December 12, 2019, 09:38:16 PM
Forum Rules: Read This Before Posting


Topic: Is the rate of electroplating dependent on temperature? Investigation  (Read 156 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline M6EE

  • Very New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1
  • Mole Snacks: +0/-0
I am a senior year IB student and for my internal assessment in HL Chemistry, I was thinking about investigating if the rate at which a surface of a metal is electroplated is dependent on the temperature of the solution. The only thing I am unsure about is whether such an investigation would not be too simple, too easy. Thank you in advance for answers.

Offline chenbeier

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 693
  • Mole Snacks: +61/-17
  • Gender: Male
Re: Is the rate of electroplating dependent on temperature? Investigation
« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2019, 10:52:20 AM »
Not realy, the plating amount is related to the Law of Faraday. The parameters are, current, time and the element what should be deposit. The temperature gives only an effect of quality, ductility of the deposit.

Offline Enthalpy

  • Chemist
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3206
  • Mole Snacks: +278/-57
Re: Is the rate of electroplating dependent on temperature? Investigation
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2019, 10:10:14 AM »
Electroplating uses to go wrong and need much practice. I wouldn't choose that for a short project.

If really electroplating, then I'd suggest Ni-Mo, Co-Mo and Ni-Co-Mo alloys. I haven't read about them, Mo has a redox potential very close to Ni and Co so hopefully it co-deposits easily, and with some luck, few % Mo improve a property of electrodeposited Ni and Ni-Co, like the hardness. Ni is among the easiest metals to deposit. The experiment needs some means to analyse the layer and preferably to measure a hardness (maybe a sewing needle suffices, hold with the fingers).

As a teen, I obtained a polymer from dry NaOH with Al chips poured in 1,1,1-trichloroethane. Room temperature and pressure, reaction started immediately. What elements does the polymer contain: C, H, O? I say no Cl from the odour when burning and from the density. I suspect a polyketone.

Is it chemistry? Replace water with a solid paraffin in a hot water bottle. Measure that the solidification of paraffin provides more heat than cooling water, and at a more constant temperature. That one is clearly useful.

Measure accurately the density of pure straight alkanes when solid at 77K, say C6 to C11. Check if any even-odd effect.

Sponsored Links