June 05, 2020, 02:50:30 PM
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Topic: Synthetic electrochemistry  (Read 261 times)

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Offline spidermclovin

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Synthetic electrochemistry
« on: March 30, 2020, 05:50:40 AM »
I've been trying to get a desulfurization reaction to work under a reductive potential (E= -1.0 V) with NaCl as the electrolyte.
After 24 hours, there are large pH changes from pH 7.2 to pH 10/11. I have tried using PBS buffer but this doesnt seem to help.
Any ideas?   

Offline chenbeier

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Re: Synthetic electrochemistry
« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2020, 06:46:25 AM »
During electrolysis of NaCl solution you create on cathode side hydrogen and NaOH. Buffers are useless in this case. On anode side depending on the electrode material chlorine and/ or corrosion of electrode.

Offline spidermclovin

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Re: Synthetic electrochemistry
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2020, 06:58:02 AM »
How do you avoid this, use a less reductive potential?
Or a different electrolyte? 
I'm using carbon electrodes. 

Offline chenbeier

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Re: Synthetic electrochemistry
« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2020, 10:18:26 AM »
Only acid or a metal salt, would work. Acid only develop hydrogen, metal salt like coppersulfate would give metal precipitation on the cathode.

Offline kriggy

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Re: Synthetic electrochemistry
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2020, 07:25:39 AM »
Can you try different electrolyte?  I recall Baran group among others having some papers about synthetic electrochemistry so you might want to look in there to see what electrolytes they are using.

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