November 14, 2019, 10:38:47 AM
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Topic: Quetiapine and immunoglobulin G  (Read 495 times)

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Offline Blackbox

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Quetiapine and immunoglobulin G
« on: September 24, 2019, 01:09:28 AM »
Hoping someone can give me an idea of what likely reactions would take place between seroquel (quetiapine), a thiazepine, and an immunoglobulin G (not sure of exact one), under physiological conditions.

 I'm hoping to find out in general what interactions/reactions are likely to occur, if they are reversible, and what if anything might disrupt the interactions.

Offline Babcock_Hall

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Re: Quetiapine and immunoglobulin G
« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2019, 10:00:34 AM »
What are your thoughts so far?

Offline hollytara

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Re: Quetiapine and immunoglobulin G
« Reply #2 on: September 24, 2019, 11:30:57 AM »
Do antibodies recognize small molecules?

Offline Blackbox

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Re: Quetiapine and immunoglobulin G
« Reply #3 on: September 25, 2019, 10:56:32 PM »
What are your thoughts so far?

I was considering there'd be hydrophobic interactions with some parts of the protein but wanted to find out from anyone more familiar with antibodies if there could possibly be covalent reactions taking place. 

Offline Babcock_Hall

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Re: Quetiapine and immunoglobulin G
« Reply #4 on: September 26, 2019, 09:07:46 AM »
Is this a homework exercise?  According to the rules of the forum (see red link above), you must show your work or provide your thoughts before we can help you.  In this case your question may be slightly more complex than it first appears, because it seems to me that the drug in question undergoes conversion in the body into another form.

Offline Blackbox

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Re: Quetiapine and immunoglobulin G
« Reply #5 on: September 26, 2019, 12:28:29 PM »
Is this a homework exercise?  According to the rules of the forum (see red link above), you must show your work or provide your thoughts before we can help you.  In this case your question may be slightly more complex than it first appears, because it seems to me that the drug in question undergoes conversion in the body into another form.

I understand but no, unfortunately I'm not a student and this isn't a homework assignment.  I've tried reading up on all the known properties of quetiapine but cannot seem to find what interactions it may have with proteins, only that it is about 83% plasma protein bound.

Offline AWK

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Re: Quetiapine and immunoglobulin G
« Reply #6 on: September 26, 2019, 04:21:52 PM »
Look at the structure of quetiapine and read carefully the summary of the pharmacokinetics of this drug, from which information about 83% plasma protein binding is probably derived. Quetiapine is not an alkylating drug, so plasma protein binding is reversible. A half-life of approximately 7 hours and the amount of excreted metabolites (73 + 21%) over an indefinite period (probably about a week) also confirms reversible binding of the drug to plasma proteins.
AWK

Offline Babcock_Hall

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Re: Quetiapine and immunoglobulin G
« Reply #7 on: September 26, 2019, 10:33:30 PM »
You might look into human serum albumin as another candidate protein.

Offline Blackbox

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Re: Quetiapine and immunoglobulin G
« Reply #8 on: September 26, 2019, 11:21:46 PM »
You might look into human serum albumin as another candidate protein.

I'm specifically concerned about interactions between quetiapine and an IgG monoclonal antibody. 

I see the metabolite mentioned in the literature is a secondary amine.  I'm wondering how reactive this functional group would be, or if I should focus my inquiry on the seven member ring.

Offline Babcock_Hall

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Re: Quetiapine and immunoglobulin G
« Reply #9 on: October 02, 2019, 04:36:46 PM »
Secondary amines may be nucleophilic; however, that may not be relevant to your question.  You might try a search on this subject at PubMed.

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