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Topic: Carbonated water  (Read 289 times)

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Offline Simpleme

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Carbonated water
« on: February 08, 2020, 02:32:19 AM »
Only 1 question. I am a gardener not a chemical person. I wanted to trial a new watering technique.
Can i adjust the pH of carbonated water to a 6.0-6.5 pH and still keep the carbonic acid in the solution. I want to feed plant carbonic acid (increase photosynthesis) but need pH correct for plant to uptake other nutrients i put into solution. I got no idea and dont want to kill my plants to find the answer. Help please!

Offline chenbeier

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Re: Carbonated water
« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2020, 05:37:57 AM »
What is the pH of the Water now.

Offline Simpleme

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Re: Carbonated water
« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2020, 07:11:10 AM »
Carbonated water sitting at 4.2

Offline Corribus

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Re: Carbonated water
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2020, 09:18:34 AM »
Distilled water under our atmosphere usually has a pH around 5.6 or so because carbon dioxide reacts with water to form carbonic acid, which dissociates to lower the pH. In carbonated water, the concentration of carbonic acid is higher because there's more carbon dioxide around, hence the lower pH. If you adjust the pH by adding alkaline, you will shift the equilibrium toward carbon dioxide. Basically, you will decarbonate the water. You will still have carbonic acid but nearly as much. pH is a log scale so adjusting from pH 4.2 to pH 6.0-6.5 is roughly a 100fold less acidic. So I guess it depends on the concentration of carbonic acid you want to deliver to the plant. Of course, you will still have plant biology and chemistry to contend with, so having more or less carbonic acid in your water may or may not affect how much carbonic acid makes it to wherever it needs to go.

Just out of curiosity, what makes you think carbonic acid in your water will "increase photosynthesis"?
What men are poets who can speak of Jupiter if he were like a man, but if he is an immense spinning sphere of methane and ammonia must be silent?  - Richard P. Feynman

Offline Simpleme

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Re: Carbonated water
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2020, 10:32:58 PM »
Thank you for your answer. Just to clarify my take on your answer; when i adjust the pH i will have cancelled out the carbon essentially. To answer your question about why to feed carbonated water to my plants;
Plants usually take in carbon dioxide through their leaves, however it has been proven that they can also uptake carbon through their roots, what happens then is the plants stop using their leaves to take in carbon and also can slow and even stop making leaves altogether, the plant becomes more efficient. So the plants can then put their energy into making flowers and fruit, as a result of increased efficiency the plants will have greater yields come harvest time. Some plants dry weight can be up to 30% carbon. Alot of INDOOR commercial growers add extra carbon dioxide into their atmosphere up to 1500ppm to increase yeilds. Since carbon in water CAN'T be used at the required pH for plants, i understand why they add to their air. I hope this gives you a basic picture of my thinking

Offline Borek

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Re: Carbonated water
« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2020, 03:37:16 AM »
No leaves means no chlorophyll and no photosynthesis, I don't see how it can lead to an increased yield.
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