February 18, 2020, 04:09:28 AM
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Topic: Question steel and vapor acid  (Read 658 times)

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Offline metroidfan

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Question steel and vapor acid
« on: November 11, 2019, 02:16:38 PM »

surgical steel is corroded oxidized by some presence of muriatic acid vapor in the environment?

Offline Enthalpy

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Re: Question steel and vapor acid
« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2019, 01:48:27 PM »
"Surgical steel" isn't accurate enough. It can belong to very different families of stainless steel
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Surgical_stainless_steel

The hard martensitic or ledeburitic stainless steels make cutting tools, possibly some prostheses. They definitely won't resist hydrochloric acid. Even a short exposure would collapse its future resistance to water, needing special cleaning.

The softer austenitic stainless steel, of "surgical" or marine composition (Aisi 316L or 17Cr-12Ni-Mo-blahblah) makes piercings and some implants. It resists hydrochloric acid in reasonable concentration at room temperature.

Offline metroidfan

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Re: Question steel and vapor acid
« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2019, 02:32:52 PM »

Do I clean bathroom with muriatic acid generate a muriatic vapor spread throughout the house corroding these metals?  vapor muriatic acid corrosion?
I refer to the surgical steel of the balls used in supplement mix shakers


Offline Borek

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Re: Question steel and vapor acid
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2019, 04:40:11 PM »
We told you many times that it is impossible to answer precisely your questions as there are way too many unknowns.
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Offline pcm81

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Re: Question steel and vapor acid
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2020, 10:59:20 PM »
This reply is meant for the benefit of future readers, because i guess OP is long gone by now...

Anyhow, HCl, which is the acid present in Muriatic acid, should never be used to clean any steel. Chlorine will remain on the surface and accelerate corrosion.

Stainless steel seems to not rust, because it is passivated.
An acid like nitric acid or citric acid is used to selectively dissolve iron from the surface increasing percentage of chromium from ~11%, as found in bulk stainless steel, to a much higher amount at the surface. The exposure to air and moisture causes chromium to oxidize, forming chromium oxide layer. Unlike rust, chromium oxide layer is much stronger than iron oxide hence it stays on the surface and protects against further rusting. Eventually, wear and tear will degrade the chromium oxide layer exposing fresh iron atoms and rust will form. Repassivation can fix the issue.
For a home DIYer the citric acid is the best bet since nitric acid can be a rather nasty chemical to deal with.

Offline gamemaniaco

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Re: Question steel and vapor acid
« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2020, 04:47:18 AM »

I will not clean anything with muriatic acid I just talked about muriatico steam for domestic use sold in Brazil

Offline pcm81

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Re: Question steel and vapor acid
« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2020, 10:28:48 PM »

I will not clean anything with muriatic acid I just talked about muriatico steam for domestic use sold in Brazil

Some things are OK to be cleaned with muriatic acid. For example HCl and in some cases even HF are the active ingredients in concrete cleaners. These strong acids are usually present in VERY low concentrations and some other acid like Oxalic is present in higher concentration to "pick-up" the things HCl reacts with. HCl can be useful for cleaning outside concrete, because it is a gas, so it will evaporate leaving only reaction products like iron chloride from rust stains. On the other hand, metals should not me cleaned with HCl, unless you specifically know why you need to use it for a specific case.

Offline gamemaniaco

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Re: Question steel and vapor acid
« Reply #7 on: February 06, 2020, 04:42:36 AM »
In Brazil, no regulation of HCL concentration in muriatic acid for domestic use sold in supermarkets?

Offline pcm81

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Re: Question steel and vapor acid
« Reply #8 on: February 06, 2020, 08:13:53 PM »
In Brazil, no regulation of HCL concentration in muriatic acid for domestic use sold in supermarkets?

HCL is a gas at room temperature. Highest concentration attainable in water at room temperature and 1 ATM pressure is about 39%. Muriatic acid is usually 32%, but technically speaking anything between 0 and 39 can exist and be sold.

Offline gamemaniaco

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Re: Question steel and vapor acid
« Reply #9 on: February 06, 2020, 08:17:29 PM »

For home use cleaning floors in bathrooms what concentration of HCL do manufacturers use? is a high volatile concentration?

Offline pcm81

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Re: Question steel and vapor acid
« Reply #10 on: February 06, 2020, 08:27:35 PM »

For home use cleaning floors in bathrooms what concentration of HCL do manufacturers use? is a high volatile concentration?
I would not use HCl inside home, but if you insist on using it I'd go for less than 1%. For best results add a weak acid to water and less than 1% HCl. Give it time,several minutes... don't expect instant results. If you are seeing instant results, chances are you have too much HCl concentration and you will contaminate house with chlorine gas.If you see the liquid changing color instantly on contact with dirty surface, chances are you have too much HCl.

Offline gamemaniaco

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Re: Question steel and vapor acid
« Reply #11 on: February 06, 2020, 08:41:06 PM »

I don’t use it but I already used it and I don’t remember the concentration so I asked to know if it’s high it’s going to evaporate spread over the house and deposit in electronic devices starting corrosion

Offline Borek

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Re: Question steel and vapor acid
« Reply #12 on: February 07, 2020, 03:25:30 AM »
i guess OP is long gone by now...

OP ignores what they are told, ask the same questions again and again, wastes our time, is getting banned and reregisters only to repost and ignore our answers again.

www.chemicalforums.com/index.php?topic=101427.0
https://www.chemicalforums.com/index.php?topic=101885.0
https://www.chemicalforums.com/index.php?topic=102495.0

Topic locked, there is nothing that can be added to what was said in the previous threads.
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