February 17, 2020, 02:36:52 AM
Forum Rules: Read This Before Posting


Topic: In HPLC, why are mixtures in a certain ratio?  (Read 253 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline OfficialAnu

  • New Member
  • **
  • Posts: 5
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-0
In HPLC, why are mixtures in a certain ratio?
« on: September 04, 2019, 07:22:04 PM »
For example, to separate two similarly polar molecules such as water and 1-pentanol, why is the mixture in a ratio (ex. 70:30)? How does this create more visible separation?
« Last Edit: September 04, 2019, 07:33:20 PM by OfficialAnu »

Offline jeffmoonchop

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 185
  • Mole Snacks: +14/-1
  • Gender: Male
Re: In HPLC, why are mixtures in a certain ratio?
« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2019, 11:36:56 PM »
Water is way more polar than pentanol. Not sure what you're asking about the ratios though. With HPLC, you can calculate the quantity of each in a mixture. So if it's 70:30, then its because someone made a mixture of 70:30 water: pentanol. I should also note that pentanol is not miscible with water so you actually wouldn't be able to make a mixture without some additives.

Sponsored Links