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Chemistry Forums for Students => Organic Chemistry Forum => Topic started by: Mitch on March 13, 2005, 08:42:53 PM

Title: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Mitch on March 13, 2005, 08:42:53 PM
For Undergraduate Students

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Title: Organic Chemistry
Author: Nick Greeves
Description: The Clayden book is my favorite.  It's maybe a little advanced for someone encountering organic chem for the first time, but it's awesome nonetheless.--movie
 (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0198503466/thechemicalfo-20/104-3671508-3002355?%5Fencoding=UTF8&camp=1789&link%5Fcode=xm2)
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For Undergraduate Students

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Title: Organic Chemistry
Author: Robert T. Morrison
Description: I been using this book since my GCE A levels. It has proved very useful when I was studying for my STEP paper. Even now at university, this book explains chemistry concept in few paragraphs so clearly that my lecturer takes an hour to teach. The concepts are well-introduced and explained step by step. It doesnt presume alot of pre-knowledge, but it builds up its depth chronologically from the 1st chapter.--geodome
 (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0136436692/thechemicalfo-20/104-3671508-3002355?%5Fencoding=UTF8&camp=1789&link%5Fcode=xm2)
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For Undergraduate Students

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Title: Organic Chemistry
Author: K. Peter C. Vollhardt, Neil Eric Schore
Description: A great introduction into the field of Organic Chemistry. This is the undergraduate textbook for Organic Chemistry used at Berkeley.--Mitch
 (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0716743744/thechemicalfo-20?creative=125581&camp=2321&link_code=as1)
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For Graduate Students and Advanced Undergraduate Students

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Title: Advanced Organic Chemistry, Fourth Edition - Part A
Author: Francis A. Carey
Description: Carey and Sundberg has been the standard first-year grad. student text for a long time.  Personally, I don't like it that much.  There is a lot of good information, but I found the writing really bland and inaccessible.  I pretty much only use C&S to look up some raw data, not for explanation of concepts.  I might be in the minority on that though.--movies
 (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0306462435/thechemicalfo-20/104-3671508-3002355?%5Fencoding=UTF8&camp=1789&link%5Fcode=xm2)
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For Graduate Students and Advanced Undergraduate Students

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Title: Advanced Organic Chemistry, Fourth Edition - Part B
Author: Richard J. Sundberg
Description: Carey and Sundberg has been the standard first-year grad. student text for a long time.  Personally, I don't like it that much.  There is a lot of good information, but I found the writing really bland and inaccessible.  I pretty much only use C&S to look up some raw data, not for explanation of concepts.  I might be in the minority on that though.--movies
 (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0306462443/thechemicalfo-20/104-3671508-3002355?%5Fencoding=UTF8&camp=1789&link%5Fcode=xm2)
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For Graduate Students

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Title: March's Advanced Organic Chemistry
Author: Michael B. Smith, Jerry March
Description: For those serious about learning organic chemistry, this will touch on all advanced topics in the field.--Mitch
 (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0471585890/thechemicalfo-20?creative=125581&camp=2321&link_code=as1)
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For Graduate Students

Title: Modern organic synthesis
Author: Dale L Boger
Description: The Boger book (called Modern Organic Synthesis: Lecture Notes is kind of the same way, tons of information and references to primary literature, but no text explaining any of the concepts.  It really is just Boger's lecture notes.  I had to get this book for a class and so we covered a lot of the info in lecture.  Without the lecture it would be very, very difficult to learn from this book.  Definitely not a book for beginners, but if you have a good base in organic chem, it's a nice addition.  Also, it doesn't have an index (just a table of contents), so you have to look through it enough to know what is in there and where.  Finally, you have to buy this book directly from Scripps, and when I bought mine they didn't accept credit cards.  So I had to mail a check, wait for them to cash it, and then wait for the book to be shipped.  It took about three weeks in all.  That said, I use the book a lot.--movies
 (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0006RAVMY/thechemicalfo-20/104-3671508-3002355?%5Fencoding=UTF8&camp=1789&link%5Fcode=xm2)
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Mitch on July 29, 2005, 10:46:20 PM
updated
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: cbee on July 30, 2005, 10:37:25 PM
OK, I need to add my two cents. Vogel's Textbook of Practical Organic Chemistry.  It contains the basics on how to do many practical organic techniques as well as representitive experiments.  All the experiments are fairly basic, but I use the thing a suprising amount.  Somtimes you just want a quick prep for how to hydrolyse a nitrile to an acid/ ester, or how to set up a liquid ammoina reaction.  The section on derivatives may be a little out of touch (in fact most of the structure determination section is pretty old school) but it is still an invaluble source for a lot of basic chemistry.  Or am I just a hopless romantic?




Cisco
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: laotree on August 08, 2005, 10:41:06 PM
I have most of them, but I did not read every one of them. :-\
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: The Good Doctor on August 16, 2005, 01:53:32 PM
Indeed nice books!

What i also recommend for students is Streitweisers' " Organic Chemistry".
If u are more interested in design, or optimization to bioactive Pharma compounds and Medicinal Chemistry for industry then an absolute topper is "The Practise of Medicinal Chemistry" by Camille Wermuth (Elsevier).


Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: kokilduff on August 24, 2005, 11:41:59 PM
i would suggest to people struggling with ochem to check out this study guide:
http://organicchemistryhelp.com/ (http://organicchemistryhelp.com/)

it's really cheap ($25) and a great resource!! it helped me last semester.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Blueshawk on September 01, 2005, 12:24:23 AM
I found that    

Organic Chemistry 4th Ed  by  Bruice to be a good resource for
introductery O.chem.

Though one problem is the use of common names for cpds in the homework section of the book.

There is a complete study guide as well with answer to almost all the questions.

EDIT: spellcheck on chemistry
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Jiro on November 07, 2005, 04:31:10 AM
ya i hear there are some mistakes in the solutions manual but from my skim the solutions look good and explained well in the Organic Chemistry 4th Ed  by  Bruice text
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: galex on December 04, 2005, 07:06:48 AM
I really like they have such a good rating on Amazon. Sadly i do not know if i will have the chance to read any of it...in the near future.

Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Donaldson Tan on December 04, 2005, 06:12:33 PM
For Graduate Students

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Title: March's Advanced Organic Chemistry
Author: Michael B. Smith, Jerry March
Description: For those serious about learning organic chemistry, this will touch on all advanced topics in the field.--Mitch
 (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0471585890/thechemicalfo-20?creative=125581&camp=2321&link_code=as1)

LOL. That is the recommended organic chemistry textbook for 2nd year (undergraduate) organic synthesis here at my college. I gotta get that book next year (for my organic synthesis modules)
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Mitch on December 04, 2005, 06:17:15 PM
I would pitty anyone who had to learn organic synthesis from that book.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: movies on December 04, 2005, 08:07:03 PM
I would pitty anyone who had to learn organic synthesis from that book.

Seriously.  That book is good if you know a lot of organic chem. already and you are just looking to find out different ways of doing things, but it's awful when it comes to working through concepts.  Most of the book is made up of broad statements in a single sentence with a reference at the end.  If you want to understand anything in there, you have to either already know what they are talking about or go and look up the paper.  So, good because there is a great breadth of info, crummy because none of it is explained in any depth.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: webguy54 on February 26, 2006, 06:38:45 PM
Are there any good books that help teach IR and/or NMR spectroscopy? I'm having so much trouble with both.    ???
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: movies on February 27, 2006, 08:30:07 PM
The classic one is "Spectrometric Identification of Organic Compounds" by Silverstein and Webster.  It's great for NMR, but I haven't used it much for IR.  It goes into a lot of detail on how to look at NMRs and talks about some of the higher level experiments (e.g. 2D NMR) and what they can tell you.

Another good one is "Structure Determination of Organic Compounds" by Pretsh, Buhlmann, and Affolter.  It doesn't have much theory of spectroscopy, but it has tons of reference data, such as where you would expect the 13C signals of an aromatic ring with a CF3 substituent (i.e., trifluorotoluene) and what all the JC-F coupling constants are.

Most sophomore organic textbooks will have a chapter on spectroscopy as well, but they don't usually go in to a much depth.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Proileri on March 20, 2006, 12:37:08 AM
What we use in my Polytech is McMurry's Introduction to Organic Chemistry. Seems decent to me, starts from the very basics.

Anyone else have experience with it?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: jeeken on April 08, 2006, 06:58:07 AM
 :o
I wish i have enough time to read them all!
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: jameelhasan on April 18, 2006, 12:18:07 PM
 ;D CAREY's book should be a good book but i have not compared ??? it any others yet
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: movies on April 19, 2006, 12:30:48 AM
;D CAREY's book should be a good book but i have not compared ??? it any others yet

It's listed there in the first post.  I'm not terribly fond of that book, I have to admit.  I think that it's pretty dense and dry so it's hard to learn from.  It certainly has lots of facts in it though....

I'm honestly surprised that it has been the standard for intro grad level chemistry for so long.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Yggdrasil on April 20, 2006, 02:07:38 AM
I guess I'll put in my two cents.  I think Brown and Foote's organic chemistry text is a great book for undergraduates studying chemistry at the lower-division level.  This is the text I used throghout my lower-division study of organic chemistry and I found its explanations to be very clear and well organized.  Furthermore, the study guide that comes with the book is excellent.  It gives comprehensive explanations on how to solve the problems in the text which is especially useful for the spectroscopy sections.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: victor on May 14, 2006, 08:37:05 AM
I use two books of organic chemistry (the basic one, because I'm a biology student) which are written by Harold Hart and friends for the first book. Then for the second book, I use J.S. Fessenden and R.J. Fessenden. Umm..what's your opinion about those two??
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Dan on May 20, 2006, 01:24:29 PM
Norman and Coxon is very good, its called 'synthesis in organic chemistry' or something similar.

I would highly recommend Sykes - mechanism in organic chemistry to all first year undergrads.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: latent_lamp on May 29, 2006, 12:09:48 AM

I find that the undergraduate organic chemistry textbook that is being implemented in studying o-chem (1st and 2nd year) should reflect the study patterns as proposed by the lecturer. In this instance, Clayden and Greeves become somewhat redundant, since it is dissimilar to most units undertaken (especially here in NSW, Australia).

I have religiously used Wade and McMurry, the former is exceptional in explaining reactions mechanistically; however, it lacks severely in the spectroscopic side of things. McMurry was the prescribed and I used to look down on it, but when it came to exam revisions it was ok.

All three aforementioned books lack one major thing, they arent robust enough to carry out a 2 semester session in organic chemistry. If they are rich in the reactions and mechanisms they lack the spectroscopic definition. McMurry doesnt even come with a index table for common IR, H-HMR and C-NMR.


I would have to say that learning spectroscopy is best through lectures, my lecturer (Dr. Andrew Try) was exceptionally good in teaching us this, he actually made it fun. Pavia's spectroscopy is a good book to have, its cheap, straight to the point and relevant to undergraduate students.


I question the feasibility of having Vogel or March's, they cost a lot of money and are not of use to undergradaute students. They are only good for those who are doing postgraduate masters study, however even then it wont be used to a great extent. These a library books that should just be borrowed, it would be (in my opinion) senseless to purchase them, unless of course your prone to doing a lot of lab work.


The primary goal of an organic chemist varies depending on his/her speciality and therefore the books suggested, I believe are not relevant to people such as myself and indeed the authors mentioned superceded by newer more innovative writers that make learning o-chem easier.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: movies on May 29, 2006, 01:56:19 AM
I use March all the time!  If you're going to buy one big-book-o-organic-chem to use as a reference for the rest of your life, that'd be the one I would recommend.  The library is way too far away to go over there every time I want to know the A-value for an ethyl ester or check the mechanism for the Swern oxidation.  I agree it's not good for undergrad, but it's indispensable for a grad student in my opinion.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: latent_lamp on May 29, 2006, 02:20:36 AM

Yeah I am an undergrad, from my standpoint March's and other named reaction books are pretty much useless. I can relate to postgraduates such as yourself appreciating March but its just too dense for undergrad.

I had the same complaint with Voet and Voet for biochemistry, it does assume a lot and becomes far too pedantic. I used March's to find how the KMnO4 oxidative cleavage occurs in alkenes, it seems the mechanism is not fully unerstood. I could only go as far as determining how the sigma bonds are cleaved.

I do use March's, but its rare. At second year we are still dealing with o-chem from the perspective of functional groups, important reactions such as Diels Alder are not mentioned as yet. So having said that, when we arent delving so deep in named reactions, a cyclopedia on the topic wouldnt be too useful.

Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: movies on May 29, 2006, 12:49:57 PM
Ah, I see.  In your position I totally agree with you that March is not the best reference.  When I was an undergrad I learned a lot from named reaction books like Jack Li's, but there are better ones now such as the one by Mundy, Ellerd, and Favaloro.  I think that looking at mechanisms and following through them when they are correctly drawn is a great way to learn organic chemistry.  It takes some getting used to, but it makes figuring things out much easier in the future.

That said, it helps to know how all the functional groups behave before you delve into some of the more obscure mechanisms.  I think that you will find that very few mechanisms are really well understood at a fundamental level.  Most of them have maybe two or three pieces of evidence that are consistent with the proposed mechanism, but not definitive.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: latent_lamp on May 30, 2006, 12:41:22 AM

Well said, I totally agree with you. I enjoy organic chemistry because solving spectral and mechanistic problems tend to be fun. I still have to come to terms with considering all the variables, both energetic and structural when proposing mechanisms.

I am still struggling with the unique properties of functional groups in reactions, especially when a molecule has multiple groups attached to it.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: nilgnay2 on July 24, 2006, 03:04:29 AM
too many good books for us, but we have no time to read them!
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: chslj on July 30, 2006, 11:47:39 AM
How Can I get these books (PDF.files) Thank you
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: movies on July 30, 2006, 01:10:30 PM
You have to buy them.  We will not give out copywritten materials on these forums.  Some are available as PDF files from the publisher or through resellers like Amazon.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: liu_zp on August 12, 2006, 05:22:05 AM
????????????
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Borek on August 12, 2006, 05:25:09 AM
????????????

You have to post in English if you expect anyone to answer.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: ch3mfreak018 on August 24, 2006, 10:22:14 AM
oh... what Liu says that b the O chem books are good but they are expensive and do you have the time to read them throughly
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: wenfy on September 01, 2006, 11:17:12 AM
:o
I wish i have enough time to read them all!
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: wwzzyy1105 on September 02, 2006, 01:47:26 AM
oh,why cann't I dowload  these accessories? ??? ???
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: english on September 02, 2006, 02:06:05 AM
I'm using Bruice's Organic, 5th Edition.

