June 19, 2019, 11:11:49 AM
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Topic: Concentrating Hydrogen Peroxide  (Read 261 times)

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Offline Noah517

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Concentrating Hydrogen Peroxide
« on: June 10, 2019, 09:53:49 PM »
Hello! Before I dive into my problem, I would like to explain that I know the risks of concentrating 3% hydrogen peroxide. I am taking necessary safety measures to ensure nothing goes wrong. I am not going to create more then ~15% hydrogen peroxide. My question is actually about one of my safety measures. I am using a fume hood. Because I don't want to be constantly watching over my setup to make sure it doesn't start boiling and decomposing, I am creating a device using an Arduino microcontroller and DS18B20 temperature sensor to make sure that the electric heating element keeps the hydrogen peroxide at the correct temperature. Everything works fine but I had the realization that the temperature sensor inside the hydrogen peroxide, while it is heating up, could create a surface for it to decompose quicker. If you want to see what the sensor looks like I have attached the link for it below. I was just wondering if using the temperature sensor inside the hydrogen peroxide would cause decomposition.

Thank You,
Noah

Link for temperature sensor:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B012C597T0/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Offline Borek

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Re: Concentrating Hydrogen Peroxide
« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2019, 02:52:10 AM »
I doubt it is designed to work submerged, especially in the corrosive solution, so your problems probably start before decomposition (which can be determined experimentally).
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Offline Enthalpy

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Re: Concentrating Hydrogen Peroxide
« Reply #2 on: June 11, 2019, 05:38:28 AM »
It's not only a matter of contact surface or accelerated decomposition. Peroxide will probably nibble the cable's insulator.

Offline Noah517

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Re: Concentrating Hydrogen Peroxide
« Reply #3 on: June 11, 2019, 09:11:43 AM »
It's not only a matter of contact surface or accelerated decomposition. Peroxide will probably nibble the cable's insulator.

That is a really good point. The temperature sensor is waterproof, but I don’t know how it will hold up to hydrogen peroxide. The actual sensor part is a 1 inch stainless steel tube, and then the rubber cable is attached to the end of that. Do you think that if I just put in the stainless steel part in the hydrogen peroxide it will cause it to  corrode? I don’t know if hydrogen peroxide can corrode stainless steel. If it can’t, would the surface area of the steel cause decomposition?

Noah
« Last Edit: June 11, 2019, 09:39:53 AM by Noah517 »

Offline wildfyr

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Re: Concentrating Hydrogen Peroxide
« Reply #4 on: June 11, 2019, 10:07:30 AM »
I suspect exposed metal does cause peroxide decomposition on its own, let alone at raised temps. Transition metals catalyze the decomposition of organic peroxides I know.

Offline Noah517

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Re: Concentrating Hydrogen Peroxide
« Reply #5 on: June 11, 2019, 10:24:23 AM »
Thank you for the help. I'll probably attach the temperature sensor the heating element to prevent decomposition.

Noah

Offline David Tan

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Re: Concentrating Hydrogen Peroxide
« Reply #6 on: June 14, 2019, 04:58:18 PM »
In the school lab, hydrogen peroxide is typically kept in dark bottles because it is very light sensitive. If it is already light sensitive, then it make sense to conclude that it should be heat sensitive too. In fact, it can further catalysed by transition metal compounds such as manganese(IV) oxide.
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