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Specialty Chemistry Forums => Chemical Engineering Forum => Topic started by: humptydumptychmistry on November 11, 2021, 09:57:51 AM

Title: Is it possible to engineer a liquid with a high density (20g/cm3) ?
Post by: humptydumptychmistry on November 11, 2021, 09:57:51 AM
Hi, absolute newbie here.

I'm wondering if it's possible to create a liquid substance at regular room temperature and pressure, that would have a significantly higher density than water.

Ideally about 20 grams per cubic centimeter, or higher. (20 times more dense than water)

But any increase in density would help. Even 5-10 grams per cubic centimeter would be great!

I tried searching this through Google and couldn't find a relevant answer.

The resulting substance should not be toxic, like mercury. It should be perfectly safe for humans (and plants and animals for that matter, but at least for humans)

If it is possible, can you provide any information or guidance (even generic directions) as to how it would be done, and from what "parts"/atoms it would need to be done.

P.S. I understand this may be a dummy question, I am, after all, a dummy. I know almost nothing of chemistry. But help me out here, please.

Thank you.
Title: Re: Is it possible to engineer a liquid with a high density (20g/cm3) ?
Post by: Borek on November 11, 2021, 11:14:30 AM
Google "high density liquids", there is whole (even if small) industry behind the idea.

No, 20 g/mL is out of the question at RTP. Something around 4 g/mL is more reasonable.