It's a nice book with really good sample problems and 3D renders of molecules.  The only two downsides I'd have to add is some errors in the print (not typographical) and the solutions to many problems, including the end of chapter problems, are completely left out.  You must purchase the solutions manual at a local bookstore to get the answers, which I don't mind because it's nice to have a big nice manual with ALL the answers, but it's a bad way to make extra money off of you.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: wwzzyy1105 on September 02, 2006, 02:23:10 AM
The classic one is "Spectrometric Identification of Organic Compounds" by Silverstein and Webster.  It's great for NMR, but I haven't used it much for IR.  It goes into a lot of detail on how to look at NMRs and talks about some of the higher level experiments (e.g. 2D NMR) and what they can tell you.

Another good one is "Structure Determination of Organic Compounds" by Pretsh, Buhlmann, and Affolter.  It doesn't have much theory of spectroscopy, but it has tons of reference data, such as where you would expect the 13C signals of an aromatic ring with a CF3 substituent (i.e., trifluorotoluene) and what all the JC-F coupling constants are.

Most sophomore organic textbooks will have a chapter on spectroscopy as well, but they don't usually go in to a much depth.

Well, could you share it with me ?  Thanks
My E-mail: wwzzyy_1105@163.com
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: cc136520 on September 20, 2006, 07:54:53 AM
all of this books are so good!
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: greengiant on October 09, 2006, 08:51:35 PM
Nobody has mentioned Fleming's Frontier Orbitals and Organic Chemistry, the little black bible when it comes to understanding organic mechanisms.  ???
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Donaldson Tan on October 21, 2006, 11:02:00 AM
????????????

translation: these books are not bad, but they are expensive. I can't afford them. Moreover, there are so many online textbooks on organic chemistry. Would even anyone take the time to seriously read through every page in a textbook?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: ztzju on November 10, 2006, 02:18:32 PM
????????????
:ohappy and amasing to see chinese here.hello,Mr liu,nice to meet you here in a english forum. ;D
i suppose we can buy just one of the classic books and read it throughly.Then,if you like ,you can read the ebooks as a kind of supplyment.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: tbuihuu on November 25, 2006, 07:17:23 AM
good books, I want some books about spectrometry(special NMR), who know please help me
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: maurice on November 29, 2006, 09:16:26 PM
I have a book named<Pharmaceutical_Substances>,how about this book?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: CBond007 on December 24, 2006, 02:06:39 PM
Undergrad we used Ege OC text

Grad:
Adv. OC Part B 4th Ed. Carey/Sunberg
OSD by Silverstein
Use Ege, March, and Carey Part I as refs

If I had to learn the concepts from March, I would have quit on OC
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Chimed on January 05, 2007, 02:45:25 PM
A really good book to build up a background understanding of organic chemical processes is Modern Physical Organic Chemistry by Eric V. Anslyn and Dennis A. Dougherty. http://www.uscibooks.com/anslyn.htm Well worth the effort. The style is clear and explainations are detailed but not excessively so. It covers a lot of the same ground as the Carey and Sunberg books but has replaced their books recently in our Physical Organic Chemistry classes.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: movies on January 05, 2007, 04:15:40 PM
A really good book to build up a background understanding of organic chemical processes is Modern Physical Organic Chemistry by Eric V. Anslyn and Dennis A. Dougherty. http://www.uscibooks.com/anslyn.htm Well worth the effort. The style is clear and explainations are detailed but not excessively so. It covers a lot of the same ground as the Carey and Sunberg books but has replaced their books recently in our Physical Organic Chemistry classes.

I agree.  Excellent book that ought to be the new gold standard for phys. org.

Thankfully the rest of the world might be saved from slogging through Carey & Sundberg!
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: english on January 20, 2007, 08:23:50 PM
ya i hear there are some mistakes in the solutions manual but from my skim the solutions look good and explained well in the Organic Chemistry 4th Ed  by  Bruice text

I have the 5th edition and there are quite a few mistakes in the text as well. 
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: musiceast on January 29, 2007, 05:30:50 AM
I get it online
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: english on March 08, 2007, 03:47:38 AM
I'm getting this really awesome book called The Art of Writing Reasonable Organic Reaction Mechanisms, 2nd edition.

I'm just getting it because I want it for my own reading, but I read in other places that graduate students appear to use it for reviewing for their literature exams.



It teaches you to write mechanisms for the sake of them making chemical sense, not blindly memorizing them, which a lot of people tend to do.

Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: movies on March 08, 2007, 12:46:23 PM
That a pretty good book, and it certainly will teach you to avoid a lot of the common, silly errors that you see in mechanisms.  It teaches how to think in terms of mechanisms.

That said, I think it can be a little heavy-handed and absolute on some things where it isn't totally warranted.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: english on March 09, 2007, 01:06:03 AM
That a pretty good book, and it certainly will teach you to avoid a lot of the common, silly errors that you see in mechanisms.  It teaches how to think in terms of mechanisms.

That said, I think it can be a little heavy-handed and absolute on some things where it isn't totally warranted.

Thanks movies I haven't gotten it yet but I ordered it a couple of days ago.  I can't wait though.  Lots to learn.   :P
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: movies on March 09, 2007, 12:06:16 PM
That reminds me.  This book (http://www.amazon.com/Strategic-Applications-Reactions-Organic-Synthesis/dp/0124297854) by Kurti and Czako (two grad students, believe it or not) is probably the best name reactions book out there.  It's chock full of references (both the orginals and subsequent applications) and lots of examples and complete mechanisms.  Really a fantastic resource.

Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: mona on March 28, 2007, 01:31:36 AM
can you suggest a book which explains  c13nmr  in a simple manner?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: CBond007 on April 16, 2007, 01:03:47 AM
can you suggest a book which explains  c13nmr  in a simple manner?

I googled and got

http://www.wfu.edu/~ylwong/nmr/c13/

if you have the cash get the Silverstein spectroscopy book
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Wisemanleo on April 16, 2007, 10:28:04 PM
G. Marc Loudon's "Organic Chemistry" is a great book too  ;)

http://www.amazon.com/Organic-Chemistry-G-Marc-Loudon/dp/0195119991
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Dolphinsiu on June 15, 2007, 04:27:51 AM
Kitson, Trevor M. 'Organic chemistry: A guide to common themes'
is a good organic chemistry book to all of you!

It gives brief information about carbocation, carboanion and free radical. Also various examples of electrophilic and nucleophilic attack are listed. It is an easily understandable book and suitable for all high school / university student!
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: kiwi on June 20, 2007, 07:36:47 AM
Ha, Trevor was a lecturer of mine here in NZ. Small world i guess.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: profmsg on July 27, 2007, 10:37:54 AM
all books are very good and same books are very bad. Depends on what you are looking for. so i guess there is no good books nor bad books.
Depends on yourself. so i hate this topics
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Redsea on August 26, 2007, 10:49:01 AM
All book are very good
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: kalboz on September 06, 2007, 09:26:33 AM
thannnnnnnnkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkksssssssssssssss
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: bigwoklun on October 18, 2007, 10:13:11 AM
I used G.A.Taylors book: Organic Chemistry for students of biology and medicine. Good enough for my needs way back when I was a student....
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: willwinjy on October 27, 2007, 11:22:44 PM
All the books are useful, but they also cost a lot. where is the free text on line?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: AceIt! on October 28, 2007, 09:57:35 PM
hey, I am really new here..how do u post a question/answer???
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: agrobert on October 31, 2007, 10:05:56 PM
Pikhal-Shulgin and Total Synthesis-Nicolau
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: ahmed on November 09, 2007, 01:36:45 PM
nice book
but i need free books
coz i"m from iraq
i cant buy this books
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Serenagreene on December 08, 2007, 01:13:45 PM
You can use Daley & Daley Organic Chemistry

it's free, you just have to register - http://www.ochem4free.info/?q=node/1

-Serena
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: PAY on December 12, 2007, 12:09:03 PM
I would pitty anyone who had to learn organic synthesis from that book.
Why? This if wonderfull book! I really like it. But it has some drawbacks, such as little illustrative and factical material (most of reactions are given in common schemes).
I think, that the best organic chemistry books - is articles!!!(Especially Chemical Reviews and many others)
I from Russia, and we have fine OC book - Reutov, Kurtz, Butin - "Organic chemistry"/ If anybody wants this book, I may shared with him by any fileshared system! Good-bye!
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Cuttlefish on December 22, 2007, 02:09:03 PM
I am a second year chemistry undergraduate in the UK and I highly recommend Organic Chemistry by Clayden, Greeves, Warren and Wothers.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Freyth on December 24, 2007, 08:49:27 AM
I'm currently doing Chemistry in GCE A Levels and in my second and last year of studying in a Junior College (I'm 17 turning 18 next year), and would like a good chemistry book to help me through Organic Chemistry. Any suggestions?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: sjh9 on January 17, 2008, 12:37:10 AM
That reminds me.  This book (http://www.amazon.com/Strategic-Applications-Reactions-Organic-Synthesis/dp/0124297854) by Kurti and Czako (two grad students, believe it or not) is probably the best name reactions book out there.  It's chock full of references (both the orginals and subsequent applications) and lots of examples and complete mechanisms.  Really a fantastic resource.



You saved me from having to post this.  I second the recommendation of this book!


 Grossman's book on mechanisms is also very good:
http://www.amazon.com/Writing-Reasonable-Organic-Reaction-Mechanisms/dp/0387954686/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1200548069&sr=8-1

For NMR:  http://www.amazon.com/Basic-One-Two-Dimensional-NMR-Spectroscopy/dp/3527312331/ref=pd_bbs_sr_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1200548103&sr=1-3




Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: mass on February 03, 2008, 02:28:08 PM
whats the best book for somone doing pharmacy (in uk) and struggling with organic chemistry badly. I am not even getting the basics.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Kryolith on February 03, 2008, 02:48:56 PM

(https://www.chemicalforums.com/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Frcm-images.amazon.com%2Fimages%2FP%2F0716743744.01.TZZZZZZZ&hash=34750a0f98dce5c2b00124ee3084ec59)   
Title: Organic Chemistry
Author: K. Peter C. Vollhardt, Neil Eric Schore
Description: A great introduction into the field of Organic Chemistry. This is the undergraduate textbook for Organic Chemistry used at Berkeley.--Mitch
 (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0716743744/thechemicalfo-20?creative=125581&camp=2321&link_code=as1)

It describes reactions and specially the "organic thinking" very detailed (much text). Great for beginners.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: glycogrl07 on February 27, 2008, 09:59:37 PM
I would recommend Organic Chemistry by Paula Yurkanis Bruice.  She is an extraordinary author and the mechanisms are easy to understand, examples are great and the solutions manual is very helpful.  The text includes multiple tables of information that summarize rules and memory keys throughout the chapters.  These were helpful in learning the material.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Chudasama on March 16, 2008, 01:50:09 PM
Frontier Orbitals and Organic Chemistry by Ian Fleming gave me an excellent introduction to Frontier Orbtials in Organic Chemistry...i especially liked the cycloadditiona and sigmatropic rearrangement sections
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: reioiow on March 22, 2008, 12:59:15 PM
Hi,
I am looking for a comprehensive reference showing many mechanisms of chemical reaction.

I currently have 'Introduction to Organic Chemistry' by William Brown and Thomas Poon.
Eventhough the book's got some pretty good mechanisms, I am looking for a good reference to explain more advance and more complex chemical reactions.

I am doing a medicinal chemistry subject, which is pretty advanced.

Thanks for any suggestion.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: weiguxp on March 31, 2008, 09:44:27 PM
I'm looking for a book i used back in year 2. Its an organic chemistry work book with synthesis practice questions (around half a page). The answer would directly follow it on the next part of the page. I found it extremely useful for learning and want to find it again.

Anyone have any ideas?

its a really old book.. maybe by warren but i couldn't find it again under that name
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: movies on April 01, 2008, 01:24:55 PM
I think the book you are looking for is called "Designing Organic Syntheses" by Stuart Warren.

http://www.amazon.com/Designing-Organic-Syntheses-Programmed-Introduction/dp/0471996122
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: nj_bartel on April 02, 2008, 02:20:10 PM
Does anyone have experience with John McMurry's Organic Chemistry 7th Ed. (https://www.chemicalforums.com/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fecx.images-amazon.com%2Fimages%2FI%2F51hUHAyyv8L._SS500_.jpg&hash=19bfa32d3b312c938603662b0dcb716c)?  What do you think of it?  I'll be using that next semester.  Is the study guide associated with the text worth ordering?

Thanks,
Nick

Edit: Sorry for the large image; not sure how to make it smaller.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: chrisbb on April 02, 2008, 06:15:52 PM
im using that book right now.
DEFF. get the SSM ASAP to help with the questions. Its good explanation and has easy to understand concepts. I've been using it for a year now, and its pretty good. Its the first orgy. chem book i've used so really dont have anything to compare it to...
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Arkcon on April 09, 2008, 06:11:18 PM
I've recently picked up The Organic Chem Lab Survival Manual, by James W. Zubrick.  Lots of quick and dirty explanations for techniques for complete beginners, wish I had this back in the day.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: agrobert on April 18, 2008, 11:34:47 AM
I've recently picked up The Organic Chem Lab Survival Manual, by James W. Zubrick.  Lots of quick and dirty explanations for techniques for complete beginners, wish I had this back in the day.

Agreed this is a useful book.  Some people enjoy the humorous tone but I find it irritating.  Besides that the information is readily available and to the point.  Good call Arkcon.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: venkatjohnny on April 21, 2008, 07:38:32 AM
For Undergraduates & Graduates

MODERN ORGANIC SYNTHESIS -  Normon & Coxon

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY - Paul Yukayama Bruice

Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: harini_5 on May 01, 2008, 11:15:35 AM
I am an undergraduate student. Basically for organic I prefer IL. FINAR and MORRISON and BOYD.Any comments???
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: venkatjohnny on May 02, 2008, 02:44:16 AM
Hi Harini,
I.L.Finar is like Bruce, u can follow that. But compared to Morrison& Boyd, i think Organic chemistry (vol I , volII) by Roger Maccomber can help u better for undergraduate topics. K have a nice time :)
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Quietus on June 02, 2008, 03:31:56 PM
Greetings! I graduated H.S. in 2001 and have been working ever since, but a growing general dissatisfaction with the workforce opportunities of the un-educated has led me to re-apply to college. I will be starting a Biochem major at the undergraduate level this fall, and plan to be done in three years (applying for graduate and/or medical school after second year).

