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Topic: Looking for an suitable ionic compound  (Read 321 times)

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Offline visviva

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Looking for an suitable ionic compound
« on: March 08, 2020, 03:29:18 PM »
Hi!

As circumstances would have it, I have copious amount free electrons left over from a electrodynamic process that I'm working on p.t. the free electrons can be made available either in gaseous form (with some difficulty) or as current in a wire.

Now I would like to neutralize said free electrons by mixing them with an water soluble ionic compound. And this is where I would like your suggestions, to which ionic compound can can you add free electrons and maximize the (pecuniary) value added?

In other words, can you add pecuniary value to an arbitrary compound by adding free electrons? As an alternative to simply vent the free electrons into the atmosphere as a pure waste by-product.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

Klaus Z

Offline Borek

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Re: Looking for an suitable ionic compound
« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2020, 07:30:43 PM »
I have copious amount free electrons left over

Huh? Care to elaborate?
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Offline visviva

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Re: Looking for an suitable ionic compound
« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2020, 05:04:53 AM »
I don't know how to properly respond to the question "Huh?"

Please elaborate what you would need me to elaborate, your question is very unclear to me.

Offline Borek

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Re: Looking for an suitable ionic compound
« Reply #3 on: March 09, 2020, 10:09:18 AM »
I have no idea what you mean by "free electrons". I am not aware of any chemical process that could produce them.

"Copious amount of free electrons" - how many is "copious" - a mole? Two? Have you ever tried to estimate force with which two moles of electrons would repel themselves? Compared that number to the gravitational attraction between Earth and Moon?
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Offline visviva

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Re: Looking for an suitable ionic compound
« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2020, 01:28:00 PM »
I have no idea what you mean by "free electrons".

As in "free to move" like Pinocchio without strings e.g. as in Fermi Gas and free electron model.

I am not aware of any chemical process that could produce them.

And I'm not asking about how to produce them.

I'm asking how to get rid of them while producing something else of pecuniary value e.g. what compound would combine with "free electrons" and produce something that could be sold for money at a profit?

how many is "copious" - a mole? Two?

The number of free electrons produced is directly proportional to the amount of energy the primary process consumes, so "copious" can be whatever you want it to be in the context of my question.

Have you ever tried to estimate force with which two moles of electrons would repel themselves? Compared that number to the gravitational attraction between Earth and Moon?

No, it seems irrelevant to my question, but I could be mistaken, in which case - please educate me.







Offline Borek

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Re: Looking for an suitable ionic compound
« Reply #5 on: March 09, 2020, 02:44:40 PM »
As in "free to move" like Pinocchio without strings e.g. as in Fermi Gas and free electron model.

Then I have no idea what you mean by "neutralize them". The only way to neutralize a charge is to combine it with a identical charge of an opposite sign, but electrons in the free electron model don't require neutralization - they are inside of a lattice that contains the positive charge and the whole system is already electrically neutral.
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Offline wildfyr

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Re: Looking for an suitable ionic compound
« Reply #6 on: March 09, 2020, 07:11:33 PM »
visviva, we are all thoroughly confused. Is this a thought experiment? A book? A real industrial process?

Offline visviva

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Re: Looking for an suitable ionic compound
« Reply #7 on: March 10, 2020, 05:17:39 AM »
Then I have no idea what you mean by "neutralize them". The only way to neutralize a charge is to combine it with a identical charge of an opposite sign

First you say "I have no idea" then you proceed with the very definition of how to neutralize charges, are you deliberately trying to pull my leg here(?) Please don't answer my question, it's rhetorical.

Then you say "but electrons in the free electron model don't require neutralization - they are inside of a lattice that contains the positive charge and the whole system is already electrically neutral"

I never said that I wanted to neutralize those electrons, that was an example of electron mobility as you claimed you were perplexed about that concept.

This is going nowhere fast. Please delete my account and my question, obviously I made a mistake by signing up here.

Thank you in advance.

Offline visviva

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Re: Looking for an suitable ionic compound
« Reply #8 on: March 10, 2020, 05:26:32 AM »
visviva, we are all thoroughly confused. Is this a thought experiment? A book? A real industrial process?

I can fully appreciate your confusion.

You are making way way too much assumptions where it is not required, instead of actually trying to read and understand my original question. And you know the old adage about assumptions? It goes like this: "To assume is to make an ASS out of U and ME" - and I don't appreciate that you are deliberately trying to make an ass out me.

Now please delete my account and post, I made an obvious mistake by signing up here.

Offline Borek

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Re: Looking for an suitable ionic compound
« Reply #9 on: March 10, 2020, 07:06:52 AM »
instead of actually trying to read and understand my original question

I am afraid you are missing the point - we do try to understand your question, problem is, what you wrote doesn't add up to any reasonable physics nor chemistry. Sometimes that means people do have a point, just use incorrect language, that's especially the case with non-native speakers - which is why I wanted you to clarify what you mean.

Basically you are asking how to make a trap for pink, flying unicorns. As far as I am aware there no pink, flying unicorns, so I can't help designing the trap.
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