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Topic: What does the V mean in "Charge Water (3V)"?  (Read 247 times)

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Offline RobertQues

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What does the V mean in "Charge Water (3V)"?
« on: February 12, 2020, 11:14:02 AM »
Hi all,

looking at a process description I sometimes read things like "Charge Water (3V)". What does the "V" mean here?

E. g.:
https://patents.google.com/patent/EP2917213A1

There you can find:
Quote
[00420] 25. Charge Water (3v) to the Reactor II.

Is it always liter? Because at some lines within the patent you will find "liter" mentioned afterwards, e. g.:
Quote
[00397] 2. Charge Dichloromethane (8.0 L, 8v) to the reactor I.

Looking forward to your opinion.

Offline mjc123

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Re: What does the V mean in "Charge Water (3V)"?
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2020, 11:32:24 AM »
I assume it means "volumes", giving a relative as well as an absolute measure. Thus if you were to repeat the process on a smaller or larger scale, the volumes of
dichloromethane (step 2)
dichloromethane (step 6)
methanol (step 14)
water (step 18)
water (step 25)
should always be in the ratio 8:2:1:10:3

Offline AWK

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Re: What does the V mean in "Charge Water (3V)"?
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2020, 12:43:43 PM »
V means volume but different in different examples. Check US patent as pdf of the printed version. Look at stoichiometry tables.
AWK

Offline RobertQues

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Re: What does the V mean in "Charge Water (3V)"?
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2020, 04:09:45 PM »
Thanks!

I have another example where liquids in the description are charged in "V" and solids are added as mole equivalents. How can I convert this to an absolute scale, e. g. to grams and liters if only "V" and "eqv." are mentioned (no absolute values are given)?

Offline AWK

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Re: What does the V mean in "Charge Water (3V)"?
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2020, 05:06:53 PM »
Just check the stoichiometry table for this example.
AWK

Offline RobertQues

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Re: What does the V mean in "Charge Water (3V)"?
« Reply #5 on: February 25, 2020, 04:29:53 AM »
Just check the stoichiometry table for this example.

Thanks AWK.

I have another example where no stoichiometry table is given and the process description only mentions "charge X (3V), then charge Y (5V) and then add Z (1.0 eq.)"

I wonder how I can get the absolute mass/ volume of X and Y, given a scale of 40 gramms of Z for example.

Offline AWK

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Re: What does the V mean in "Charge Water (3V)"?
« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2020, 10:16:00 AM »
Patents use a specific language that must be understood by reading the patent several times, but everything must be clearly explained (so that at least the patent attorney understands this).
X, Y, and Z are probably reagent symbols for liquids (or gases) expressed in volumes, solids in masses or equivalents. You need to read the description carefully, because equivalents may have a different meaning from moles.

After reading a dozen or so patents, you will start to understand it without reading again and you'll know where to look for (hidden) explanations.
AWK

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