I have always been quick to grasp new concepts, and have taken a several night classes at the freshman level (General Biology/College Algebra/English Comp/Critical Thinking to name a few). So far, I'm doing very well and loving it. However, for someone who didn't even take Chemistry at the H.S. level, I imagine that I don't fully understand what I'm myself getting into.

I'm looking for some reading material that will give me a good basis of understanding before I throw myself to the wolves. As I don't feel like forking over several hundred dollars for new textbooks that my school might stop using before my classes begin, are there any older versions that I might be able to get cheap used copies of that come with recommendations for a newcomer to the field? Should I skip the 10 pound books and just grab the cliff notes versions?

Any advice would be appreciated, I'm open minded and very eager to learn!
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: nj_bartel on June 02, 2008, 06:50:16 PM
I'd suggest a high school chem book, but it may cost a little over 100 bucks.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Quietus on June 03, 2008, 10:24:10 AM
I'd suggest a high school chem book, but it may cost a little over 100 bucks.

I don't think I need anything that basic, I pick things up pretty quickly.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: JGK on October 02, 2008, 02:17:54 PM
I can reccommend Morrison & Boyd (https://www.chemicalforums.com/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fbp3.blogger.com%2F_gXwcunZCrRI%2FSIPohEdWcEI%2FAAAAAAAAAUY%2FL7Ue3KWoDLc%2Fs200%2F51TKDMXQB3L.jpg&hash=51245736ec82ed12dbd706ae5d6e6bda)
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: BlowUpEverything on November 26, 2008, 03:31:28 PM
I'm an undergrad with a fairly good background in chemistry planning on majoring in synthetic organic chemistry.  I'm looking for a book I can read before getting involved with an organic research group at my school this coming summer that will help with reaction mechanisms and synthetic techniques.  Just in a couple days of looking around I've found:

Strategic Applications of Named Reactions in Organic Synthesis
 by Barbara Czako and Laszlo Kurti

Classics in Total Synthesis
 by K. C. Nicolaou

Anyone have something to say about either of these texts?  I've also considered March's Advanced Organic Chemistry...  I did a summer intensive o-chem class that used Essential Organic Chemistry by Bruice.  That text was pretty good for a quick and dirty overview of essential functional groups, first year reactions and mechanisms, and a little bit of pharmacology / biochem.  Currently I'm reading independently out of Morrison and Boyd which I've found to be a great text.

   
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: kiwi on December 03, 2008, 04:51:05 AM
Strategic applications is my all time favourite named reaction book. I can't recommend it highly enough for the working chemist, its choice of reactions is far beyond most other books of its type, and the coverage for each reaction is deep, with discovery, mechanism and applications all in a two page spread, linked back to good literature refs. Strat. Apps, along with March (Advanced Organic Chemistry) and Greene and Wutts (Protective Groups in Organic Synthesis) is never far from reach.

These texts are pretty serious stuff, if you end up doing synth org you'll certainly use them. They assume a lot of background knowledge, which might make them hard to get into. Have a look at Clayden etal (Organic Chemistry) if you find the transition a bit daunting, thats a good book for bridging onto more advanced stuff.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: nj_bartel on December 04, 2008, 01:13:32 AM
I've recently picked up The Organic Chem Lab Survival Manual, by James W. Zubrick.  Lots of quick and dirty explanations for techniques for complete beginners, wish I had this back in the day.

Just picked up a copy for $0.46 + shipping.   ;D  Love amazon.com.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Vidya on December 24, 2008, 12:17:28 AM
Best books to understand organic I and Organic II are
Morrison And Boyd
John McMurry
Most of my students are very satisfied and learning well .These books are also good for learning basics of spectroscopy like NMR ,IR UV and MS.
Here is a link for a virtual book
http://www.cem.msu.edu/~reusch/VirtualText/intro1.htm
But I advise you strongly to pick up one best book and dont get mixed up with many.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Doom91 on February 15, 2009, 11:46:31 AM
By the way how do u rate the organic chemistry book written by Mcmurry
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: nj_bartel on February 15, 2009, 02:37:23 PM
I think McMurry's organic book is fantastic - very readable (as far as textbooks go) and easy to learn from.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Doom91 on February 15, 2009, 10:29:15 PM
however i think that the topics are too segregated and do not show the linkages btw the topics i prefer textbooks that provide an amalgation of chemistry concepts(integration of the topics)
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Vidya on February 15, 2009, 11:40:49 PM
I think McMurry's book is good in understanding concepts and applying them on questions .It is good for a quick review during examinations also.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Doom91 on February 16, 2009, 12:38:18 AM
however if u compare Mcmurry and Carey ,i think Carey offers better explanation for chemistry concepts
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Doom91 on February 16, 2009, 09:47:24 AM
how about L.G Wade Organic Chemistry textbook
Juz give comments on it
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Doom91 on February 16, 2009, 10:50:13 AM
Does anyone know of any website that sells an array of 2nd hand used textbooks?like L.G Wade, Brown Foote,march
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Vidya on February 16, 2009, 11:22:42 AM
Hi
I did many problems  with my students and personally liked those problems.But to be very honest I am more into Morrison Boyd , Mcmurry Vogel's practical book of organic chemistry.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: mary33 on February 20, 2009, 01:32:26 AM
John McMurry - Organic Chemistry
 :) (http://"http://onemilliontomy.webs.com") :) (http://"http://onemilliontomy.webs.com")
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Telamond on February 25, 2009, 08:30:16 AM
For the second part of the course I'm taking, the teacher recommended this following book:

L.D. Field, S. Sternhell, J.R. Kalman: Organic Structures from Spectra, Third edition (Wiley, 2002)

But it's mainly just a lot of spectras and very little theory behind the spectroscopy methods for:
-UV/VIS
-IR
-1H-NMR
-13C-NMR
-Masspectrometry

I was wondering if anyone has any book recommendation for these methods?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Vidya on February 25, 2009, 08:55:40 AM

http://www.chem.ucla.edu/~webspectra/
This site is really good to learn and practice problems on NMR/IR
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: gfunk on April 05, 2009, 05:23:16 AM
I think the Clayden book is great, as well as March's and Smith's.  Other books that I have used or currently use that I think are great are:

Klein: Organic Chemistry II as a Second Language -- I used this in Intro Organic.  I thought my textbook, as informative as it is, was too verbose.  This helps you understand the "organic chemistry mindset" and is compact and easy to read.
(https://www.chemicalforums.com/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fhome.cc.umanitoba.ca%2F%7Eumstella%2Fforum%2Fseco.jpg&hash=2d748e362ffa46b9ace0302cd2e2d162)


Wyatt and Warren: Organic Synthesis - Strategy and Control -- I use this as a reference for modern reactions, new twists on old reactions, asymmetric stuff, etc.
(https://www.chemicalforums.com/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fhome.cc.umanitoba.ca%2F%7Eumstella%2Fforum%2Fstrat.jpg&hash=c5f39c849661e6436d872c599fdba642)


Wyatt and Warren: Organic Synthesis - The Disconnection Approach -- Great for learning the art/science of retrosynthesis, making strategic disconnects, etc.
(https://www.chemicalforums.com/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fhome.cc.umanitoba.ca%2F%7Eumstella%2Fforum%2Fdisc.jpg&hash=3cb2bd1f247b3baff8b269d1c1595a49)


Kurti: Strategic Applications of Named Reactions -- A must have, goes through many named reactions, what they are, and where they've been used.  Chicks also dig guys who can rattle off a bunch of named reactions :).
(https://www.chemicalforums.com/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fhome.cc.umanitoba.ca%2F%7Eumstella%2Fforum%2Fname.jpg&hash=bbdcb172f82d52b99186ddb56975a6f8)


Kocienski: Protecting Groups -- Handy to know how to protect and deprotect what, in what conditions, reactivity, and examples of use.  Protection is serious stuff y'know!
(https://www.chemicalforums.com/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fhome.cc.umanitoba.ca%2F%7Eumstella%2Fforum%2Fprot.jpg&hash=409093461e2c9b3ac266385c616e0c4a)


Nicolau: Molecules that Changed the World -- A good bedtime story detailing a bunch of natural products, their discovery, total synthesis, etc.
(https://www.chemicalforums.com/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fhome.cc.umanitoba.ca%2F%7Eumstella%2Fforum%2Fnico.gif&hash=ebc98375f98f240d81b6f9b687c0a46e)
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Berge472 on June 01, 2009, 01:51:01 AM
im self taught so far and have been primarily using John McMurry's Organic Chemistry (7th edition)

i think this book is very good to learn from. my plan going into it was to get an mcat study guide and go through that first. i didnt understand half of what i was reading, but it gave me a good idea of what to focus on when i switched to the texbook. sort of a read the questions first then the passage later approach.

i also reference other books when i get stuck. Organic synthesis: strategy and control is a good one for that
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: rabidshark on July 25, 2009, 11:08:57 AM
I gotta recommend Fessenden and Fessenden 6th Edition. It reads way easier than most organic books I've read. That, and the professor teaching the class also happened to co-author it, which may make me biased.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: yangzhouwang on August 20, 2009, 03:33:33 AM
we are using Wade's Organic, 5th Edition. We all like this book, but we found some mistakes about names of polysubstituted cycloalkane(trans/cis---R/S).
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: orgoclear on August 22, 2009, 07:26:24 AM
I am using a book written by Solomons and Fryhle. Is that good? Or should I switch over to Carey or Wade?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: hanhan0630 on August 25, 2009, 07:08:26 AM
perfect reference book.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: jj74 on September 04, 2009, 04:44:40 AM
I found these good:
Bruice, Clayden and Carey (Advanced)

For synthesis:
Organic Synthesis - The Disconnection Approach - Warren
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: porphyrin on September 06, 2009, 05:30:50 PM
When I studied Organic Chemistry I used the following textbooks.
 -Organic Chemistry - Carey (I thought Carey to be a fantastic Orgo text, but the text did not elucidate spectroscopy in a logical fashion)

-Organic Chemistry - Wade (this text had mediocre writing but fantastic illustrations which assisted in understanding key concepts such as stereoisomerism, peptide structure and biological molecules)

For Synthesis I would recommend Carey's Advanced Organic Chemistry: Reactions and Synthesis - The text is a two volume set which includes Structure and Mechanistic Chemistry (Book A) and Reactions and Synthesis (Book B). Both are a fantastic resource to utilize when studying or working in the lab.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: weiweishen on September 16, 2009, 09:41:25 PM
I think the "preparative organic chemistry" is a very good resource for set a organic synthesis lab
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Beatle on September 21, 2009, 09:22:54 PM
Many goood books, Standouts for I

Org Chem intermediate Text by Robert V Hoffman
Clayden
daley and daley, ochem for free.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: a student on September 22, 2009, 12:08:09 PM
I need to learn 2D NMR. can you tell me is there any book to help me to learn it in a simple way.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: dominis on October 03, 2009, 06:47:22 AM
Hi everyone
I am looking the book about electronic spectroscopy?? I want especially spectra UV-VIS.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: renge ishyo on October 03, 2009, 04:29:38 PM
I need to learn 2D NMR. can you tell me is there any book to help me to learn it in a simple way.

Silverstein's "Spectrometric Identification of Organic Compounds" is a good introductory book. It covers many methods of 1D and 2D NMR in a way which doesn't totally overwhelm you with theory.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: srihari on November 09, 2009, 05:05:46 AM
You can use Daley & Daley Organic Chemistry

it's free, you just have to register - http://www.ochem4free.info/?q=node/1

-Serena

But is it sufficient it isn't exhaustive is it ??
any other free books online ??
please guide me thank you .
Regards,
Srihari.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: OrganicSynthesis on December 27, 2009, 12:45:17 PM
I use McMurry, Organic Chemistry, like a lot of other people.

It is my first and only organic chemistry text and was good enough to make me say that organic chemistry is my favourite chemistry. I'm in highschool, however, so I may be too young to put my foot down until I experience the actual course, as well as other chemistry courses.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: arom58 on January 15, 2010, 11:22:38 PM
Hey folks,
For some nostalgic reasons I am in desperate need of Allinger Organic Chemistry ebook/pdf in English. The Spanish version is out there to download but is of no use for me. PLEASE HELP :'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'(
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: arom58 on January 16, 2010, 03:31:46 PM
Wow, what a nice place to be: Tell how you feel and ask for people's help and get a -ve mole snakes, just freaking wonderful.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Synth on January 30, 2010, 09:40:22 AM
I second must haves for reference:

Greene's Book on Protecting Groups
Czako and Kurti's Named Reaction Book
Dougherty and Anslyn's Modern Physical Organic
March's Advanced Organic Chemistry

I also think that fun reads are

Fleming's Molecular Orbitals and Organic Chemical Reactions
Grossman's Art of Writing Reasonable Organic Reaction Mechanisms
Corey's The Logic oc Chemical Synthesis
Nicolaou's Classics in Total Synthesis

A good solid introductory textbook that I would recommend would be

Loudon's Organic Chemistry text. Very basic, very solid.

Some other good references, that aren't must haves (at least not yet! for me.) are
Stereochemistry of Organic Compounds by Eliel
Transition Metals in the Synthesis of Complex Organic Molecules by Hegedus
Comprehensive Organic Transformations by Larock
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: salleebrowne on February 16, 2010, 10:40:04 PM
I hae found the book "Pushing Electrons" by Daniel Weeks to be a God send. While not a text book, it guides the organic chemistry student through the processes of pushing electrons and understanding resonance. It was a life-saer for me! :)
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Shikimic on February 27, 2010, 10:55:48 PM
For Undergraduate Students

(https://www.chemicalforums.com/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Frcm-images.amazon.com%2Fimages%2FP%2F0198503466.01._SCTHUMBZZZ_.jpg&hash=2fabee8b96a3b9629f119d4d7e13b56a)   
Title: Organic Chemistry
Author: Nick Greeves
Description: The Clayden book is my favorite.  It's maybe a little advanced for someone encountering organic chem for the first time, but it's awesome nonetheless.
 (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0198503466/thechemicalfo-20/104-3671508-3002355?%5Fencoding=UTF8&camp=1789&link%5Fcode=xm2)
I fully agree that this is a great textbook. It's very thorough on mechanisms and gives plenty of detail to keep you satisfied. Rarely will you go "Why did that happen? Huh?" because this book is really that great at explaining. The detail might scare some people new to organic though; this was a recommended text for second yr organic at my uni.

