided due to the instant decompression of unreacted hydrogen in excess, even if this being super-cooled. Besides, hydrogen will momently be liquefied under 2,000-3,000 bar, which is the ordinary diesel motor pressure when the piston reaches the top; or if being cooled enough, under 8-10 bar, which would be the corresponding pressure of a gasoline motor at 20/1 compression.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
 

Mitch Andre Garcia's Chemical Forums 2003-Present.

Page created in 0.082 seconds with 23 queries.