August 22, 2019, 01:10:35 AM
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Topic: Regarding polarity of a molecule  (Read 202 times)

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Offline jeramieh12

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Regarding polarity of a molecule
« on: August 07, 2019, 01:27:40 PM »
Which method really determines the polarity of a molecule? the lewis structure or the electronegativity because the electronegativity of SH2 contradicts the result of the lewis structure being polar. searched it up online and it said it was polar but i cant really quite get why. need help i have a huge test tmr XD

Offline Babcock_Hall

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Re: Regarding polarity of a molecule
« Reply #1 on: August 07, 2019, 01:35:26 PM »
I had a difficult time trying to understand your question.  Would you expect an isolated H-S bond to have a dipole on the basis of electronegativities of H and S?  If so, is the geometry of the H2S molecule such that individual dipoles cancel out?

Offline AWK

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Re: Regarding polarity of a molecule
« Reply #2 on: August 07, 2019, 02:49:31 PM »
You should take into account the shape of the molecule.
AWK

Offline AlirezaDehghani

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Re: Regarding polarity of a molecule
« Reply #3 on: August 09, 2019, 02:52:43 AM »
the electronegativities difference is about 0.38. it doesn't matter how much difference we have any way their electronegativies are different and because of the bent shape of molecule it will be polar.
but if you consider ozone you will find out despite of the bent shape of the molecule its non polar because all atoms are the same and there is no difference in their electronegativies.     

Offline mjc123

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Re: Regarding polarity of a molecule
« Reply #4 on: August 09, 2019, 04:30:59 AM »
Ozone has a dipole moment of 0.53D. If you look at the Lewis structures, the central O has a positive charge and the terminal atoms share a negative charge. That's what comes of giving each atom a complete octet. Although there is no electronegativity difference between the atoms, the electron distribution is such that the centres of positive and negative charge do not coincide, so there is a dipole moment. This is generally the case for bent (C2v) molecules, or any where the symmetry does not compel a zero dipole moment.

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