Does anyone have experience with John McMurry's Organic Chemistry 7th Ed.?  What do you think of it?  I'll be using that next semester.  Is the study guide associated with the text worth ordering?
I refer to this one a fair bit. It's very reader friendly and covers a range of organic topics. Not quite as detailed as Clayden but great for second year anyway. I borrowed out the study guide and I find it pretty useful as it provides good detailed answers to chapter problems.
 
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: dunno260 on March 05, 2010, 07:24:28 AM
For graduate level synthesis I can't recommend Zweifel and Nantz's Modern Organic Synthesis.  Very readable with very good choices of reactions and reaction sequences that are seen in organic synthesis.  IMO its vastly superior to Carey and Sundberg pt B.  Won't find much in depth discussion on any one reaction, but just enough to cover the synthetic utility of each reaction.  http://www.amazon.com/Modern-Organic-Synthesis-George-Zweifel/dp/0716772663/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1267791526&sr=1-1 (http://www.amazon.com/Modern-Organic-Synthesis-George-Zweifel/dp/0716772663/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1267791526&sr=1-1)

I have Carey and Sundberg and March and this is the first book I grab unless its a name reaction in Kurti/Czako.

I also make heavy use of Modern Organic Synthesis in the Laboratory by Li, Limberakis, and Pflum.  Sort of like Vogel, but with much more relevant procedures for the common reactions. 
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: renge ishyo on March 05, 2010, 03:03:43 PM
Quote
how about L.G Wade Organic Chemistry textbook
Juz give comments on it

I've read the Organic Chemistry text by L.G. Wade (6th edition) cover to cover, and it is a very good text. Very clear and easy to read for the most part. The second half of the book contains a few minor errors in places, but by then you pretty much know what is going on, so it doesn't detract too much. The best thing about the book is its "mechanism" boxes. All the major mechanisms in the book are separated out from the rest of the text into a list of mechanisms and "key mechanisms" (which the author believes are the most important ones) in the table of contents. So if you want to use the book as a reference after reading it once through, you can just jump to these boxes to get a refresher without having to dig for the mechanisms in the various chapters. That feature alone, I like very much. I haven't seen the 7th edition at all, so I can't comment on it.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Phenyl Ethilamine on March 15, 2010, 01:53:49 PM
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Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: quantumpanda on March 20, 2010, 12:36:01 AM
After reading through this thread and seeing the many opinions on Carey and Sundberg, I have a question: dryness/writing style aside, is Carey and Sundberg a good and comprehensive adv. organic text? Are there any specific gaps in its coverage? Essentially, if I work through part A and B cover-to-cover, will I have learned the equivalent of a typical undergraduate "Advanced Org. Chem" class?

I have Carey and Sundberg right now, and don't want to buy another book (poor college student!) I don't have room in my schedule for Advanced Organic at the moment, but I really want to learn the material and understand more of the literature! So any information would be appreciated.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: StarvinMarvin on April 09, 2010, 04:25:12 PM
Guys, I need your take on this subject.

I'm thinking of upgrading my personal library by a solid reference work on name reactions. I've been thinking about buying any of those three positions:

1) B. Mundy, M. Ellerd, F. Favaloro "Name reactions and reagents in organic synthesis"
2) L. Kurti, B. Czako "Strategic applications of named reactions in organic synthesis"
3) J. Li "Name reactions: a collection of detailed mechanisms".

Since this position would serve me mostly as a reference material to primary publications, but also as a revision tool, several factors are of strategic importance when it comes to choosing the book:
- amount and variety of references to primary publications
- clarity of mechanisms drawn
- spectrum of the subject covered (how many name reactions and reagents are there in the book, applications in total synthesis, examples, variations etc.)

Price-wise all three of those books cost about the same amount of money, but I can't decide which one to buy. My library has only the first position which I already held in my hands, but if you have any of those books I would be glad if you could share some thoughts about them which could help me make my decision. As I am on a budget (Ph.D students have it tough) I can only afford one of those books. So, I'm looking fora position that is the most comprehensive of all.

I know that Z. Wang is publishing a 4 volume set on name reactions this year and that book would be THE MOST comprehensive book of all, but according to Wiley the price of that beauty would be around 400 pounds (which is way out of my range).

So' I think I'm down to those three possibilities. Please let me know, which one would be the best choice in your opinion.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: asdaf7477 on April 09, 2010, 06:26:39 PM
Clayden Greeves and Warren Organic Chemistry is a godsend!
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Jorriss on April 11, 2010, 08:34:49 PM
I haven't taken an organic chemistry class so I don't have a complete, rigorous approach to evaluating these books, but I found Solomons good from what I read of it. I thought the authors were arrogant but their approach to showing mechanisms is very good.

The organic chemistry as a second language books are also good, but the second one is a lot better.

I do highly recommend both, but it's also all I've used heavily.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: MissPhosgene on May 03, 2010, 08:36:02 PM
My votes go with The Classics in Total Synthesis volumes 1 and 2 (Nicolaou), Advanced Organic Chemistry Part B (Carey & Sundberg), and The Way of Synthesis (Reed).

Thumbs down to The Logic Of Chemical Synthesis (Corey).
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Jorriss on June 01, 2010, 04:01:24 PM
I was using McMurry a few days ago and I thought it had really solid end of the chapter problems. I didn't actually go through the chapters themselves but the problems were solid - much, much better than Solomons.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: SVXX on June 15, 2010, 07:08:59 AM
What about Solomons and Fryhle Organic Chemistry(Wiley)? It's pretty good for beginners and advanced readers alike...atleast how I found it!
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: a student on June 16, 2010, 03:47:15 AM
Does anyone know of any website that sells an array of 2nd hand used textbooks?like L.G Wade, Brown Foote,march

and also old versions of some softwares like Gaussian, matlab and ... :-\
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Jorriss on July 01, 2010, 01:00:44 AM
Can anyone offer opinions on the following texts?

Anslyn, Physical Organic Chemistry.

 or

Vollhardt, Organic Chemistry.

Thank you




Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Jorriss on July 04, 2010, 10:10:52 PM
I'm double posting but this is about something totally different.


I bought the Intro organic book by warren, clayden, greeves and wothers and it comes an astonishing amount of material. It's well formatted and is well presented.

But am I the only one who thinks it's riddled with errors?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: helenn on July 26, 2010, 05:27:31 AM
I don't know why you'd ask that question in this thread, but THF is tetrahydrofuran.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: vehans on November 11, 2010, 10:22:13 PM
I have taken the full organic chem courses (two courses in community college) offered for transferring to a university with a chem major. I'm fairly good at the subject and enjoy it too much lol. I've recently ordered the two part Carey & Richard books, now i want to learn independently (as much as I can) from them; does anyone remember/know which chapters/parts of the book they went over in university?


Thank you!
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: MissPhosgene on November 26, 2010, 07:49:54 PM
I have taken the full organic chem courses (two courses in community college) offered for transferring to a university with a chem major. I'm fairly good at the subject and enjoy it too much lol. I've recently ordered the two part Carey & Richard books, now i want to learn independently (as much as I can) from them; does anyone remember/know which chapters/parts of the book they went over in university?


Thank you!

Read all the chapters
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Jorriss on November 28, 2010, 04:24:47 PM
I have taken the full organic chem courses (two courses in community college) offered for transferring to a university with a chem major. I'm fairly good at the subject and enjoy it too much lol. I've recently ordered the two part Carey & Richard books, now i want to learn independently (as much as I can) from them; does anyone remember/know which chapters/parts of the book they went over in university?


Thank you!
Do you also have Grossman's, The Art of Writing Reasonable Organic Reaction Mechanisms? That's a super book too.

As for Carey/Sundberg, just do what you like. If you want to learn about the structure and mechanism of nucleophilic substitution, check out chapter 4 of volume A, if you want to learn synthetic methods of the carbonyl group, check out that chapter in volume B. It's really upto you, you won't hurt yourself by jumping around.

Although, for volume A, I would go over chapters 1-3 no matter what because they a lot of foundational physical organic chemistry.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Excelinthewall on December 04, 2010, 04:49:06 AM
for study organic i use both Brown and Bruice, but I prefer the Bruice because the reaction mechanism is exhibit better. But i have a problem for organic book: none of this have got a resolution for the problem. Someone know  a good exercise book?

i'm so sorry for my bad english and thanks everyone for the help.

bye bye
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: orgopete on December 04, 2010, 11:01:36 AM
If you are already using Paula Bruice and what to practice reaction mechanisms, then I would like to suggest my book, A Guide to Organic Chemistry Mechanisms (http://www.curvedarrowpress.com/). I concede that it is a bit avant garde in some respects, but if all you wish to know is how do reactions take place, it does a very good job of that. The mechanisms are repeated at four levels. The first requires adding the curved arrow, the second every other structure is missing, and the third is similar to problems in an organic chemistry text. Then a complete solution is also provided. I guarantee you can do the problems. Because the problems are repeated at increasing levels of difficulty, you can learn complete mechanisms. There is a sampler page here (http://www.curvedarrowpress.com/agocm/inside/sampler/sampler.html).
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: vehans on December 09, 2010, 03:44:24 AM
Thanks for the aid Jorriss, I appreciate it!
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: AWK on December 09, 2010, 05:25:48 AM
http://www.alibris.com/search/books/qwork/4887071/used/Organic%20Chemistry
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: MissPhosgene on December 09, 2010, 09:00:13 PM
Can anyone offer opinions on the following texts?

Anslyn, Physical Organic Chemistry.

 or

Vollhardt, Organic Chemistry.

Thank you






The Anslyn book is one of my all time favorite reads. Don't know about Vollhardt.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Jorriss on December 21, 2010, 11:49:44 PM
Can anyone offer opinions on the following texts?

Anslyn, Physical Organic Chemistry.

 or

Vollhardt, Organic Chemistry.

Thank you






The Anslyn book is one of my all time favorite reads. Don't know about Vollhardt.
Vollhardt is an introductory book and not a great at that, imo. It's basically the same as Solomons but slightly less information as I recall, but I am not certain. And it is no where near as good as Solomons, Wothers, Smothers, etc, etc.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: LittleNovice on February 08, 2011, 02:10:38 AM
Does anyone know of some good textbooks to study organic synthesis of natural products (i.e. polyketides) or practice synthetic pathways?

I've been using Solomons up till now and it doesn't do an in-depth enough job on the mechanisms/reactions involved in the natural and synthetic pathways to synthesize natural products.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Diels_Alder on March 03, 2011, 03:43:47 PM
Hi,

This is my first post in the forum and I would like to ask something about an Spectroscopy book.

I´m interested in buying "Introduction to Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy" from Kulthop, Daly and Wiberley (Academic Press) after reading the third edition (1990) of the book. Do you know what are the differences  between the Third and the second edition (1975)? Does the second edition lack interesting issues from the newest one?

Thanks in advance.


Does anyone know of some good textbooks to study organic synthesis of natural products (i.e. polyketides) or practice synthetic pathways?

I've been using Solomons up till now and it doesn't do an in-depth enough job on the mechanisms/reactions involved in the natural and synthetic pathways to synthesize natural products.

I´m not an expert on that topic but I can recommend you "Natural Products" ( J. Mann, S. Davidson, J. Hobbs, D. Banthorpe, J. H). The book is quite detailed in terms of mechanisms in my opinion and maybe suits you.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: physicianwebsites on April 12, 2011, 01:41:50 PM
nother good one is "Structure Determination of Organic Compounds" by Pretsh, Buhlmann, and Affolter.  It doesn't have much theory of spectroscopy, but it has tons of reference data, such as where you would expect the 13C signals of an aromatic ring with a CF3 substituent (i.e., trifluorotoluene) and what all the JC-F coupling constants are.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Åke on May 27, 2011, 04:57:21 PM
The two volume set by Carey and Sundberg is apparently very popular but I found it really boring. Clayden/Greeves/Warren/Wolters is an excellent book to start off with and it's exciting too. More than a decade has passed since it has first been published and it's still the best.

// VH
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: sparta on September 23, 2011, 09:57:01 AM
hi jameel plz name the best book for spectroscopy problems IR NMR C13 H1nmr
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Alexpride on September 28, 2011, 11:42:05 PM
 ???

I'm taking organic chemistry 1 for undergrad.  The professor is probably one of the most intelligent professors I ever had.  But he is difficult to follow, and the topics discussed in class aren't really in a sort of order out of a textbook.

The required textbook by the university is the solomon's Organic Chemistry 10th edition.   I really dislike this textbook and the solutions manual as well; after using the both for a 1 1/2 month, I learned that the professor isn't using it himself and that he also dislikes it.  Not only that, the topics in the class aren't in the same order as in the book.  


Therefore I bought others.  Here is a list of what I have now.
Guides:
1.  Klein's Organic Chemistry ASL.  (really helped but not for everything, and especially will not for future topics).
2.  Instant Notes in Organic Chemistry.  (haven't used it much)

Textbooks and solutions manual.
1. Solomons 10th Edition.  (dislike)
2. Carey 6th Edition.   (fine, but not for all topics in class)
3. Morrison 5th.  (just received)

Since I'm having hard time finding the topics in the textbooks, are there any other guides or textbooks that I should look into?
  
The professor mentioned Bruice and Wade; would these be any different/better?

I have noticed that the professor isn't really using a functional group approach, but still not very much a mechanical approach as well.

What would be a good text or guide for finding topics discussed in class?

Would any of the following be beneficial?
The Nuts and Bolts of Organic Chemistry: A Student's Guide to Success
The Art of Writing Reasonable Organic Reaction Mechanisms
Vogel's Textbook of Practical Organic Chemistry
Pushing Electrons: A Guide for Students of Organic Chemistry

Thanks in advance!

Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: orgopete on September 29, 2011, 04:37:05 PM
@Alexpride
Learning (organic) chemistry can be a challenge for students (and teachers). I took over a class using Solomons and Fryhle, a functional group based book. It seemed so 1960 to me. I switched to Bruice. This was in tune with my teaching. I changed to Brown and Foote seeking to lighten the load when the mechanisms become long and there was little reprieve if you really didn't know mechanisms. Then I went back to Bruice. We used the ACS organic exam to evaluate progress.

