September 30, 2020, 05:07:44 AM
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Topic: What are the safety measures for Adsorption of Magnetite projects?  (Read 384 times)

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Offline metallurgy

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We plan to make a project (Phd) of Magnetite's Adsorption for metals on wastewater. Which measures should I take in the lab?
I have an allergy to chemicals and their vapor, is this kind of project would be a hazardous environment?

Offline Corribus

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Re: What are the safety measures for Adsorption of Magnetite projects?
« Reply #1 on: June 22, 2020, 02:01:50 PM »
I have an allergy to chemicals and their vapor
This is kind of like saying you're allergic to food. Yes, but which ones? Nobody is allergic to all chemicals. It's impossible, insofar as it's not even clear what the definition of a chemical is.
What men are poets who can speak of Jupiter if he were like a man, but if he is an immense spinning sphere of methane and ammonia must be silent?  - Richard P. Feynman

Offline metallurgy

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Re: What are the safety measures for Adsorption of Magnetite projects?
« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2020, 01:22:53 AM »
I have an allergy to chemicals and their vapor
This is kind of like saying you're allergic to food. Yes, but which ones? Nobody is allergic to all chemicals. It's impossible, insofar as it's not even clear what the definition of a chemical is.

Well, the chemicals or lab. atmosphere that cause respiratory problems. I can't say a specific one/s. But mostly hazardous chemicals.

Offline wildfyr

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Re: What are the safety measures for Adsorption of Magnetite projects?
« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2020, 12:51:10 PM »
You're doing a PhD in a chemistry adjacent field and you think you're allergic in general to hazardous chemicals?

Even saying you're allergic to hazardous chemical is gibberish. Hazards are classified in many ways. Some chemicals would be safe to eat, but like to explode. Others are highly carcinogenic but would not cause any immediate ill effects. Some cause bad burns at high concentration, but at low concentrations are totally harmless.

Are you saying that if you walk into an active chemistry lab, in general, it causes you difficulty breathing, hives, etc?

Offline metallurgy

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Re: What are the safety measures for Adsorption of Magnetite projects?
« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2020, 01:17:44 AM »
You're doing a PhD in a chemistry adjacent field and you think you're allergic in general to hazardous chemicals?

Even saying you're allergic to hazardous chemical is gibberish. Hazards are classified in many ways. Some chemicals would be safe to eat, but like to explode. Others are highly carcinogenic but would not cause any immediate ill effects. Some cause bad burns at high concentration, but at low concentrations are totally harmless.

Are you saying that if you walk into an active chemistry lab, in general, it causes you difficulty breathing, hives, etc?

No, it's Phd in metallurgy&materials engineering. But the assistant professor's specialty is in nanomaterials&chem.

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"Are you saying that if you walk into an active chemistry lab, in general, it causes you difficulty breathing"

Exactly. That's why I want to choose harmless projects, thesis.

Offline Corribus

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Re: What are the safety measures for Adsorption of Magnetite projects?
« Reply #5 on: June 24, 2020, 01:15:16 PM »

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"Are you saying that if you walk into an active chemistry lab, in general, it causes you difficulty breathing"

Exactly. That's why I want to choose harmless projects, thesis.
This isn't meant to sound dismissive, but are you sure this isn't in your head? How many labs have you walked into? Labs are extremely diverse and so are the chemicals used in them. It's highly unlikely you are actually allergic to every chemical in every lab at the levels that would be in the highly cycled atmospheres in properly ventilated work spaces. Some people don't like the smells in chemistry labs and get paranoid that they are breathing in dangerous chemicals. Chemophobia is actually a thing.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemophobia

Either way, it sounds like you should choose a different lab (or, frankly, profession), one that are physically comfortable being in. It is unreasonable to expect that you can function efficiently in a lab that routinely uses chemicals and reagents that you cannot be around.  It is also probably unreasonable to expect that the lab will accommodate extreme needs. It'd be like signing up to work in a lab that does peanut research when you have an extreme allergy to peanuts.. You would never choose to do that - or at least you shouldn't - and it's unfair to expect the lab alter itself fundamentally to cater to your needs. It's a peanut lab - it's not going to start studying strawberries simply because you can't be around peanuts.

Work with your program director if you can to identify an environment that you can function in.
What men are poets who can speak of Jupiter if he were like a man, but if he is an immense spinning sphere of methane and ammonia must be silent?  - Richard P. Feynman

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