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Topic: Hybridization  (Read 8025 times)

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aficesk8ingal

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Hybridization
« on: September 07, 2004, 08:18:55 PM »
 ??? Hi!  I was wondering if any of you could help me with the hybridization of diazomethane.  I have a structure set up that is H2C=N=Nwith two pairs of electrons.  I know how to find hybridization for the C and middle N by counting the pairs of electrons around it, but I don't know how to find the hybridization of the end N since it has only 1 double bond and 2 lone pairs.  I'm confused if the lone pairs effect hybridization, or if the double bond just automatically indicates sp hybridization.  Any insights would be amazing!  Thanks!  ;D

Demotivator

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Re:Hybridization
« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2004, 10:46:10 PM »
The double bond doesn't automatically indicate sp. For eg, NO3- has a double bond and it's sp2.
As a guide,  any atom with exactly two "groups" (a group is a lone pair of electrons or a bond regardless of bond order ie single double or triple) is sp hybridized. An atom with three groups is sp2 hybridized; one with four groups is sp3 hybridized.
So the end N has a one double bond (1 group) and 2 lone pairs (2 groups). Total is 3 groups, so sp2.

Offline Mitch

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Re:Hybridization
« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2004, 01:20:21 AM »
Demotivator is right. The geometry of the atom will determine the hybridization. The N has 3 groups which define a plane and would have to indicate sp2 hybridized. It is tricky, so I understand your confusion, that is while most Chemist tend to avoid Valence Bond Theory.
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Offline Donaldson Tan

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Re:Hybridization
« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2004, 03:50:08 PM »
I have a structure set up that is H2C=N=N with two pairs of electrons.

Perhaps I'll describe H2C=N=N in terms of the number of electrons on each atom in the molecule.

Each H contain only a bonding pair (C-H) each.

The C atom contains 4 bonding pairs.

The N attach to C has 4 valence electron. It has donated its 5th electron to the other N atom and inherit a positive charge on it. It exhibits a valency of 4, thus contains 4 bonding pairs.

The last N has 6 valence electrons. It accepted it 6th electron from the othe N atom, thus inherit a negative charge. It exhibits a valency of 2, thus forming double bond with the N atom.


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Demotivator

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Re:Hybridization
« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2004, 07:12:45 PM »
Yeah, ok but there are two other contributing  resonance structures of diazomethane. That means that in reality, the end N does not accept a full electron. In the other structures the end N looks like its sp hybridized and does not accept an electron. It just so happens that the other 2 structures are minor contributors but enough to make tne actual end N hybridization to be sp1.8.  :)
« Last Edit: September 08, 2004, 07:21:06 PM by Demotivator »

aficesk8ingal

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Re:Hybridization
« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2004, 01:14:43 AM »
Thank you all so much for your replies!    :)  It makes a lot more sense now, and I really appreciate your *delete me*!!  Thanks again!!!!  ;D

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