My summary. The lower quartile did better with Bruice than with a functional group based book. I reason that mechanism based books may give a better rationale for retention. Functional groups based books may leave students confused as to what should happen in reactions, especially if the student adage of "if confused or in doubt, memorize". (Since I emphasized mechanisms, I was generally disheartened when I saw students using flash cards as these students generally were not top performers, see student adage.)

I liked and disliked different books for what I would consider frivolous reasons. Really, old chemistry, is that a reason? Bruice had some discussion I liked in its solution manual. Many like Wade, but I couldn't get what he was try to say? Why were some reactions introduced when they were? What was the point? It seemed to jump around. I liked the more orderly approach of Paula Bruice.

I haven't seen a 'guide' that I liked. My analogy. If you wanted to learn a language, a guide that said it could teach you French with 200 or 2000 words might seem appealing, especially if it takes at least 5000 words. In the end, would you be fluent? Most of the guides I have looked at simply cut out material. It will be simpler. So is French is you limit your vocabulary.

My book was written generally around Bruice. I have learned that it also has a flaw. It is the flaw noted by Alexpride. I have discovered that even though I have a fairly extensive index and cross reference to reactions, many students cannot recognize an example if it is not THE example in their book even if it is the same mechanism. (I need to find professors that would like to use my book in their class and for me to adapt it to their textbook. Then students would be reassured that they are learning the exact example taught in their class.)

In the end, I don't think it is about the book at all. It is about how our brains work. If things make logical sense, we can remember them. That is why it is more difficult to memorize the Gettysburg address if with Chinese characters, for example. Mechanisms are a strategy to make sense of reactions. Each and every step should follow a rational path leading to a final result. That should be the objective in writing mechanisms. Memorizing can be shorter and faster, but in the end, if you are like most students, you will come to a point at which you will ask, is this reagent an oxidant or reductant (or something like that)?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Alexpride on September 30, 2011, 08:50:35 AM
Thanks for your reply!

I'm looking at your books now and I see different ones, a workbook and two guides; how are the guides different from one another?  Which one would you recommend for first semester?

Also, you mentioned that you used Bruice and Wade?  Have used any others that had the Mechanism approach?  ex....Hornback? Clayden?

Finally did you see differences between an older edition to a new one?

Thanks!!!
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: orgopete on September 30, 2011, 10:58:46 AM
@Alexpride
I agree that there are other mechanism based books. However, I am not as familiar with either to the level one achieves by using them in class. When you use them in class, you begin to get a sense of how they think students are to learn. I had a definite idea of how I thought students should learn. I thought more like a coach, you practice what you want to use in the game. I also avoided testing anything we didn't practice.

Re: differences in editions
This is simply my opinion on the economics of publishing. The chemistry used upon which the books are based has not changed and there is little (not no) new chemistry demanding inclusion. If teachers continued to use the same edition of a textbook, the used market would grow and author and publisher profit would diminish. There are a larger number of textbooks now than when I took organic chemistry. This reflects on the economics of publishing.

In the original post that I was answering, "Since I'm having hard time finding the topics in the textbooks…" In my opinion, this is one of the changes that I think is part of the new edition design. Adding more problems, adding chapters, etc., all result in changing the assignments. This is all part of a strategy to encourage adoption of a new edition.

Re: my books
My books are ancillaries. They are meant to supplement textbooks. They are also fairly short. The structure of the two workbooks (or the workbook with two versions) prevents including comments with the reactions. I added comments in an appendix. The handbook was written to fulfill a request by students who wanted something they could adopt to their problem, but did not want to practice writing the steps. This format allowed me to include the appendix notes into the reactions. As I did this fairly quickly, even I cannot give this book much praise. It does succeed in explaining several subjects, especially if my thinking may provide an alternate explanation to what you may find in a textbook.

Differences: The two versions differ in that one uses the pre-bonds and the other does not. You can read about this on my website, http://www.curvedarrowpress.com. My teaching philosophy was if our brains are pattern matching machines, then consistency improved learning and inconsistency interfered. I introduced pre-bonds (dashed lines where bonds will form) so all curved arrows were used unambiguously and consistently. Because pre-bonds are not part of all textbooks, I rewrote a version in which I removed all pre-bonds and used the conventional curved arrows. I have never used this book. I expect that I will abandon this version when the books are refreshed. (I have other ideas to help with adoption.)

I suggest getting the blue book. You can write your curved arrows any way you wish. No one will be looking over your shoulder. The most important thing is to understand which atoms become joined and where the electrons come from. The curved arrows are devices that help you to understand this. If you understand reactions, you can write out a mechanism by only writing the intermediates and skipping curved arrows completely. If you understand this, then you will understand that students who have used the pre-bonds can easily adjust to the other notation.

Other information: about curved arrows, http://www.curvedarrowpress.com/chem/curvedarrowsurvey/curvedarrowsurvey.html

Print out and do (I guarantee you can do them), Minisampler (http://www.curvedarrowpress.com/agocm/inside/sampler/sampler.html)
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Vidya on November 30, 2011, 08:23:43 PM
how about L.G Wade Organic Chemistry textbook
Juz give comments on it

I used this book this also and is really a good book to start organic chemistry .There are plenty of problems to work on also.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: devvaibhav on December 14, 2011, 08:21:17 AM
Hi
I am a 11Th grade student and preparing for IITJEE. I am having problems in drawing resonating structures and lone pairs(i know that is dumb)..I searched for this and came to know about this book "Pushing Electrons: A Guide for Students of Organic Chemistry " By "Daniel P. Weeks". I didn't find much reviews about this book. By the way i already have "Organic Chemistry 9Th By " T.W. Graham Solomons and Craig B. Fryhle".
Should i purchase this book? Is there any website where i can see the preview of this book? Thanks and awaiting for reply..
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Mustafa28 on December 18, 2011, 05:30:40 AM
Ask, i'll give you an easy 5 step explanation that will help you get very comfortable with drawing resonance structures.

It's one of the most poorly explained concepts and it can be tricky to get the hang of it based on the usual textbook explanations.

Edit by Borek: original proposition was against the site spirit.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Fluorine on December 20, 2011, 03:51:57 AM
I'm looking for a book that is beyond the scope organic chemistry I and II and focused on synthesis, mechanism, and such topics. I have 'March's Advanced' which is wonderful though is clearly written more so as a reference/support. I have been suggested Electron Flow in Organic Chemistry (Scudder) and Advanced Organic Chemistry: Part B (Carey/Sundberg) as post-OChem reading for more in-depth understanding of covered topics.

In short, I want to learn more-advanced reactions, their mechanisms, limitations, and so forth that organic I/II did not cover (eg. coupling, rearrangements, etc.). Any recommendations of where/how to start?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: icho2013 on December 28, 2011, 03:34:23 AM
i think Jonathan Clayden : organic chemistry  is the best. :D
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: BetaAmyloid on January 01, 2012, 02:36:50 AM
Howdy.

I had a question for you guys about textbooks, most likely a lab book. I wanted to know - for organic chemistry/synthesis - if there is a book available that shows multitudes of reactions and how they can be arranged in the lab. Something that includes amounts needed (I guess percentages for reagents/solvents), apparatus setup necessary to perform the reaction given, and perhaps the mechanism of the reaction.

I'm assuming this would be a lab book. If you know of a book that is full of reactions that can be performed in the lab, please let me know!

I appreciate your time.

Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Dan on January 01, 2012, 07:29:08 AM
I wanted to know - for organic chemistry/synthesis - if there is a book available that shows multitudes of reactions and how they can be arranged in the lab. Something that includes amounts needed (I guess percentages for reagents/solvents), apparatus setup necessary to perform the reaction given, and perhaps the mechanism of the reaction.

Try Vogel's Practical Organic Synthesis
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Ferrocene on January 01, 2012, 05:19:41 PM


Clayden, G, W and W!! ALWAYS!
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: TVUW on January 08, 2012, 11:57:02 PM
I am looking for a book that covers the steps in developing a synthesis.  For example, one would determine the raw materials, reagents, and initial rxn conditions.  Next, one may want to design experiments to determine the optimum conditions for the synthesis.  Next, one would scale up.  Within these steps there would be rxn monitoring, product purity determination, crystal morphology optimization, etc.  There seems to be many books that cover organic chemistry, analytical chemistry, or solid state characterization, but I have yet to see a guide in practical development.  Any guidance in this matter would be greatly appreciated.  I am having a hard time bringing the pieces together to gain a functional knowledge of the sort.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: pawelmitula on January 18, 2012, 01:45:28 AM
I suggest Morrison&Boyd, also McMurry - this book, especially new verison is very well ilustrated. Always You have to precisously what kind of chemistry You want study, eg. for NMR the best is Silversiten and there are not one book to everything, even for mechanism of reactions there are better books than this two above:)
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: organic blues on January 22, 2012, 12:45:13 PM
Organic Chemistry by John McMurry is a good find too.  :)
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: UpbeatWhiz on February 07, 2012, 10:26:34 PM
Klein's Organic Chemistry as a second language  1 and 2 are amazing and just get right to the point.


Klein also has a textbook that was released as a first edition this year I believe, my school adopted to switch it this year. It is very easy to understand better than my general chem textbook for sure.


I also have a problem solving book which is really helpful, not sure who the author is though as I don't have it on me right now.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: dipesh747 on February 21, 2012, 08:11:45 AM
John Clayden is part of the academic staff at my university. He is brilliant, everyone should buy his book :)
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: w4rlock on March 15, 2012, 11:52:01 AM
Can anyone offer opinions on the following texts?

Anslyn, Physical Organic Chemistry.

 or

Vollhardt, Organic Chemistry.

Thank you






The Anslyn book is one of my all time favorite reads. Don't know about Vollhardt.
Vollhardt is an introductory book and not a great at that, imo. It's basically the same as Solomons but slightly less information as I recall, but I am not certain. And it is no where near as good as Solomons, Wothers, Smothers, etc, etc.

Vollhardt is great for undergrad especially if supplemented by P. Sykes A guidebook to mechanism in organic chemistry... actually I'm surprised that no one else mentioned Syke's guidebook. Yes, it's quite very old but the explanations are great and concise and a big plus is it's a paperback and quite light.

Nowadays I usually use the Carey Sundberg both volumes as a good reference point. March is pretty good but I prefer Carey for explanations and what not.

Vogel is of course an important reference point for practical chem. 
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: KingB5194 on April 21, 2012, 08:05:50 PM
Title: organic chemistry demystified
Author:daniel r bloch
It is very good for highschool chemistry classes
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Rutherford on June 27, 2012, 11:32:21 AM
http://books.google.rs/books/about/Organic_Chemistry.html?id=1t0yfXTguk4C&redir_esc=y
Is this a good practice book for beginners (highschool level)?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: emily12 on August 08, 2012, 12:51:42 AM
http://www.amazon.com/Basic-Skills-Organic-Chemistry-Toolkit/dp/0763707414/ref=cm_lmf_tit_4

Good Organic Chemistry Book
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: zyj on August 11, 2012, 01:30:28 PM
Has anyone read Frank C. Whitmore's Organic Chemistry books? The author seems like a pretty good chemist, but are his books any good?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: 123456789 on August 12, 2012, 10:03:22 AM
Hello, Also about Organic Chem textbooks.

I currently have access to Clayden's Organic chemistry, McMurray 8th edition, David Klein's new organic chemistry textbook and Morrison (Don't really know what edition).

Trying to self study Organic chemistry, (currently 10th grade and my teacher doesn't teach much...) so which one would you recommend that I read (as a beginner)? Which one is easier to understand? From what I know Clayden's is good but rather difficult to understand.

I have the solution book for Clayden and Mcmurray, but not the Klein one. I would suppose it's important that can make references to the answers sometimes.

And my target is to complete maybe 3/4 of the book in 4-6months? (if that's possible...do you think so?)

Thanks lots!
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: sjb on August 12, 2012, 02:39:23 PM
Hello, Also about Organic Chem textbooks.

I currently have access to Clayden's Organic chemistry, McMurray 8th edition, David Klein's new organic chemistry textbook and Morrison (Don't really know what edition).

Trying to self study Organic chemistry, (currently 10th grade and my teacher doesn't teach much...) so which one would you recommend that I read (as a beginner)? Which one is easier to understand? From what I know Clayden's is good but rather difficult to understand.

I have the solution book for Clayden and Mcmurray, but not the Klein one. I would suppose it's important that can make references to the answers sometimes.

And my target is to complete maybe 3/4 of the book in 4-6months? (if that's possible...do you think so?)

Thanks lots!

I am not familiar with Klein, but I think I know what books you mean by the other two. These are more university-level books, so perhaps at Grade 10 they may be a little above your level (no disrespect meant). I'd certainly think that "completing 75% of the book in 4-6 months" might be a little difficult, even if you studied little else - as far as I know Clayden is recommended for years of degree student here, even if it's just as a background reader.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: orgopete on August 13, 2012, 12:55:27 AM

Trying to self study Organic chemistry, (currently 10th grade and my teacher doesn't teach much...) so which one would you recommend that I read (as a beginner)?

… to complete maybe 3/4 of the book in 4-6months? (if that's possible...do you think so?)


In that case, I'd suggest my book, A Guide to Organic Chemistry Mechanisms (http://www.curvedarrowpress.com/). If you are thinking of going through a college text on your own, then begin by skipping that step, well not entirely. Learning organic chemistry has two parts, one is about the static issues of nomenclature, conformation, spectroscopy, etc. Although they can be trying, virtually all students succeed in these topics. The 900 lb gorilla is reactions. This is where I think my book excels. The way it is written, it is easy to succeed. It has its drawbacks as well (contact me, and I'll tell you about them), but it is modestly priced, and you can complete the entire book in one to two months, depending upon your diligence.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: 123456789 on August 13, 2012, 06:24:48 AM

I am not familiar with Klein, but I think I know what books you mean by the other two. These are more university-level books, so perhaps at Grade 10 they may be a little above your level (no disrespect meant). I'd certainly think that "completing 75% of the book in 4-6 months" might be a little difficult, even if you studied little else - as far as I know Clayden is recommended for years of degree student here, even if it's just as a background reader.

