December 12, 2019, 05:35:38 AM
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Topic: Suggestion: allowing problems to be posted without trying to solve it  (Read 546 times)

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Offline INeedSerotonin

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Hello

I know this is against the forum rules, but I will leave the suggestion here anyway. There is a very famous Physics/Mathematics Brazilian forum on the internet that allows every exercise to be posted as it is. Then whoever wants to solve it can solve it.

The rules that they keep with iron first are "write the exercise's utterance/wording/problem/stem by hand. It cannot be an image, so it can be found on Google or Bing. Use images only for better understanding of the problem (for matrices, equations etc). Give all of the alternatives if you have them."

This way lots of people can find the forum by searching a specific problem, question or exercise on Google, and they can learn from previous solutions.

Basically, this aims to help this forum become a huge database of exercises with utterance and alternatives. This helps lots of students who are trying to pass admission exams to universities.
« Last Edit: October 22, 2019, 05:48:41 PM by INeedSerotonin »

Offline AWK

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Re: Suggestion: allowing problems to be posted without trying to solve it
« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2019, 08:03:55 PM »
Think about why you study chemistry (or another subject). Probably to be able to solve professional problems in the future, isn't it? Can you learn this by copying someone else's solutions, sometimes with errors - without your thinking?
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Offline INeedSerotonin

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Re: Suggestion: allowing problems to be posted without trying to solve it
« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2019, 07:05:24 AM »
Think about why you study chemistry (or another subject). Probably to be able to solve professional problems in the future, isn't it? Can you learn this by copying someone else's solutions, sometimes with errors - without your thinking?

This is an interesting point. Indeed just seeing somebody else's solution is more practical, but building knowledge from scratch with the help of others is much more educational. I hadn't thought about it before.

It's a good point.

Offline AWK

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