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Topic: Defining alkoxy and ether substituents  (Read 642 times)

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Offline justus2727

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Defining alkoxy and ether substituents
« on: July 11, 2020, 05:56:10 AM »
So I am trying to figure out local law regulations for the phenethylamine catch-all clause (Switzerland) and I believe they are actually the same as in the United Kingdom. I'm sure this is not against the forum rules to discuss chemical structures of drugs, I am in no point asking how to make these and my main point is to make sure that they are by definition illegal.

I don't have extended knowledge in organic chemistry so I'm not entirely sure on whether the following two cases are included by definition of the clause. I'm spent quite some time finding out the exact definitions of alkoxy, alkylenedioxy, ether, halide substituents etc and I couldn't get a definite answer yet (at least from wikipedia..). Input would be greatly appreciated if anyone would have the time xperience and enjoyment :)


The shortened text of the clause would be:

Quote
Any compound structurally derived from Phenethylamine, α-methylphenethylamine by substitution in the ring to any extent with alkyl, alkoxy, aklylenedioxy or halide substituents, whether or not further substituted in the ring by one or more other univalent substituents.

I include structures for phenethylamine and a-methylphenethylamine


Additionally, laws in Switzerland further add this definition:

Quote
Ethers, Esters, Salts and Stereoisomers of 2C-B, DOB and para-bromoamphetamine

2C-B: DOB: p-bromoamphetamine:


The substances in question would be 2C-B-FLY and Bromo-DragonFLY but for simplicity I will just show the structures of them.

2C-B-FLY:
Bromo-DragonFLY:

note the enclosure of the methoxy groups into a ring system bound back to the phenyl ring.

1. So 2C-B-FLY does not contain alkyl, alkylenedioxy substituents on phenethylamine. The same would go for Bromo-DragonFLY in respect to a-methylphenethylamine. I hope we can agree to this.

2. Both substances contain an halide substituent (Bromine), but the scope defines "whether or not further substituted in the ring by one or more other univalent substituents", and I believe a dihydrofuran ring (2C-B-FLY) and furan ring (Bromo-DragonFLY) substituent is bivalent (two bonding points, which would mean it is bivalently further substituted (twice) and that is by definition not within the scope (which would only include "whether" NO or UNIVALENT substitutions)). I really hope you get me with this one.

3. One could consider the dihydrofuran rings on 2C-B-FLY as alkoxy substituents, but the alkyl part of the alkoxy group is fused with the main phenyl ring and would thereby miss an extra hydrogen where it is fused back into the ring, and is therefore not a true alkyl substituent (by definition an alkane missing just ONE hydrogen, in the case of alkoxy on the oxygen atom). Bromo-DragonFLY contains a double-bonded carbon and is therefore certainly not an alkoxy or alkane but an alkene. Maybe you could consider both as cycloalkoxy or cycloalkeneoxy?

4. Are the dihydrofuran and furan rings on 2C-B-FLY and Bromo-DragonFLY ether derivatives of 2C-B and DOB, respectively? The only two problems I'd have are first, there already being ether substitutions (this problem can be circumvented if you take p-bromoamphetamine which doesn't contain the methoxy groups. This would work for Bromo-DragonFLY), and second, the ether substitution fusing back into the ring, which would still mean that one side of the ether is not a true alkyl substituent. Rather they would be cycloethers?



Maybe I'm just overthinking this or I'm just missing something lol. Would thank anyone that takes their time

Offline rolnor

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Re: Defining alkoxy and ether substituents
« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2020, 07:05:39 AM »
Its possible they are illegal, its a matter of the law. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2C-B-FLY

Offline justus2727

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Re: Defining alkoxy and ether substituents
« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2020, 09:30:55 AM »
yeah very possible. I believe in the UK they are specifically named, but in my country they are not, we just have the phenethylamine catch-all clause and I was wondering if it would technically not be included in this scope, not whether I can prove them to be legal. Of course, anyone claiming 2C-B-FLY or the like to be legal wouldn't get away with it haha

Offline Borek

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Re: Defining alkoxy and ether substituents
« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2020, 09:52:43 AM »
I wonder how inclusive is the "structurally derived from" statement, technically 2-naphtylamine counts, so any azo dye made from it counts too (not that they are still made this way).

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Offline justus2727

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Re: Defining alkoxy and ether substituents
« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2020, 11:42:16 AM »
not sure if that would count, what'd make you think that is is included? I don't think that an aryl substitution counts as either of the mentioned substituents, and it also wouldn't be a univalent substitution, not even a phenethylamine!

Offline rolnor

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Re: Defining alkoxy and ether substituents
« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2020, 12:33:30 PM »
Why do you want to know this, are you planning to make/buy/use any of the drugs?

Offline justus2727

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Re: Defining alkoxy and ether substituents
« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2020, 01:17:39 PM »
like I said I was checking out local laws and I enjoyed seeing what would be illegal in my country and what wouldn't. I checked by the catch-all clauses they had, basically they did a good job and illegalized some 198/220 most popular psychoactive compounds. Of the remaining ones, these two compounds were unclear to me whether they can be included in the scope. This has nothing to do with drug use of myself or others, just curiosity and probs a hint of ADHD

Offline rolnor

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Re: Defining alkoxy and ether substituents
« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2020, 02:09:10 PM »
Here in Sweden and also in the US there is problem with acetylphentanyl and analogs, many dies from overdose, very potent opiates. Whe have had labs pushing out different analogs not being classified as illegal, acrylphentanyl etc. Recently some of these pushers where convicted for man-sloughter, judge mean that the pushers known that this was dangerous stuff and they risked others life by supplying users. This very effectively stopped the supply of these analogs. The drugs where provided as a solution in a small spray-bottle to be used in the nose, this looks very innocent, not like syringes and needles and this made the step for begginer-users much lower than for heroine. I had cats that had surgery in the mouth at the vet and I got a small amount of morphine with me from the vet to give the cat the next day to reduce pain, I tested this myself and I understand that this type if drug can very quickly destroy your life, its better than sex and its so effortless, so easy to get high, really terrible stuff.

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