In that case, I'd suggest my book, A Guide to Organic Chemistry Mechanisms (http://www.curvedarrowpress.com/). If you are thinking of going through a college text on your own, then begin by skipping that step, well not entirely. Learning organic chemistry has two parts, one is about the static issues of nomenclature, conformation, spectroscopy, etc. Although they can be trying, virtually all students succeed in these topics. The 900 lb gorilla is reactions. This is where I think my book excels. The way it is written, it is easy to succeed. It has its drawbacks as well (contact me, and I'll tell you about them), but it is modestly priced, and you can complete the entire book in one to two months, depending upon your diligence.

Okay, thank you! I think it will be a bit hard to buy your book here, as I don't live in the US (so if i buy it the mailing fee will cost more than the book itself...sorry:( tight budget), but it definitely look like a good book to me! Well shall focus more on that area. Actually it was my friend (who's half a year older) who recommended me all the organic chem books... and she knows like almost everything now... I would say that personally I think they are quite understandable (reading them), as I have a bit of background I think (maybe 3/4 of the A level syllabus-but I don't live in the UK either). Anyways, thanks for all your prompt comments! Greatly appreciated!
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: SamstaUK on September 20, 2012, 11:03:34 AM
What books would people recommend for someone with a general interest in organic chemistry? I'm not studying it, but I enjoy reading about reaction mechanisms and how molecules are synthesised.

Can anyone recommend an organic chemistry book which is interesting to read, but which I could also learn something new?

Thank You
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: kirushanth on September 24, 2012, 02:09:42 PM
Is there any book which contains a few ideas and nice reactions and maybe some very good problems from the olympiads which are normally not covered in the standard textbooks?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Tartarus on October 12, 2012, 07:18:40 PM
We used a book by Maitland Jones. Didn't like it because there were not a lot of problems to practice with.

Then, During the middle of the semester of orgo I, I got a copy of Janice Smith's text and wow! A surplus of problems to toy with. My love for organic chemistry doubled and made orgo II much easier.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: OccamsAftershave on October 15, 2012, 10:52:13 AM
Morrison Boyd

Finar and Boyd

Along with Atkin's for Physical and JDL for Inorganic.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: sussman on October 19, 2012, 02:50:56 AM
I've been looking for a good organic chemistry book. I am trying to self-teach for the time being (chemistry is not my field, but forget that since I need to know organic very well). According to Amazon reviews, Clayden et al. is the best. I borrowed a copy of it from my university library. There weren't enough practice problems, and the content seemed quite tedious and theoretical. I tend to like specific rules and patterns, not trial-and-error guesswork based on qualitative understanding of theories.

So I started looking for other books. I'm thinking about using either Wade, Klein, or Hornback. Any suggestions? Should I give it another shot and buy Clayden et al. because it's the "best"?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: sussman on October 19, 2012, 08:45:06 PM
Never mind. I decided to stick with Clayden. The others are even worse.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Sophia7X on January 02, 2013, 03:27:40 PM
Never mind. I decided to stick with Clayden. The others are even worse.

Really??

Klein's Organic Chemistry is, no doubt, the best textbook (out of any subject!) I have read in my entire life. There is no textbook that can even compare... it is only textbook that my eyes won't glaze over after 20 pages. Wade is alright but Klein's book is, in my opinion, THE model textbook. It makes organic easy to understand. I also love how it has these "conceptual checkpoints" and "Skillbuilders" after every few pages to make sure you get the concept before waiting until the end of the chapter and throwing a bunch of exercises, expecting you to remember everything.

Everyone learning organic chemistry should get Klein's Organic Chemistry
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Borek on January 02, 2013, 05:03:33 PM
Klein's Organic Chemistry is, no doubt, the best textbook (out of any subject!) I have read in my entire life.

Are you aware of the fact different people learn in different ways? There is no "one size fits all" book for any subject. If you like Klein's book - stick to it. Advising others to try is OK as well - but being sure it will work for everyone is not.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: tripsaurabh on January 14, 2013, 08:31:34 AM
I personally believe that PETER SYKES also should have been on this list. It is by far a very good book for reaction mechanism.  :)
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: asd34 on January 16, 2013, 01:46:51 PM
I am searching for static stereochemistry book, or an organic chem. book, where this part well described. Just the basics, mainly chirality types and configurations.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Dan on January 17, 2013, 03:20:20 AM
I am searching for static stereochemistry book, or an organic chem. book, where this part well described. Just the basics, mainly chirality types and configurations.

I recommend: Stereochemistry at a Glance - Eames and Peach (ISBN: 0632053755)
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Silver-Midnight on January 28, 2013, 10:05:14 PM
I was wondering if someone could maybe recommend an O-Chem book for an Undergraduate. (I'm an Undergraduate Chemistry major if that helps any). I really need something that's good at explaining the material, hopefully, very, if not mostly, simplified or at least easy to understand. The textbook that I'm using for the class is John McMurray's 8th Ed. Organic Chemistry.

So far, one the major issues that I'm having is learning the C-13 NMR, H1-NMR, and other spectra. So, something that really explains that well would be helpful.

I hope what I'm asking for makes sense. If it doesn't, I can try to elaborate a little further I suppose. 
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: tomek on January 29, 2013, 02:34:59 AM
Quote
I was wondering if someone could maybe recommend an O-Chem book for an Undergraduate.

I like Clayden's 'Organic Chemistry'. I find it very informative and it explains things well. There's also a good coverage of spectroscopy. Although it's not simplified by any means.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Dan on January 29, 2013, 02:58:03 AM
So far, one the major issues that I'm having is learning the C-13 NMR, H1-NMR, and other spectra. So, something that really explains that well would be helpful.

Try: Harwood and Claridge - Introduction to Organic Spectroscopy. ISBN 0198557555
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Silver-Midnight on February 06, 2013, 09:42:56 AM
Thanks. For both of those suggestions, is there any edition that I should specifically get, or will the latest edition be good?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Dan on February 06, 2013, 10:48:16 AM
It's generally a good idea to get the latest edition of any textbook. The first edition of Clayden & Co is very good though (I actually haven't seen the newer one), so if you're strapped for cash you might save a bit if you get the older one second hand and it should do you just fine.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Alexis7 on February 26, 2013, 01:11:28 AM
Klein is without a doubt the best.

If you want to learn how to do mechanisms, I recommend William Groutas.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: biomiracle on March 25, 2013, 11:17:57 PM
Hello!

Has anyone used Wade or Carey Organic Chemistry? 
Which organic textbook from above makes best pair with Klein's organic Chemistry?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Silver-Midnight on April 10, 2013, 01:45:25 PM
It's generally a good idea to get the latest edition of any textbook. The first edition of Clayden & Co is very good though (I actually haven't seen the newer one), so if you're strapped for cash you might save a bit if you get the older one second hand and it should do you just fine.

Thanks for the suggestion.


I mean I like the textbook that I have (McMurray's); it does explain things pretty well. However, I'm just not grasping the material for some reason. I'm still having trouble understanding it, and I'm kind of at my wit's end about what I should do. (I've tried finding a tutor; that didn't really help. I did a small study group once, and that only kind of helped out.). So, I'm kind of at a loss about what I should do. 
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: kriggy on June 30, 2013, 03:43:47 PM
Hi,
has anyone any experience with this book:
Modern Organic Synthesis - An Introduction by George S. Zweifel and Michael H. Nantz
http://www.organic-chemistry.org/books/reviews/0716772663.shtm
lr can you suggest something similar?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: kayamusty on August 12, 2013, 06:20:07 AM
Graham Solomons's Organic Chemistry is the best
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Vidya on August 26, 2013, 11:10:38 AM
I have very wild experience with different organic chemistry books.
My advise is initially when you are just starting learning organic chemistry ,the best book is by John E. McMurry.
On second stage when you are comfortable with many concepts then you can go for organic chemistry by Paula Y. Bruice .This book  gives you some insight about more difficult concepts and practice on some twisted questions also.Finally if you are doing advance organic chemistry ,then the mother of all organic chemistry  books is by Jerry March .Jerry March is difficult to understand and is only for advance level students.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: clarkstill on September 02, 2013, 12:33:28 PM
Are there any good books that help teach IR and/or NMR spectroscopy? I'm having so much trouble with both.    ???

Spectroscopic Methods in Organic Chemistry, by Williams and Fleming

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Spectroscopic-Methods-Organic-Chemistry-Williams/dp/007711812X

It's pretty hard to beat.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Vidya on September 06, 2013, 08:34:45 PM
For spectroscopy the best book is -Introduction to Spectroscopy by Pavia

http://books.google.co.in/books?id=FkaNOdwk0FQC&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: shalikadm on September 16, 2013, 05:38:42 AM
I have two options to chose from with the money I've got.

1. Organic chemistry 1st ed by Jonathan Clayden
2. Organic chemistry 5th ed by L.G.Wade + Quantitative chemical analysis 6th en by Daniel C. Harris

What will be the best choise ? Second choice seems fair  :)

PS : I am good at high school ochem(thanks to the forum) and Wade's book is a suggested reading in our university syllabus. I'm buying used copies.
  ::) ::) ::)
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Borek on September 18, 2013, 03:10:27 AM
I have two options to chose from with the money I've got.

There is no "one size fits all" solution, as different people find different books better - so unless one of the books listed is awfully bad, each advice you can get would be just a personal opinion, not necessarily suited for your learning style.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: shalikadm on September 18, 2013, 05:23:05 AM
There is no "one size fits all" solution, as different people find different books better - so unless one of the books listed is awfully bad, each advice you can get would be just a personal opinion, not necessarily suited for your learning style.
Thanks a lot for the reply..
The problem is that amazon shows less or no inside content of the books. So it's hard to make a decision on whether it's fit for me. ( in a bookshop you can see inside , no?)
To look inside I have to download pdf copies which is said to be a copyright infringement.
Is it OK to do it if I'm going to delete it after I have made the final decision ?
 :-\
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Borek on September 18, 2013, 07:05:56 AM
To look inside I have to download pdf copies which is said to be a copyright infringement.

Yes.

Quote
Is it OK to do it if I'm going to delete it after I have made the final decision ?

No.

You can always try to browse the book in the library.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: shalikadm on September 18, 2013, 10:20:49 AM
You can always try to browse the book in the library.
Actually there's no such a wide variety of books in our libraries.
There are books but not exactly what I want. Most probablly the university library might have them.Then I have to wait more than a year because I'm not enrolled to the university yet.
I also called the local bookstores but they also have only few books and not the books I'm looking for. But they have a variety of bio-medical books.
There's only few students here who are getting ready for the university-many are taking English/computer courses these days..blur.blurr..

I'm left with no option. I don't think downloading some pdfs to see what's inside is a serious crime.  ;)
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: insertwittyname on November 21, 2013, 12:18:18 AM
Even Organic Chemistry by Finar, I.L is a good one for an entry level student in ochem.
You could also try to find free book previews on google books to see if they suit your style...
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: biomiracle on December 15, 2013, 04:46:02 PM
Hello!

I currently have Organic Chemistry by Wade (8th) and Organic Chemistry as a Second Language I & II, but I recently got an opportunity to get one more textbook on organic chemistry.  I am thinking of either Klein's organic chemistry or Clayden's Organic Chemistry.  Which one do you recommend for use in conjunction with Wade?  I am a current college freshman but I need to study organic chemistry now for my research internships.

Thanks in advance! 
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Archer on December 16, 2013, 04:03:04 AM
If by "Clayden's" book you mean this one http://www.amazon.com/Organic-Chemistry-Jonathan-Clayden/dp/0199270295/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1387184497&sr=8-1&keywords=clayden+organic+chemistry

Then this is the one I would recommend to anyone wishing to further their knowledge of Organis chemistry
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Diseld on December 27, 2013, 02:11:45 PM
Thanks for the info! :)
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: biomiracle on January 12, 2014, 08:21:28 PM
Between Clayden (2nd) and Wade (8th), which one is better in terms of comprehensiveness and understandable writing?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Big-Daddy on April 27, 2014, 10:11:08 AM
Klein for the grounding concepts, the two volumes of Organic Chemistry by I.L. Finar for details, and Clayden for a deeper understanding. :D
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: biomiracle on April 29, 2014, 11:46:41 AM
Sorry about this trouble, but I am trying to choose two organic chemistry textbooks.  I would like to choose one easy-to-understand textbook and one very detailed textbook, or one functional group based textbook and one mechanics based textbook.  What I have in my mind are McMurry, Wade, Clayden, Solomon's, Bruice, and Klein.  Which two textbooks should I buy?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: kriggy on May 08, 2014, 03:08:00 PM
McMurry is easy to understand but I have no experience with others. I suggest go to library and look which suits you.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: biomiracle on May 12, 2014, 07:45:32 PM
Thank you for the suggestion.  I actually narrowed down to combinations of following books:

one from: Wade, Smith, McMurry, Bruice, Carey, or Klein

one from: Clayden or Vollhardt

All textbooks seem same to me...what combination is generally good?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Dan on May 14, 2014, 07:16:39 PM
I would like to choose one easy-to-understand textbook and one very detailed textbook

I used mainly Clayden for basics/concepts and March for very detailed stuff. It's detailed in the sense that it's very dense in terms of volume of information - it's something like an encyclopedia of organic reactions with very extensive references - but doesn't explain things in great detail. It's great for the "I wonder if this transformation is possible..." moments. My views here are based on 5th edition (the one I have). I'm sure it's even better now - it's currently in 7th edition, but you can probably pick up 6th edition cheaply second hand if 7th is too pricey. It's a very good investment and will be helpful throughout an undergraduate degree and beyond - I am not aware of any textbook that comes close in terms of breadth of coverage.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: christian0710 on May 25, 2014, 06:08:11 AM
Hi, I've been looking for the "best" (A difinition for "best" follows) Organic chemistry introductory books available and I'm down to the choice between 3 titles, and Would love to hear some comments of the books, if you have red them :)

Definition of "best book":

The list of 3 organic chemistry books to choose between

1.Organic Chemistry (with Organic ChemistryNOW)  by Joseph Hornback

2. Organic Chemistry by Jonathan Clayden

3. Organic chemistry by David Klein 

What do you guys suggest is the best book?

Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Guitarmaniac86 on May 25, 2014, 07:08:07 AM
Clayden is my favourite by far. The only problem I find with it is that it explains a point then gives 1000000000 examples when a few would do. It is a really good book.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Rutherford on May 25, 2014, 08:24:03 AM
Definitely Clayden. For every reactions there is a detailed explanation of the mechanism and how it works on many examples.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Big-Daddy on May 28, 2014, 07:01:03 AM
Definitely Clayden. For every reactions there is a detailed explanation of the mechanism and how it works on many examples.

I told you so!
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: biomiracle on May 29, 2014, 08:54:44 AM
Then can I start with Wade/Bruice Organic Chemistry and Clayden Organic Chemistry for learning the introductory organic chemistry?After that, can continue with Jerry or Carrey Advanced Organic Chemistry for the further study.  For the introductory level, there are so many good textbooks so I do not know which book to go.  If you know good books other than Wade or Bruice, please let me know.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: SinkingTako on May 29, 2014, 01:10:25 PM
There is also Carey's Organic Chemistry (not Advanced Organic Chemistry), that is also quite good as introductory. Personally prefers it to Clayden, since it's organised by functional groups. Clayden organises it by mechanisms, which can make it harder to read.

Of course, Clayden goes deeper in terms of content.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: christian0710 on June 01, 2014, 09:58:22 AM
Sounds like Clayden is the way to go: Would you recommend the first or second edition of the book?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Big-Daddy on June 01, 2014, 12:57:59 PM
Sounds like Clayden is the way to go: Would you recommend the first or second edition of the book?

Second
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: biomiracle on June 01, 2014, 04:33:47 PM
So Wade Organic Chemistry (8th) and Clayden (2nd) works well?  I would like to know this because I am going to purchase the textbooks by Wednesday.   There are just so many good textbooks in organic chemistry.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: christian0710 on June 02, 2014, 02:04:02 AM
So i Just bought Clayden Organic chemistry 2nd endition: First impression: visually I'd say Organic Chemistry by Joseph Hornback dominates Clayden - The drawings look more pedagogic and easy to understand in Hornbacks (a new book) but then again I've not red a page yet, so when i begin reading i think i'll update this post.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: christian0710 on June 10, 2014, 09:29:10 AM
Hi,
I've red the first 4 chapters in Clayden Organic chemistry, and I gotta admit I find the first chapters on NMR and Orbital theory lacking in explanation and figures. I don't feel like i have a clear understanding of the concept after reading these chapters because they seem to assume knowledge and not give direct methods (explaining the logic of how to work out the problems),  so I'm wondering, Will it keep being like this the next many chapters? Or is it just the beginning that's a bit rough?

I'm afraid that If i can't understand the molecular Orbital theory, then I won't understand the rest of the book, since bonding is explained from Hybridization and molecular orbital.
I've considered David Kleins Organic chemistry, and perhaps Chemistry³: Introducing Inorganic, Organic, and Physical Chemistry 

How do my suggestions sound? Any other suggestions? I'm first year into university studying nutrition but wan't to understand organic chemistry better.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Rutherford on June 16, 2014, 08:04:18 AM
What book about stereochemsitry do you suggest me to read? I want it to have good explanations on pseudochirality, axial chirality, planar chirality and helicity. With practice problems it would be perfect.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: biomiracle on June 26, 2014, 05:59:13 PM
Hello!

I am currently using organic chemistry textbooks by L.G. Wade (8th), Clayden (2nd), and Loudon.  I often heard good things about the Hornback's organic chemistry, which is a mechanism-based textbook.  Do I have to read this alongside with other three textbooks I mentioned above?  Is Hornback better than Wade, Clayden, or Loudon?  I know that Clayden is also a mechanism-based textbook; is Clayden far more comprehensive and better understanding then Hornback?  I apologize for asking so many questions, but many people recommended Hornback. I want to get this book too, but I am curious if Hornback is really needed if I have Wade, Clayden, and Loudon.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: biomiracle on July 07, 2014, 09:39:15 PM
Hello!

I am planning to study the organic chemistry during this summer to prepare for the upcoming organic chemistry course and the current synthetic research lab.  I had posted the similar post to the textbook section, but I did not get a response at all.  I currently own both Loudon's (my university requires this textbook) and Wade's textbook, which are both know to be based on the functional-groups approach.  However, I heard that the mechanism-based learning is much more effective than the functional groups...so I did some research and found out that the Clayden's and Hornback's textbooks are very good in terms of mechanism-based approach to the organic chemistry.   Should I purchase them and supplement the Loudon's?  I also own Klein's second language books, electron pushing, arrow pushing, and model kit. 


Thank you very much for your time, and I look forward to the reply!
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Hunter2 on July 08, 2014, 12:56:19 AM
Only one thing to say: You cannot enough books in my experience. But I wouldn't worry to think to much before the course starts.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Dan on July 08, 2014, 06:52:47 AM
I did some research and found out that the Clayden's and Hornback's textbooks are very good in terms of mechanism-based approach to the organic chemistry.   Should I purchase them and supplement the Loudon's? 

If you have the money, get both. If not, get them out of the library and see if you like them enough to make the investment.

I would strongly recommend Clayden (I used it a lot as an undergrad and liked it). I've never heard of Hornback, so I can't comment on that one.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: davidenarb on July 13, 2014, 02:16:31 AM
Greetings all,

I am about to start reading synthesis textbooks. Although choosing a book is a subjective decision, I would like to know your opinions about the two following textbooks :

-Introduction to Strategies for Organic Synthesis by Laurie S. Starkey
-Organic Synthesis the Disconnection Approach 2nd Edition by Stuart Warren and Paul Wyatt

Thanks
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: zsinger on July 27, 2014, 11:01:47 AM
All,
I am looking for a COMPREHENSIVE book about the nature of strictly mechanisms.  Can be very densely written, but I would like pictures as well, as I believe visualization is the key to understanding.  Lets hear em'!
             Zack
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: salteen on July 27, 2014, 12:28:02 PM
Check out The Art of Writing Reasonable Organic Mechanisms by Grossman.  It's not a comprehensive collection of named reactions as most other books are, but rather teaches you how to approach elucidating mechanisms.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Rutherford on August 11, 2014, 04:15:07 PM
Grossman's book is excellent.
Title: a concise book of organic reactions??
Post by: davidenarb on August 15, 2014, 08:31:48 PM
Hi organic chemists!

Does anyone can recommend a concise book as a reference guide of organic reactions??

Thank you
Title: Re: a concise book of organic reactions??
Post by: Dan on August 19, 2014, 07:59:48 AM
Hi organic chemists!

Does anyone can recommend a concise book as a reference guide of organic reactions??

Thank you

March's Advanced Organic Chemistry
Title: Re: a concise book of organic reactions??
Post by: davidenarb on August 20, 2014, 08:17:39 PM
Hi organic chemists!

Does anyone can recommend a concise book as a reference guide of organic reactions??

Thank you

March's Advanced Organic Chemistry

Thank you Dan for your recommendation. Actually, I am going to organize my personal notebook of synthetically useful reactions, so I am looking specifically for a concise book that summarize just the reactions. It can be, for instance, by functional groups.

Thanks
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Guitarmaniac86 on October 11, 2014, 07:32:06 AM
I bought "Strategic Applications of Named Reactions in Organic Synthesis" by Laszlo Kurti and Barbara Czako. It has about 250 odd named reactions with brief explanations and mechanism, and lots of references. I use it as a reference book as it is not really a study book but if you are serious about Org chem and have the money, its deffo worth the investment (It was bloody expensive though and I only bought it because it looked interesting...)
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: kriggy on October 14, 2014, 01:17:18 PM
I bought "Strategic Applications of Named Reactions in Organic Synthesis" by Laszlo Kurti and Barbara Czako. It has about 250 odd named reactions with brief explanations and mechanism, and lots of references. I use it as a reference book as it is not really a study book but if you are serious about Org chem and have the money, its deffo worth the investment (It was bloody expensive though and I only bought it because it looked interesting...)

Totally agree. Not that I can compare with others but its IMO well written, its detailed but  not that much that it owerhelms you with information (which you can find in more than 50 references to each reaction). THe thing I realy like are the examples from real syntheses, sometimes its kinda difficult (for me at least) imagine the reaction in more complicated molecules
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Ingeniosuccinimide on October 27, 2014, 12:15:41 PM
Did any of you ever use/study through this book to refresh some memories and solve some tasks:

http://ebookee.org/Organic-Chemistry-Problem-Solver-REA-Problem-Solvers-_679342.html

We have the older edition in our office and the book seems interesting. Is it outdated? Can we hear any expreiences/opinions?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Rutherford on November 16, 2014, 05:48:38 AM
What book should be read first by Warren: "Disconnection Approach" or "Strategy and Control"?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: kriggy on November 16, 2014, 12:13:55 PM
Im pretty sure strategy and control is a sequel so disconection approach it is
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Rutherford on December 29, 2014, 03:49:10 AM
Which Advanced Organic Chemistry book is more receptive for undergraduate student, March or Carey/Sundberg?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Dan on December 29, 2014, 09:28:42 AM
Which Advanced Organic Chemistry book is more receptive for undergraduate student, March or Carey/Sundberg?

March is excellent but very dense - it is not as engaging as Carey & Sundberg and can be overwhelming, but is a very useful book to have on the shelf as you become more proficient in the subject. It is better as a reference text than a learning text in my opinion.

I don't recommend March as a main text for 1st year undergrads, but do for 2nd year and beyond. For 1st year I would go with something more engaging to ease you in - like Carey and Sundberg or Clayden, etc.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Rutherford on December 29, 2014, 10:06:04 AM
I am about to finish Clayden, so I will read Carey & Sundberg next. But the MO theory seems to be very deeply examine in that book. Do I need to read first a book in that filed to understand Carey & Sundberg?
Title: practical handbook organic chemistry
Post by: walter.white on January 16, 2015, 05:47:38 PM
can you suggest any book for practical organic chemistry, notably for choosing of solvents for synthesis, TLC, etc. everything about practical organic chemistry
Title: Re: practical handbook organic chemistry
Post by: CrazyAssasin on January 16, 2015, 07:44:04 PM
The one I know is Vogel's practical organic chemistry
Title: introduce book in isolation of organic compounds
Post by: ABA2015 on February 02, 2015, 04:10:25 AM
hi all
I'm seeking a simple,comprehensive and brief book for isolation of organic compounds for under graduate students, can you introduce me any?
thanks for your help
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: ABA2015 on February 08, 2015, 02:44:59 PM
I would be grateful if suggest me a book for identification of organic comp. with classification tests.
thanks
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Borek on May 26, 2015, 02:46:18 AM
Sometimes they have used ones. much cheaper.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: AWK on May 27, 2015, 06:19:35 AM
From times to times check: http://www.betterworldbooks.com/ - sometimes used books cost there 3-5 $ (with free shipping worldwide) - filter: used and bargain bin.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Vidya on May 31, 2015, 08:43:04 AM
Organic Chemistry as a Second Language: First Semester Topics
David R. Klein (Author)
This book has used a very systematic and simple approach for learning chemistry .I have found book more concise and easy to make my students understand even difficult topic of organic chemistry.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: kriggy on May 31, 2015, 11:06:13 AM
Guys is there a big difference between newer versions of the same book? I mean the price difference is sometimes close to 100$.. For example March´s 5ed is for 20 but the 7th is close to 100
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Rutherford on June 28, 2015, 12:11:49 PM
After Clayden, should I continue with the series S.Warren: Disconnection approach and then Strategy & Control or Carey, Sundberg Advanced OC?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Rutherford on August 04, 2015, 09:24:29 AM
Where to find the solutions for Advanced Organic Chemistry by Carey,Sundberg. In the book it is said: A new
feature is solutions to these problems, which are also provided at the publisher’s
website at springer.com/carey-sundberg
The website is complicated: http://www.springer.com/carey-sundberg/TOC/?referer=springer.com. Where are the solutions?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: kriggy on October 06, 2015, 11:54:03 AM
Hi guys, anyone read the Handbook of heterocyclic chemistry by Zhdankin? Im considering getting one from amazon because it is recomended book for my course and the price if affordable (aprox 30-40 bucks for used one) so Im looking for any reviews on this piece..
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Shadow on October 13, 2015, 03:38:04 PM
How would you rank these three books about Molecular Orbitals in organic chemistry: Rauk's http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0471358339.html (http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0471358339.html), Fleming's http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0470746580.html and Ahn T. Nguyen's http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0471973599.html?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: dun13203171 on November 26, 2015, 02:01:02 PM
Guys I am thinking of splashing out for solomons organic chemistry, 11th edition.

Are there any better options out their for an undergrad?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: electronpusher96 on November 26, 2015, 09:06:51 PM
For a short survey of undergraduate organic chemistry topics(covered in a 2 semester organic chemistry course), I highly recommend "Organic Chemistry as a Second Language". It's not super in depth, but offers extremely good explanations and diagrams of most reactions.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Rutherford on December 03, 2015, 01:49:44 PM
What book could I use for practicing asymmetric synthesis? I would like to solve problems with given answers.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Tom Jensen on December 14, 2015, 01:15:14 PM
For the Undergrad, novice, first timer, do any of these books have anything on Sufactants and phosphate builders?
Thanks, Tom
Title: Best Organic Chemistry Resources?
Post by: OCOC on January 15, 2016, 09:27:01 AM
Hi, I was wondering what everyone has found to be the best resources to learn organic chemistry (book, website, study guide, etc). Thanks!
Title: Re: Best Organic Chemistry Resources?
Post by: Rutherford on January 15, 2016, 05:15:24 PM
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Organic-Chemistry-Jonathan-Clayden/dp/0198503466
Title: Re: Best Organic Chemistry Resources?
Post by: phth on January 15, 2016, 11:47:05 PM
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Organic-Chemistry-Jonathan-Clayden/dp/0198503466
+1.  Best book IMO for understanding mechanisms.  From the beginning topics through the more complex problems.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: imacology on February 08, 2016, 07:41:54 PM
What we use in my Polytech is McMurry's Introduction to Organic Chemistry. Seems decent to me, starts from the very basics.

