December 07, 2019, 04:19:38 AM
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Topic: crown ether workup  (Read 217 times)

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Offline 408

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crown ether workup
« on: November 09, 2019, 11:40:51 AM »
After a reaction using crown ether is added to water and extracted, how does it affect where things go?  I'm worried it will end up in my organic layer, can it just get pulled out under high vac?  I've never dealt with crown ethers before.

Offline AWK

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Re: crown ether workup
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2019, 01:32:44 PM »
There are hundreds of crown ethers. I expect you used one of three: 18-crown-6, dibenzo-18-crown-6 or 15-crown-5. There are a lot of organic compounds. With such precise information you provide, you can only count on yourself.
Check the properties of your crown ether, compare with known or expected properties of the compound you synthesize and select the appropriate separation procedure.
And maybe all you can findin the procedure by which you conducted the synthesis.
AWK

Offline kamiyu2550

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Re: crown ether workup
« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2019, 01:55:22 PM »
After a reaction using crown ether is added to water and extracted, how does it affect where things go?  I'm worried it will end up in my organic layer, can it just get pulled out under high vac?  I've never dealt with crown ethers before.

I feel you gave too little information. As AWK said, there are lots of possible crown ethers. Their boiling points vary.

You can try recrystallization, crown ether isn't very crystalline.

Another is column chromatography. Crown ether should be pretty polar.

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