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Topic: DMF Question  (Read 12289 times)

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LuckyDude35

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Re:DMF Question
« Reply #15 on: September 08, 2004, 03:07:38 AM »
Ok, thanks! This would be SN2 substition correct? And I'm sure this is going to sound dumb but what does it substitute with, the DMF?

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Re:DMF Question
« Reply #16 on: September 08, 2004, 03:14:42 AM »
SN1 vs. SN2 is a little less clear cut, but in this case it is almost certainly SN2.

The difference is whether the Cl leaves first and then the alkoxide adds or whether the alkoxide forces the Cl out while attacking the carbon all in one motion.

The "substitution" refers to the carbon with the leaving group attached to it.  In this case the net change at that carbon is that the chloride is substituted for an oxygen in the product.  In an elimination reaction, however, the chloride would just be gone with nothing taking its place (the carbon would only be attached to three other atoms).

The DMF doesn't directly play a role in the reaction mechanism and it remains unchanged.

LuckyDude35

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Re:DMF Question
« Reply #17 on: September 08, 2004, 03:17:09 AM »
Ohhhh, Ok! Thank you very much for your *delete me* I really appreciate it and will work on these and come back if I have more questions, thanks again!

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Re:DMF Question
« Reply #18 on: September 08, 2004, 03:19:09 AM »
No problem.

I'm headed for bed, so your on your own for a while.  If you get stuck, check out some of the other pages on that site I linked to above.  I think that they have some stuff on mechanisms.

wazy

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Re:DMF Question
« Reply #19 on: March 31, 2006, 11:49:51 PM »
Hi all:

Can anyone tell me The Heat of combustion of DMF?

Many thanks

wazy
« Last Edit: April 03, 2006, 02:35:14 AM by wazy »

wazy

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Re:DMF Question
« Reply #20 on: April 03, 2006, 02:36:42 AM »
Hi all:

Sorry need to PUSH!

wazy

Offline mike

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Re:DMF Question
« Reply #21 on: April 03, 2006, 02:54:18 AM »
-262.4 x 105 J/kg

by the way we used to have a DMF award at my old work, can you guess what it stands for in the award? hint it was for people who screwed up :D
There is no science without fancy, and no art without facts.

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Re:DMF Question
« Reply #22 on: April 03, 2006, 03:26:10 AM »
Dangerous Mother ...
Most Common Suggestions I Make on the Forums.
1. Start by writing a balanced chemical equation.
2. Don't confuse thermodynamic stability with chemical reactivity.
3. Forum Supports LaTex

Offline mike

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Re:DMF Question
« Reply #23 on: April 03, 2006, 07:28:28 AM »
Quote
Dangerous Mother ...

You got it ;)
There is no science without fancy, and no art without facts.

wazy

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Re:DMF Question
« Reply #24 on: April 06, 2006, 01:54:58 AM »
Many thanks to down under.
BTW: I use the data for the calculate diesel consumption in my company thermal oxidizer. Recently, it was much higher, study the causes.

Thanks again.
« Last Edit: April 06, 2006, 02:08:35 AM by wazy »

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