Anyone else have experience with it?
this is a page who contains a great ebooks in organic chemistry and others i hope that it  helping you https://www.facebook.com/freebookssharing/
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: kriggy on February 14, 2016, 11:11:21 AM
Guys could you suggest some advanced orgchem book? Something like Carey and Sundberg? It looks like the I would like but from looking inside the book at amazon page, I find that the non-unified drawing of structures and the fact that sometimes they are not "cleaned up" disturbing. It was suggested to me but Im not sure if I want to spend money on something that is not properly edited.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Rutherford on February 15, 2016, 03:33:50 PM
Is there any textbook about abiotic synthesis of organic molecules? I would like to read about asymmetric induction hypotheses, possible pathways for carbohydrate and aminoacid synthesis etc.
Title: Recommended Books for Organic Synthesis
Post by: AdaBrown on April 25, 2016, 03:23:31 AM
This is a collection of the remarkable books in organic chemistry synthesis.

1, Asymmetric Synthesis - The Essentials, by Mathias Christmann, Stefan Bräse, with ISBN: 978-3-527-32093-6, published by Wiley-VCH

This book doesn’t present the basics of asymmetric synthesis, but lists the topics and the works of the researchers who have made significant advancements in this field. For every researcher and their work, there is a background presented, and then the detail description of their successful work is included.

2, Domino Reactions in Organic Synthesis, by Lutz F. Tietze, Gordon Brasche, Kersten Gericke, with ISBN: 3-527-29060-5, published by Wiley-VCH

This book for advanced students and chemists can be renowned as a textbook in explaining domino Reactions as it depicts the complex sequent reactions according to mechanistic principles with a combination of fundamentals and examples, easy to be grasped. Of note, the number of examples is huge as about 1000 citations are involved. With which every example is listed with huge explanations, leaving no space for misunderstanding.

3, Elements of Synthesis Planning, by Reinhard W. Hoffmann, with ISBN: 978-3-540-79219-2, published by Springer

This is a practical guide book for advanced students on how to apply the related knowledge on synthesis planning to ensure a smooth process and ideal result in easy to be understood language. Besides, the book features in providing valuable practical tips to improve the result. Its first edition was issued in 2009 and examples are quite in date.

4, Advanced Organic Synthesis, by Francis A. Carey, Richard A. Sundberg, with ISBN-13: 978-0-387-68350-8, published by Springer

First edition was presented in 2005, but appeared early in 1977, is one of the most influential textbook like masterpieces in organic synthesis for graduate students. And now the book is in its fifth edition after several round of revision. The general content of the book is divided into two parts, one for basic concept and the other for reaction and synthesis with the aim of providing further understanding.

5, Reactions and Syntheses, by Lutz F. Tietze, Theophil Eicher, Ulf Diederichsen, Andreas Speicher, with ISBN: 978-3-527-31223-8, published by Wiley-VCH

Reactions and Synthesis features in its presentation of natural products and pharmaceuticals synthesis, combining theory with practice. Another important character of this book is that it contains the all essential information for a synthesis experiment, saving the time for looking for protocols and other related instructions. 



6, Modern Organic Synthesis - An Introduction, by George S. Zweifel, Michael H. Nantz, with ISBN: 978-0-716-77266-8, published by W. H. Freeman

This book is for advanced students with solid foundation on the basic knowledge of organic chemistry and synthesis. The main character is that it explains or defines some important reactions and reagents with the authors’ knowing combined with their experience and expertise. Then it condensed some key reactions rather than involve the common ones, which is significant in providing an understanding without involving many other references books.

7, Organic synthesis-State of the Art 2003–2005, by Douglass F. Taber, with ISBN: 0-470-05331-3, published by Wiley-Interscience

This book includes 103 articles introducing the typical synthesis process in detail, as well as their practical applications, providing a huge volume of studying material for further knowledge on organic synthesis. It’s a collection of articles summarizing the reactions for quick view and grasp published in a professional column. With rich examples and explanation, the book is designed for chemists and advanced students in this field.

8, Practical Organic Synthesis, by R. Keese, M. P. Brändle, T.P. Toube, with ISBN: 0-470-02965-X, published by Wiley

In general, this book is about the ground rules that should be complied with in laboratory, besides some tips for better control on the chemicals needed in organic synthesis. Here are some of the topics the book covers-
   safety in the laboratory
   environmentally responsible handling of chemicals and solvents
   crystallisation
   distillation
   chromatographic methods
The content can assist the experiment process carried out smoothly especially in the fundamental operation. Thus both undergraduate students and advanced students can benefit from this book.


9, Science of Synthesis: Water in Organic Synthesis, by Shu Kobayashi, with ISBN: 978-3131693518, published by Thieme
Sciences of Synthesis: Water in Organic Synthesis is on the water usage in organic synthesis, a useful book for chemists. It emphasizes the application of water to replace some organic solvent on the condition that the whole process can still be carried out and the target result won’t be influenced. Another standout feature of the book is that it’s indexed by pair keywords, very convenient for searching.

10, Side Reactions in Organic Synthesis, by Florencio Zaragoza Dörwald, ISBN: 3-527-31021-5, published by Wiley-VCH

Side Reactions in Organic Synthesis can be a guide book for advanced students and chemists to improve the success rate by avoiding some mistakes. With concentrates on several important reactions, most frequently encountered reasons causing the failures and the way to avoid them are presented, allowing participants quickly reversing the trouble-some situations.

11, Classics in Total Synthesis, by K. C. Nicolaou, Eric J. Sorensen, with ISBN: 3-527-29231-4, published by Wiley-VCH
Firstly published in 1996, the two books of Classics in Total Synthesis have been considered as must read books among chemists. The most important substance synthesis happened during the period of 1950-1955 are concluded in this book and the general process of the successes are presented.

12, Classics in Total Synthesis II, by K. C. Nicolaou, Scott A. Snyder, with ISBN: 3-527-30684-6, published by Wiley-VCH
Classics in Total Synthesis II follows the content and style of Classics in Total Synthesis, but presented some of the most latest examples of the most important natural substance synthesis in 1990’s. It’s a sequential volume after the former one being accepted by readers.


13, Total Synthesis of Natural Products: At the Frontiers of Organic Chemistry, by Jie Jack Li, E. J. Corey, with ISBN: 978-3-642-34065-9, published by Springer
Total synthesis of Natural Products is a gathering of 11 leading scientists, in which the difficulties they were faced during the synthesis of natural products and the ways to deal with these problems are presented in their own style, being quite readable.

14, Green Techniques for Organic Synthesis and Medicinal Chemistry, by Wei Zhang, Berkeley Cue, with ISBN: 978-0-470-71151-4, published by Wiley
With the increasing importance to be environment friendly in every aspect of chemistry, green matters to contribute a general green chemistry. Green Techniques for Organic Synthesis and Medicinal Chemistry provides a collection of the established and emerging techniques from the perspective of being green for both researches and productions.

15, Design and strategy in organic synthesis: from the Chiron approach to catalysis, by Stephen Hanessian, Simon Giroux and Bradley L. Merner, with ISBN: 978-3-527-31964-0, published by Wiley-VCH
This book, written by a leading organic chemist, Stephen Hanessian with the help of his colleagues, is for graduate students. A novel synthesis planning is presented in the book. Key points are put on chiral synthesis, but catalytic asymmetric methods are also discussed. It’s considered as a must-have book for professionals in the field.

If there are more good books in the field you know, please add them in the comment to make the list more significant.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: TVC on May 17, 2016, 08:57:46 PM
The book E-Z Organic Chemistry by Bruce A. Hathaway is quite good. Just another OChem book, but I really liked it. Also, almost all of the books in the SM Library here (http://library.sciencemadness.org/library/index.html) on OChem which I've read are great, specifically Vogel's Practical Organic Chemistry, ed.3. It contains a great collection of syntheses which are profitable to look through for getting an idea of the practical side of chemistry.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Rutherford on July 22, 2016, 06:03:24 AM
Where to find the solutions to Michael Smith Organic Synthesis 3rd edition? In the book it is written that there is a free solution manual online but I cannot find it.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: AWK on July 22, 2016, 07:46:18 AM
Information on Author Home (uconn.edu)
The solutions manual is online as a pdf file for each chapter. It wil be made available upon request to those who order the book.
Title: recommended books for a chemist researcher
Post by: GinaTageldin on March 07, 2017, 08:52:22 AM
Hi all, i need valuable books for both designing drugs and most of organic reaction. but with an easy language and which topics would i start with????(graduate level)
Title: Re: recommended books for a chemist researcher
Post by: AWK on March 07, 2017, 11:07:37 AM
On drug synthesis search for books of Daniel Lednicer and Jie Jack Li.
Title: Re: recommended books for a chemist researcher
Post by: Dan on March 08, 2017, 02:27:51 AM
need the basics in a simple form.

Typically that is not what a graduate level book is. Maybe undergraduate level is what you are looking for? Maybe Clayden for general organic chemistry and Graham Partick's "Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry"?
Title: books??
Post by: GinaTageldin on March 11, 2017, 01:54:50 PM
please i need books or a book for 3D QSAR, design of peptidomimetics, protein homology modelling, and the transition from agonists to antagonists.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: sjb on May 13, 2017, 09:37:00 AM
If by "Clayden's" book you mean this one http://www.amazon.com/Organic-Chemistry-Jonathan-Clayden/dp/0199270295/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1387184497&sr=8-1&keywords=clayden+organic+chemistry

Then this is the one I would recommend to anyone wishing to further their knowledge of Organis chemistry

This book would be very challenging for someone without prior knowledge of organic chemistry or at least a gentler introduction to the topics..

Interesting - what would you recommend in place?
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: kriggy on May 16, 2017, 07:36:42 AM
Can anyone recomend a good book on stereoselective synthesis? Im looking for something tha explains the real basics but covers the depth as well.
Im getting the oxford primer and we have Atkinson, R.S. Stereoselective Synthesis. John Wiley & Sons, New York, USA, 1995. as a recomended one but it is 20 years old so Im bit worried that its sligtly outdated.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: clarkstill on May 24, 2017, 07:26:00 AM
Can anyone recomend a good book on stereoselective synthesis? Im looking for something tha explains the real basics but covers the depth as well.
Im getting the oxford primer and we have Atkinson, R.S. Stereoselective Synthesis. John Wiley & Sons, New York, USA, 1995. as a recomended one but it is 20 years old so Im bit worried that its sligtly outdated.

Depends what you're looking for, but Classics in Stereoselective Synthesis is a good one:

http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-3527299661.html
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: kriggy on June 19, 2017, 04:02:28 PM
Thanks. I got asymetric synthesis by Garry Procter and it seems great for me. I will look into the classics when I get more time
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: FireWalkWithMe on June 20, 2017, 01:49:55 PM
Haven't seen any book nearly as good as Klein's textbook for an undergraduate Organic Chemistry class, not just in this subject but anywhere else. Clayden's better for theories but I don't get the point of that if you don't get to develop skills and learn how to apply them.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Vidya on July 27, 2017, 09:04:42 AM
Hi
I have seen now many professors are using Klein book and I am getting every second student requesting to use this book in tutoring class.I also really liked the book as it covers from very basics and advance concepts very nicely with plenty of solved examples.
Organic Chemistry
David R. Klein
Title: What book to learn from after first year organic chemistry?
Post by: lakers4sho on September 13, 2017, 12:20:05 PM
So I am about to finish the year of sophomore Organic Chemistry (at the level of Klein/Janice Smith). I'd like to move on to more complicated treatments of the subject. What is the next book that will be accessible to me? Can I dive right into Carey/Sundberg? Or should I go through an intermediate text, like, say Stowell (Fabirkiewicz)?

Thanks
Title: Where do I start!?
Post by: dew3554 on December 11, 2017, 10:13:59 AM
Hey, im really interested in organic chemistry and i would really like to learn the basics up to synthesis. Today I learned about functional groups, how they're defined and how they worked. However I dont know where to go from here, ive googled the steps up to learning synthesis and couldnt find anything, could somebody tell me what i need to learn in order to get up to learning synthesis, currently i only have basic knowledge of chemistry, I got a B in high school chemistry and it is a really interesting and enjoyable subject that id like to learn and possibly get a degree in. Thanks for taking your time to read this,

Drew.
Title: Re: Where do I start!?
Post by: OrganicDan96 on December 11, 2017, 10:51:58 AM
books are a good way to learn, but like with many things take small steps, don't run before you can walk.

learning curly arrows and simple reactions. also it's important to understand nucleophillicity and electrophillicity which require an understanding of electrons and electronegativity.
Title: Re: Where do I start!?
Post by: earthnation112 on December 13, 2017, 06:33:34 PM
Hey, im really interested in organic chemistry and i would really like to learn the basics up to synthesis. Today I learned about functional groups, how they're defined and how they worked. However I dont know where to go from here, ive googled the steps up to learning synthesis and couldnt find anything, could somebody tell me what i need to learn in order to get up to learning synthesis, currently i only have basic knowledge of chemistry, I got a B in high school chemistry and it is a really interesting and enjoyable subject that id like to learn and possibly get a degree in. Thanks for taking your time to read this,

Drew.

A good book to go through not all of it but some chapters is Organic Chemistry by Jonathan Clayden, its seen as the gold standards for undergraduate students, similar to the atkins series for physical and inorganic chemistry. 
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: MangoPaws on January 09, 2018, 12:53:34 PM
Genuinely curious; I started my undergraduate degree with Louden's Organic Chemistry and preferred the explanations and felt the readability was better than Clayden. Does anyone agree?
Title: Practical organic synthesis textbook with preparation procedures
Post by: Rutherford on February 24, 2018, 04:12:14 PM
What is the best textbook that contains reliable preparation procedures of different organic compounds? I have Practical Organic Chemistry by Vogel, but all the procedures are written for extremely large scale reactions.
Title: Re: Practical organic synthesis textbook with preparation procedures
Post by: wildfyr on February 24, 2018, 06:27:01 PM
Orgsyn might be a place to look. It's a website/journal, not a textbook though.
Title: Re: Practical organic synthesis textbook with preparation procedures
Post by: Rutherford on February 25, 2018, 09:44:07 AM
I would like to have a reference with chapters divided by the type of transformation.
Title: Re: Practical organic synthesis textbook with preparation procedures
Post by: clarkstill on February 25, 2018, 12:29:06 PM
I like Jie Jack Li's 'Modern Organic Synthesis in the Laboratory'

https://global.oup.com/ushe/product/modern-organic-synthesis-in-the-laboratory-9780195187991?cc=us&lang=en&

Really handy for standard transformations where searching scifinder finds a million hits.
Title: Re: Good Organic Chemistry Books
Post by: Babcock_Hall on February 25, 2018, 01:05:19 PM
One book that I often look through is Tietze and Eicher's Reactions and Syntheses.