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Topic: Why is bond enthalpy/energy only limited to gases?  (Read 421 times)

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Offline KudoAnastasia

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Why is bond enthalpy/energy only limited to gases?
« on: December 23, 2019, 03:29:37 AM »
Why is it that you can not measure the bond enthalpy for liquid or solid states of matter?

Offline Borek

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Re: Why is bond enthalpy/energy only limited to gases?
« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2019, 03:47:26 AM »
You definitely can measure bond enthalpy for solids.

They are typically listed for gaseous state, as then there is no need to account for all kinds of intermolecular interactions that could change the measured value. Still, for carbon-carbon bonds you can find bond enthalpies listed separately for graphite and diamond.
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Offline KudoAnastasia

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Re: Why is bond enthalpy/energy only limited to gases?
« Reply #2 on: December 23, 2019, 03:53:55 AM »
Okay, thanks for the clarification, was a bit confused when I first learned about it.

You definitely can measure bond enthalpy for solids.

They are typically listed for gaseous state, as then there is no need to account for all kinds of intermolecular interactions that could change the measured value. Still, for carbon-carbon bonds you can find bond enthalpies listed separately for graphite and diamond.

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