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Topic: Reduce Argon concentration in air.  (Read 403 times)

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Offline rupy

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Reduce Argon concentration in air.
« on: March 15, 2020, 09:13:16 AM »
I have this problem with Argon building up from my water supply in the house.

Since Argon is heavier than N2 and O2 is it concentrated at the floor?

Does that mean I need floor ventilation to remove it?

How does Argon behave when the water/air temperature rises?

Does Argon rise in still water naturally?

Is there a good graph over density of the Ar, N2 and O2 at different temperatures?

Offline chenbeier

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Re: Reduce Argon concentration in air.
« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2020, 09:25:54 AM »
In air there is 0.93% v.v Ar. How do do you know you get Argon in your water supply?
The soloubility is poor about 53 ml/l at  273 K.
And even it is accumulating in the room. It is simmilar to nitrogen. So no problem.
No ventilation is needed.

Offline rupy

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Re: Reduce Argon concentration in air.
« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2020, 02:41:02 PM »
I get headaches, apparently Argon can act like CO and take the spot where O2 goes on the red blodcells leading to problems.

Argon comes for a Potassium isotope and I have a lot of Potassium in the ground.

I'm trying to know if the problem is Argon but in order to build the right solution I need to know if Argon goes to the floor and how it dissipates from water.

I also boil water on a woodstove in a 80 liter casserole, so it's a lot of water!

Offline chenbeier

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Re: Reduce Argon concentration in air.
« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2020, 03:12:52 PM »
Argon is a noble gas and don't do chemical reaction. It is not comparable with carbon monoxide. Did you asked a physician regarding your headaches.
I think is not the root course.

Offline rupy

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Re: Reduce Argon concentration in air.
« Reply #4 on: March 15, 2020, 05:38:14 PM »
Google "inert gas asphyxia". It can only be a gas that causes the headaches, I have eliminated all other possible causes. And the only gas I know of that exists in nature that could cause these kinds of headaches (exactly the same as CO headaches, I have had those too) is Argon.

But I'm not asking for help about what causes the headaches but instead help with the chemistry of Argon to try and eliminate the problems. So if you know how Argon behaves in air or water that is what I'm looking for.

Edit: apparently Argon can be trapped in "clathrate" in water. Maybe when I boil the water more Argon is released?
« Last Edit: March 15, 2020, 06:02:09 PM by rupy »

Offline chenbeier

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Re: Reduce Argon concentration in air.
« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2020, 05:46:44 PM »
This behaviour exists only in absence of oxygen. And not only Argon can cause it see:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inert_gas_asphyxiation


Offline rupy

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Re: Reduce Argon concentration in air.
« Reply #6 on: March 15, 2020, 06:06:51 PM »
Sure, but unless there is something removing the oxygen out of the air, I don't see how anything else can cause the headaches but Argon. Also the headaches appear even when ventilation is abundant, like in the summer with windows open.

I'm also going to try being in the house without any water to make sure the problem is connected to the water.

Offline Borek

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Re: Reduce Argon concentration in air.
« Reply #7 on: March 15, 2020, 06:33:06 PM »
Sorry to be blunt, but you are just combining terms and ideas without understanding. This is a classic pseudoscience. You can be sure your problems are not in any way related to argon coming from the water supply, you are just making it up.

Since Argon is heavier than N2 and O2 is it concentrated at the floor?

No, it is not. Thermal mixing is way too strong for that.

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Is there a good graph over density of the Ar, N2 and O2 at different temperatures?

No need for graphs, these can be easily estimated from ideal gas equation and molar masses. It won't help you, as to separate gases with different molar masses one needs very high columns and very low temperatures, there is no measurable separation in a typical room conditions.

apparently Argon can act like CO and take the spot where O2 goes on the red blodcells leading to problems.

No, it can't.

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Argon comes for a Potassium isotope and I have a lot of Potassium in the ground.

Yes, K-40 decays into Ar. No, amounts of Ar produced this way are many orders of magnitude lower than the amount of argon present in the air, so potassium is not a real local source of Ar.

If you have headaches I suggest you consult your GP, this will be definitely more effective than looking for answers in places you don't understand.

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