December 12, 2019, 09:38:17 PM
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Topic: Arrangement of Products of Addition Reaction  (Read 127 times)

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Offline JoeyBob

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Arrangement of Products of Addition Reaction
« on: December 04, 2019, 07:33:17 PM »
The answer is I. But when I make a model of the double bonded molecule, the methyl group and hydrogen are equatorial. Yet when an addition reaction occurs, why/how does the hydrogen change from its equatorial position to an axial position?

If I take apart the model and turn it into hexane, the methyl and hydrogen are still both equatorial and the new groups are both axial, so it can't just be the change in conformation from a chair forming.

Offline hollytara

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Re: Arrangement of Products of Addition Reaction
« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2019, 09:28:50 PM »
First - since double bonds are planar, in a cyclohexene, the alkene substituents are ALWAYS equatorial - they can't be axial.

How does D2 (or H2) add to an Alkene using a metal catalyst?

Will the added D's be cis or trans - the product may change conformation after it is formed. 

checkout the book by Jakob Fredlos!

Offline JoeyBob

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Re: Arrangement of Products of Addition Reaction
« Reply #2 on: December 04, 2019, 10:00:43 PM »
First - since double bonds are planar, in a cyclohexene, the alkene substituents are ALWAYS equatorial - they can't be axial.

How does D2 (or H2) add to an Alkene using a metal catalyst?

Will the added D's be cis or trans - the product may change conformation after it is formed. 

checkout the book by Jakob Fredlos!

Oh, so because of the mechanism it's a syn a addition (cis), correct? Is there a method for creating trans products/using anti additions?

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